hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Abraham Lincoln 94 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 38 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 34 0 Browse Search
William Hemphill Jones 23 1 Browse Search
Leonard S. Hall 22 0 Browse Search
Clemens 17 11 Browse Search
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Alabama (Alabama, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 151 total hits in 48 results.

1 2 3 4 5
ood House, as a submissionists, and read a letter from Mr. Charles W. Russell, of Wheeling, in support of his views. "The gallant old Gen. John Jackson, of Wood county, repudiated Hall and his letter before a large crowd, showing that Hall did not represent Wetzel county, much less the Northwest, having been elected only by a meagre plurality, and that through a division of the Union men of his county. The letter of Mr. Russell to Hall is reprobated by Messrs. Willey, Clemens, Jackson, Burley, and all others from the West whom I have heard speak of the affair. C." Mr.Hall then read the letter from C. W. Russell, alluded to above, to show that it was not Able to the construction placed upon it. Transportation of Negroes. Mr. Montague offered the following, which was adopted: Resolved, That the several railroad companies in this State be requested to report to the Convention, as soon as practicable, the number of negroes carried over their roads, en route for an
o adhere with patriotic devotion to the Union of these States, and that we will do so as long as the same can be perpetuated consistently with full security of all our constitutional rights and the maintenance of the equality of all the States. Resolved, That it is inexpedient and improper for the General Government to increase its forces at the forts, arsenals, and dock-yards, within the limits of Virginia, or to do any act looking to warlike preparations against this State. By Mr. Sharp, of Lee: 1st. Be it Resolved, as the sense of this body, that the Constitution of Government, and the Union, founded and established by our forefathers, having been the silent, yet prolific source of prosperity, peace and happiness to all the people of the United, and of prosperity, peace and happiness only, from its foundation to the present time, and will be for all time to come to our posterity if we are but true to the great trust reposed in us, as freemen, should not be broken
William H. Seward (search for this): article 1
on, and would not rely on such a body to afford redress for the grievances and wrongs of which the South complains, nor give such guarantees as would satisfy the people of this State that their honor and interest would obtain an effectual protection from such a Convention; but, on the contrary, that the people of the South might reasonably apprehend that such a body would reorganize the judiciary system of the United States, and make the Judges elective by the whole people of the Union, as Mr. Seward has declared his party would do as soon as they acquired the power, and that such a body would make other innovations upon the non-recognized rights of the minority section. Mr. Clemens asked if the rules did not allow him to object to any resolution on Federal Relations. The President said that under a rule adopted, all such resolutions would be referred, after they had been explained by the member offering them. Mr. Fisherthen proceeded to advocate his resolution, after wh
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 1
h. He did not intend to include, in the remarks he had made, the whole Northwest, or any considerable portion thereof.--He alluded to those two or three thousand Lincoln votes in that section, and to that portion of the people who sent members to this Convention elected upon a platform dictated by the Wheeling Intelligencer LincolLincoln's organ in the Northwest, which has a reporter upon this floor. In this connection he mentioned Messrs. Clemens and Hubbard, of Ohio. Mr. Clemens--Did I understand the gentleman to say that I stood upon a platform dictated by the Wheeling Intelligencer! Mr. Hall-- said, sir, this-- Mr. Clemens--I want a categoricaThe following resolutions were also offered, and referred to the same committee: By Mr. Whitfield, of Isle of Wight. Resolved,That the election of Abraham Lincoln to the Presidency of the United States, and the apprehensions entertained as to the policy of his administration, together with the withdrawal of the seceded
Whitfield (search for this): article 1
e minority section. Mr. Clemens asked if the rules did not allow him to object to any resolution on Federal Relations. The President said that under a rule adopted, all such resolutions would be referred, after they had been explained by the member offering them. Mr. Fisherthen proceeded to advocate his resolution, after which it was referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. The following resolutions were also offered, and referred to the same committee: By Mr. Whitfield, of Isle of Wight. Resolved,That the election of Abraham Lincoln to the Presidency of the United States, and the apprehensions entertained as to the policy of his administration, together with the withdrawal of the seceded States from the Union, having placed Virginia in great peril and embarrassment, the Convention should deliberate coolly and calmly upon the course she is to pursue for the future. Resolved. That if the Peace Congress should fail in its mission; or if the gua
t, in the parlor of the Spotswood House, as a submissionists, and read a letter from Mr. Charles W. Russell, of Wheeling, in support of his views. "The gallant old Gen. John Jackson, of Wood county, repudiated Hall and his letter before a large crowd, showing that Hall did not represent Wetzel county, much less the Northwest, having been elected only by a meagre plurality, and that through a division of the Union men of his county. The letter of Mr. Russell to Hall is reprobated by Messrs. Willey, Clemens, Jackson, Burley, and all others from the West whom I have heard speak of the affair. C." Mr.Hall then read the letter from C. W. Russell, alluded to above, to show that it was not Able to the construction placed upon it. Transportation of Negroes. Mr. Montague offered the following, which was adopted: Resolved, That the several railroad companies in this State be requested to report to the Convention, as soon as practicable, the number of negroes carried ove
n as this. He would say, however, that Virginia was in an unfortunate condition if she was afraid of fifty blue-coated men. In further remarks, he said that those who were the last to go out of the Union would be the first to fight. He wanted to stay in the Union on terms satisfactory to all our people; but if such terms could not be obtained, then go out. If Virginia did leave the Union, no consideration that could be presented to her brave people would bring her back. Mr. Early, of Franklin, fully appreciated the position of the gentleman, as an officer of the Federal Government, but could see no necessity for the adoption of the resolution.--He then alluded to the rumored proceedings at Fortress Monroe, and went on to show that the same state of things had existed there for years. In the progress of his remarks, he desired to do an act of justice to his old companions in arms, Capt. Dyer, the Command and of Artillery at Fortress Monroe, and to Maj. Anderson, the commander at
anything wrong on this floor. He went on to speak of the importance of unity among the people of Virginia on the great question now agitating the country. Mr. Carlile rose to a point of order. He was not aware that there was any question before the Convention. The President said the gentleman from Wetzel had arisen to mroceedings at Fortress Monroe, but the force at Harper's Ferry was sent at his suggestion, and that consideration took the poison from the Executive head. Mr.Carlile gave the reasons why he opposed the resolution. If he could reconcile it to a sense of duty, he would oblige his friend from Jefferson, and vote for it. But Virgion that had been artificially created, by sensation dispatches, in the minds of the people of the Commonwealth. After some further remarks by Mr. Tredway, Mr. Carlile withdrew his motion, and said he would content himself with voting "no" on the resolution. The question was then taken, and the resolution passed. Mr.
Charles W. Russell (search for this): article 1
egate from Wetzel county. He openly denounced his colleague last night, in the parlor of the Spotswood House, as a submissionists, and read a letter from Mr. Charles W. Russell, of Wheeling, in support of his views. "The gallant old Gen. John Jackson, of Wood county, repudiated Hall and his letter before a large crowd, showitzel county, much less the Northwest, having been elected only by a meagre plurality, and that through a division of the Union men of his county. The letter of Mr. Russell to Hall is reprobated by Messrs. Willey, Clemens, Jackson, Burley, and all others from the West whom I have heard speak of the affair. C." Mr.Hall then read the letter from C. W. Russell, alluded to above, to show that it was not Able to the construction placed upon it. Transportation of Negroes. Mr. Montague offered the following, which was adopted: Resolved, That the several railroad companies in this State be requested to report to the Convention, as soon as practic
e opposed the resolution. If he could reconcile it to a sense of duty, he would oblige his friend from Jefferson, and vote for it. But Virginia was still part and parcel of the Federal Government, and as a constitutional man he preferred a constitutional mode of making the investigation. It should be made by the representatives of the State, at Washington. He moved an indefinite postponement of the resolution, and called for the yeas and nays in order that he might record his vote. Mr. Harvie, of Amelia, would with great pleasure vote against indefinite postponement, and for the resolution. Not that he thought or believed that the gentleman from Jefferson had done anything improper, but because he wanted to know if the Federal Government had done anything intended to coerce Virginia into submission in the event that she should be compelled to go out of the Union. He wanted Virginia to be prepared to meet the issue. Mr.Wickham, of Henrico, opposed the indefinite postponem
1 2 3 4 5