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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 23, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
Robert Lincoln, son of the President elect, who is known now as "Prince Bob," is destined to make his peculiar mark and be remembered by the people wherever he goes. --Of the many good things told of this boy in Buffalo, on Saturday, we heard the following: A few days since, when Mrs. Lincoln was on her way home from New York, attended by her son Robert, she found herself at Buffalo without a pass over the State Line Railroad. For that link in the chain of railway between New York and Springfield no provision had been made. After Mrs. Lincoln had taken her seat in the cars, at Buffalo, for the West, her son Bob entered the office of R. N. Brown, Esq., the gentlemanly Superintendent of the State Line Railroad, and inquired if Mr. Brown was in .. Mr. Brown responded and inquired what was wanted. His interrogator addressed him in substantially the following language: "My name is Bob Lincoln; I'm a son of Old Abe — the old woman is in the cars raising h — l about her passe
Sassafras Knob (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
follows: Mr. Mayor:--I thank you for the reception to your city, and would say in response, my heart is sincerely devoted to the work you desire I should do. With my own ability I cannot succeed, without the sustenance of Divine Providence, and of this great, free, happy and intelligent people. Without these I cannot hope to succeed — with these I cannot fall. Again, I return you my thanks. The President elect and the committee were then escorted to carriages, and driven to the Chestnut street depot, a distance of one mile, through Broad street, which was literally through with spectators, while every available space in the surrounding buildings was occupied. Patriotic manifestations were abundant. When the procession first formed, it was in the face of a cold and almost blinding fall of snow, which, however, soon subsided, and was succeeded by a genial sun and a bland, spring-like atmosphere, emblematic, it is hoped, of the future Administration. As the train
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): article 1
eat deliberation. Mr. Lincoln responded to the Mayor's address as follows: Mr. Lincoln's speech. Mr. Mayor--It is with feelings of deep gratitude that I make my acknowledgments for the reception extended to me by the commercial city of New York. I cannot but remember that this is done by a people, a majority of whom do not agree with me in political sentiments; and I am the more grateful because I see that in the great principles of our Government our people are very nearly, onfidence has been reposed in me; but I am sure I bring a heart devoted to the work. I am sure there is nothing that could bring me to consent, willingly to consent, to the destruction of this Union, under which not only the great commercial city of New York, but the whole country, has acquired its greatness, unless it be necessary for the preservation of the great principle for which the Union itself was made. I understand the ship to be made for the carrying of the cargo, and so long as the s
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
lied Mr. Lincoln, very soberly; and then turning to the Mayor, finished the remark by saying, "that fellow is from the country, and meant to be polite." "This is my husband," said a lady to Mr. Lincoln; "you must shake hands with him, for he is a member of the Illinois Legislature." "He might come from a worse State," replied Mr. Lincoln, taking the Illinois legislator by the hand, "but he could not have a better half." "Here is a man," said the Mayor, as a Mr. Cohen, from South Carolina advanced, "who is rather out of your bailiwick." "Here is my hand," Mr. Lincoln remarked, "we will shake hands for the Union." "You must let me shake hands with you, because I am as tall as you are," said a tall, gentlemanly-looking man. "I don't know about your being as tall," replied Mr. Lincoln, "let us measure." Mr. Lincoln wheeled his back about, and the two stood back to back. "You are an inch the tallest," exclaimed the Mayor. "I thought so," responde
Milford (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 1
ses, as he would speak officially on Monday week.--When he speaks he would take such grounds as were best calculated to restore peace, harmony and property to the country, and tend to the perpetuity of the nation, and the liberty of these States and the whole people. He assured them that he should do nothing inconsistent with the teachings of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. Mr. Lincoln then retired, and after supper held a levee. Mr. Lincoln in New Jersey. Newark, N J.,Feb. 21.--Mr. Lincoln and suite arrived at the Morris and Essex Depot in this city at 9 ½ o'clock, and was received by a committee of the Common Council, headed by the Mayor and a deputation of Republicans on horseback. On entering the depot, Mayor Bigelow addressed Mr. L. as follows: Mr. President Elect: On behalf of the Common Council and my fellow- citizens, I most cordially welcome you to our city, and tender to you its hospitalities. I welcome you, sir, on behalf of the ci
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 1
The President elect, accompanied by the Chairman of the Committee of Arrangements, the Presidents of the City Council, his suite, and the Committees of the New Jersey and Pennsylvania Legislatures, proceeded over the route fixed upon. He was hailed everywhere with patriotic emblems and manifestations. Probably not less thanent with the teachings of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. Mr. Lincoln then retired, and after supper held a levee. Mr. Lincoln in New Jersey. Newark, N J.,Feb. 21.--Mr. Lincoln and suite arrived at the Morris and Essex Depot in this city at 9 ½ o'clock, and was received by a committee of the Comm Republican journal of New York: "I have been told I look like you," remarked a tall, weasel-faced individual, the color of the mud on his boots indicating New Jersey as his residence. "You do look like me, that's certain," responded Mr. Lincoln; "the fact is settled that you are a handsome man." "How is your wife a
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 1
ing; the one allotted to Mr. Lincoln was drawn by four white horses, being conspicuous by the gay plumage on their heads. A procession was formed, headed by a body of mounted police, followed by a cavalcade of citizens, representing all party politics. The Pennsylvania Dragoons also participated in the procession. The President elect, accompanied by the Chairman of the Committee of Arrangements, the Presidents of the City Council, his suite, and the Committees of the New Jersey and Pennsylvania Legislatures, proceeded over the route fixed upon. He was hailed everywhere with patriotic emblems and manifestations. Probably not less than one hundred thousand people were gathered along the line of march. The weather was cold, threatening snow. On arriving at the headquarters selected for him, the Continental Hotel, Mr. Lincoln was conducted to the balcony?and introduced to Mayor Henry. The noisy multitude below greeted his appearance with boisterous cheering, but both the Ma
Lincoln Reiterates (search for this): article 1
t its dreadful visitations. The masses, said the Mayor, are weary and sick of the selfish schemes and wily plots of selfish politicians, and trust in the statesmanship and patriotism of President Lincoln to restore peace and prosperity. He regretted that the short stay of the President elect precluded that intercourse with the merchants, manufacturers and mechanics of Philadelphia which would afford a clear discernment of their great interests at stake in the present troubles. Mr. Lincoln Reiterates that the Crisis is only artificial. Mr. Lincoln replied that it was true, that there was anxiety amongst the citizens of the country, but the dissatisfied, he said, are unable to point to anything in which they are being injured, or about to be injured. Hence he felt justified in concluding that the crisis was artificial. Let those who differ from me point out a substantial difficulty. He did not deny that this artificial panic had done considerable harm. He would be most happy
Bob Lincoln (search for this): article 1
q., the gentlemanly Superintendent of the State Line Railroad, and inquired if Mr. Brown was in .. Mr. Brown responded and inquired what was wanted. His interrogator addressed him in substantially the following language: "My name is Bob Lincoln; I'm a son of Old Abe — the old woman is in the cars raising h — l about her passes — I wish you would go and attend to her!" Mr. Brown very promptly filled out the requisite papers to enable Mrs. Lincoln and family to ride over his road His interrogator addressed him in substantially the following language: "My name is Bob Lincoln; I'm a son of Old Abe — the old woman is in the cars raising h — l about her passes — I wish you would go and attend to her!" Mr. Brown very promptly filled out the requisite papers to enable Mrs. Lincoln and family to ride over his road without payment of fare, and delivered them to her. It is probable that " the old woman" gave Bob no further trouble about the passes on t
R. N. Brown (search for this): article 1
made. After Mrs. Lincoln had taken her seat in the cars, at Buffalo, for the West, her son Bob entered the office of R. N. Brown, Esq., the gentlemanly Superintendent of the State Line Railroad, and inquired if Mr. Brown was in .. Mr. Brown responMr. Brown was in .. Mr. Brown responded and inquired what was wanted. His interrogator addressed him in substantially the following language: "My name is Bob Lincoln; I'm a son of Old Abe — the old woman is in the cars raising h — l about her passes — I wish you would go anMr. Brown responded and inquired what was wanted. His interrogator addressed him in substantially the following language: "My name is Bob Lincoln; I'm a son of Old Abe — the old woman is in the cars raising h — l about her passes — I wish you would go and attend to her!" Mr. Brown very promptly filled out the requisite papers to enable Mrs. Lincoln and family to ride over his road without payment of fare, and delivered them to her. It is probable that " the old woman" gave Bob no further trouMr. Brown very promptly filled out the requisite papers to enable Mrs. Lincoln and family to ride over his road without payment of fare, and delivered them to her. It is probable that " the old woman" gave Bob no further trouble about the passes on t
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