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United States (United States) (search for this): article 15
own, but we suppose that she was the bark Oasis, Capt. Creeck, from Baltimore. She was the only bark that arrived that day. We are informed that the European vessels hoist the State colors in leaving the harbor, but that occasionally the Northern United States skippers refuse this courtesy and have to be brought to by the argument of a little power, proceeding out of the month of one of the guns of the Fort. We trust that presently they will be on better terms with "The Confederate States of Ae European vessels hoist the State colors in leaving the harbor, but that occasionally the Northern United States skippers refuse this courtesy and have to be brought to by the argument of a little power, proceeding out of the month of one of the guns of the Fort. We trust that presently they will be on better terms with "The Confederate States of America," and will take pleasure in giving them the respect which is their due, and which, God willing, they intend to enforce, if it be refused.
Saluting the flag. --The Mobile Tribune, of the 14th inst., has the following paragraph: The British ship "Timour" passed the Fort on Tuesday, on her way to sea. She gracefully dipped her ensign. The salute was as courteously acknowledged by the Fort. An American bark came into the harbor on Monday in gallant style and gave the Fort the same polite recognition. Her name was not known, but we suppose that she was the bark Oasis, Capt. Creeck, from Baltimore. She was the only bark that arrived that day. We are informed that the European vessels hoist the State colors in leaving the harbor, but that occasionally the Northern United States skippers refuse this courtesy and have to be brought to by the argument of a little power, proceeding out of the month of one of the guns of the Fort. We trust that presently they will be on better terms with "The Confederate States of America," and will take pleasure in giving them the respect which is their due, and which, God willing,
Saluting the flag. --The Mobile Tribune, of the 14th inst., has the following paragraph: The British ship "Timour" passed the Fort on Tuesday, on her way to sea. She gracefully dipped her ensign. The salute was as courteously acknowledged by the Fort. An American bark came into the harbor on Monday in gallant style and gave the Fort the same polite recognition. Her name was not known, but we suppose that she was the bark Oasis, Capt. Creeck, from Baltimore. She was the only bark that arrived that day. We are informed that the European vessels hoist the State colors in leaving the harbor, but that occasionally the Northern United States skippers refuse this courtesy and have to be brought to by the argument of a little power, proceeding out of the month of one of the guns of the Fort. We trust that presently they will be on better terms with "The Confederate States of America," and will take pleasure in giving them the respect which is their due, and which, God willing,