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February 21st (search for this): article 1
times to preserve it. Again thanking you for the reception given me, allow me to come to a close. Departure of Mr. Lincoln from New York. New York,Feb. 21--Mr. Lincoln and party left here this morning at 8 o'clock, greeted with the cheers of an immense crowd and salvos of artillery. The Canard steamer Africa wadecorated with flags, and fired a salute of twenty-one guns on the departure of the President's train. Arrival and reception at Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Feb. 21. --The train bearing Mr. Lincoln and suite arrived at the Kensington depot about 4 o'clock this afternoon.-- They were escorted to carriages in waiting; thee Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. Mr. Lincoln then retired, and after supper held a levee. Mr. Lincoln in New Jersey. Newark, N J.,Feb. 21.--Mr. Lincoln and suite arrived at the Morris and Essex Depot in this city at 9 ½ o'clock, and was received by a committee of the Common Council, headed by the Ma
eople. He assured them that he should do nothing inconsistent with the teachings of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. Mr. Lincoln then retired, and after supper held a levee. Mr. Lincoln in New Jersey. Newark, N J.,Feb. 21.--Mr. Lincoln and suite arrived at the Morris and Essex Depot in this city at 9 ½ o'clock, and was received by a committee of the Common Council, headed by the Mayor and a deputation of Republicans on horseback. On entering the depot, Mayor Bigelow addressed Mr. L. as follows: Mr. President Elect: On behalf of the Common Council and my fellow- citizens, I most cordially welcome you to our city, and tender to you its hospitalities. I welcome you, sir, on behalf of the citizens of the metropolis of this State in point of population and trade, who have ever been loyal to the Constitution and maintained the integrity of the Union, and who entertain the ardent hope that your Administration will be governed by that wisdom and disc
R. N. Brown (search for this): article 1
made. After Mrs. Lincoln had taken her seat in the cars, at Buffalo, for the West, her son Bob entered the office of R. N. Brown, Esq., the gentlemanly Superintendent of the State Line Railroad, and inquired if Mr. Brown was in .. Mr. Brown responMr. Brown was in .. Mr. Brown responded and inquired what was wanted. His interrogator addressed him in substantially the following language: "My name is Bob Lincoln; I'm a son of Old Abe — the old woman is in the cars raising h — l about her passes — I wish you would go anMr. Brown responded and inquired what was wanted. His interrogator addressed him in substantially the following language: "My name is Bob Lincoln; I'm a son of Old Abe — the old woman is in the cars raising h — l about her passes — I wish you would go and attend to her!" Mr. Brown very promptly filled out the requisite papers to enable Mrs. Lincoln and family to ride over his road without payment of fare, and delivered them to her. It is probable that " the old woman" gave Bob no further trouMr. Brown very promptly filled out the requisite papers to enable Mrs. Lincoln and family to ride over his road without payment of fare, and delivered them to her. It is probable that " the old woman" gave Bob no further trouble about the passes on t
e to be about," replied Mr. Lincoln, very soberly; and then turning to the Mayor, finished the remark by saying, "that fellow is from the country, and meant to be polite." "This is my husband," said a lady to Mr. Lincoln; "you must shake hands with him, for he is a member of the Illinois Legislature." "He might come from a worse State," replied Mr. Lincoln, taking the Illinois legislator by the hand, "but he could not have a better half." "Here is a man," said the Mayor, as a Mr. Cohen, from South Carolina advanced, "who is rather out of your bailiwick." "Here is my hand," Mr. Lincoln remarked, "we will shake hands for the Union." "You must let me shake hands with you, because I am as tall as you are," said a tall, gentlemanly-looking man. "I don't know about your being as tall," replied Mr. Lincoln, "let us measure." Mr. Lincoln wheeled his back about, and the two stood back to back. "You are an inch the tallest," exclaimed the Mayor. "I t
rk — speech of welcome by the Mayor--Mr. Lincoln's reply — Incidents, &c. A large crowd gathered in the Park, at New York, on Wednesday morning, to witness the official reception of the President elect. Mr. Lincoln arrived at a few minutes before eleven o'clock, in charge of the Committee of the Common Council, and was immediately escorted to the Governor's Rooms, where the Mayor and a few friends, with the members of the press, awaited his coming. He was introduced to the Mayor by Mr. Cornell, of the Board of Aldermen. The Mayor spoke as follows: The Mayor's speech. Mr. Lincoln: As Mayor of New York, it becomes my duty to extend to you an official welcome in behalf of the corporation. In doing so, permit me to say that this city has never offered hospitality to a man clothed with more exalted powers, or resting under graver responsibilities, than those which circumstances have devolved upon you. Coming into office with a dismembered Government to reconstruct, and a
Burnley Henry (search for this): article 1
ne hundred thousand people were gathered along the line of march. The weather was cold, threatening snow. On arriving at the headquarters selected for him, the Continental Hotel, Mr. Lincoln was conducted to the balcony?and introduced to Mayor Henry. The noisy multitude below greeted his appearance with boisterous cheering, but both the Mayor's welcome and his reply were unheard excepting by those in the immediate vicinity. Mr. Lincoln displays great earnestness in his delivery, which caused the mass to reflect his views in deafening applause. The Mayor Intimates that there is a Crisis. Mayor Henry, in receiving Mr. Lincoln, referred to the calamitous condition of affairs, which left but few firesides without its dreadful visitations. The masses, said the Mayor, are weary and sick of the selfish schemes and wily plots of selfish politicians, and trust in the statesmanship and patriotism of President Lincoln to restore peace and prosperity. He regretted that the sho
Bob Lincoln (search for this): article 1
q., the gentlemanly Superintendent of the State Line Railroad, and inquired if Mr. Brown was in .. Mr. Brown responded and inquired what was wanted. His interrogator addressed him in substantially the following language: "My name is Bob Lincoln; I'm a son of Old Abe — the old woman is in the cars raising h — l about her passes — I wish you would go and attend to her!" Mr. Brown very promptly filled out the requisite papers to enable Mrs. Lincoln and family to ride over his road His interrogator addressed him in substantially the following language: "My name is Bob Lincoln; I'm a son of Old Abe — the old woman is in the cars raising h — l about her passes — I wish you would go and attend to her!" Mr. Brown very promptly filled out the requisite papers to enable Mrs. Lincoln and family to ride over his road without payment of fare, and delivered them to her. It is probable that " the old woman" gave Bob no further trouble about the passes on t
Robert Lincoln (search for this): article 1
Tour of Mr. Lincoln. arrival and reception at New York — speech of welcome by the Mayor--Mr. Lincoln's reply — Incidents, &c. A large crowd gathered in the Park, at New York, on Wednpoke with an air of great deliberation. Mr. Lincoln responded to the Mayor's address as followsncoln from New York. New York,Feb. 21--Mr. Lincoln and party left here this morning at 8 o'cloo carriages in waiting; the one allotted to Mr. Lincoln was drawn by four white horses, being conspepting by those in the immediate vicinity. Mr. Lincoln displays great earnestness in his delivery,dministration. As the train moved off, Mr. Lincoln bowed his acknowledgments to the crowd fromdo look like me, that's certain," responded Mr. Lincoln; "the fact is settled that you are a handsouess, will take me down," said the Mayor to Mr. Lincoln, as a very tall man advanced. "Strangeingfield no provision had been made. After Mrs. Lincoln had taken her seat in the cars, at Buffalo,[25 more...]<
nciliatory means — aided by the wisdom of Almighty God. The Mayor, in delivering the above address, spoke with an air of great deliberation. Mr. Lincoln responded to the Mayor's address as follows: Mr. Lincoln's speech. Mr. Mayor--It is with feelings of deep gratitude that I make my acknowledgments for the reception extended to me by the commercial city of New York. I cannot but remember that this is done by a people, a majority of whom do not agree with me in poliom and discretion which will be the means of transmitting the Confederated States as a unit to your successors and through them to the latest generation. Mr. Lincoln in a low tone, but with emphasis, replied substantially as follows: Mr. Mayor:--I thank you for the reception to your city, and would say in response, my heart is sincerely devoted to the work you desire I should do. With my own ability I cannot succeed, without the sustenance of Divine Providence, and of this great, fre
Lincoln Reiterates (search for this): article 1
t its dreadful visitations. The masses, said the Mayor, are weary and sick of the selfish schemes and wily plots of selfish politicians, and trust in the statesmanship and patriotism of President Lincoln to restore peace and prosperity. He regretted that the short stay of the President elect precluded that intercourse with the merchants, manufacturers and mechanics of Philadelphia which would afford a clear discernment of their great interests at stake in the present troubles. Mr. Lincoln Reiterates that the Crisis is only artificial. Mr. Lincoln replied that it was true, that there was anxiety amongst the citizens of the country, but the dissatisfied, he said, are unable to point to anything in which they are being injured, or about to be injured. Hence he felt justified in concluding that the crisis was artificial. Let those who differ from me point out a substantial difficulty. He did not deny that this artificial panic had done considerable harm. He would be most happy
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