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ould equally deprecate and condemn any attempt to take, by force of arms, from the Federal Government, by the seceding States, or any of them, any fort arsenal, navy yard, or other property, owned by and in the possession of said Federal Government, as an act of war, on the part of said seceding State or States, in which act said State or States would be the aggressor or aggressors; and that Virginia, under such circumstances, would be under no obligation to, and would not assist or support such State or States in a war produced by such act. 5th. That the unhappy differences that now distract and divide the country ought to be met in a spirit of fairness to all parties and settled in the same spirit; and that, in the opinion of this body, the Crittenden or border States resolutions do present a basis of settlement that would be fair to all parties, and satisfactory to Virginia and to the border States of this Confederacy. On motion of Mr. Preston, the Convention adjourned.
S. J. Wood (search for this): article 1
. Mr. Tredway said that the resolution was not dictated by any want of confidence in the gentleman from Jefferson as Superintendent of the Arsenal at Harper's Ferry. He believed the result would place him in the position which he never doubted he occupied, of a true and loyal Virginian. He was glad to have the information already drawn out, from the gentleman from Franklin, that the forts were commanded by men who would never do aught against the honor of the South. Mr.Jackson, of Wood, thought the Convention was taking an improper course in regard to the proposed investigation. The proper mode would be for the Executive of the Commonwealth to obtain the desired information by making a respectful communication to the President of the United States. The course proposed by the resolution indicated an indefinite prolongation of the session. He moved to lay it on the table, but withdrew the motion at the request of. Mr. Barbour, of Jefferson, who said that the debate ha
nment, to any fort or arsenal in, or bordering upon, Virginia, indicating a preparation for attack or coercion. Mr.Barbour, of Jefferson, regretted that his absence should have caused such a resolution to be laid upon the table, for it met hist they were opposed to a Union which did not furnish equal protection to all. He hoped the resolution would pass. Mr. Barbour said he had no disposition to figure in the local papers at home, and did not propose to discuss the great subject of heir guns at their own countrymen, every shot would wring their hearts; but they would do their duty to the last. Mr. Barbour of Culpeper, made a statement as an act of justice to the Superintendent of the Arsenal at Harper's Ferry, showing thaefinite prolongation of the session. He moved to lay it on the table, but withdrew the motion at the request of. Mr. Barbour, of Jefferson, who said that the debate had taken such a course that he hoped the investigation would be made. He kne
Jefferson (search for this): article 1
quire and report as speedily as possible, whether any movement of arms or men has been made by the General Government, to any fort or arsenal in, or bordering upon, Virginia, indicating a preparation for attack or coercion. Mr.Barbour, of Jefferson, regretted that his absence should have caused such a resolution to be laid upon the table, for it met his cordial approbation. Occupying, as he did, the position of Superintendent of the Arsenal at Harper's Ferry, he was anxious that the peopl communication to the President of the United States. The course proposed by the resolution indicated an indefinite prolongation of the session. He moved to lay it on the table, but withdrew the motion at the request of. Mr. Barbour, of Jefferson, who said that the debate had taken such a course that he hoped the investigation would be made. He knew naught of the proceedings at Fortress Monroe, but the force at Harper's Ferry was sent at his suggestion, and that consideration took the
n order that he might record his vote. Mr. Harvie, of Amelia, would with great pleasure vote against indefinite postponement, and for the resolution. Not that he thought or believed that the gentleman from Jefferson had done anything improper, but because he wanted to know if the Federal Government had done anything intended to coerce Virginia into submission in the event that she should be compelled to go out of the Union. He wanted Virginia to be prepared to meet the issue. Mr.Wickham, of Henrico, opposed the indefinite postponement of the resolution. He had good reason to believe that there were fewer United States soldiers in Virginia now than on the 6th of November. He wanted to have the public mind quieted on the subject, and to allay an agitation that had been artificially created, by sensation dispatches, in the minds of the people of the Commonwealth. After some further remarks by Mr. Tredway, Mr. Carlile withdrew his motion, and said he would content himse
portion of the people who sent members to this Convention elected upon a platform dictated by the Wheeling Intelligencer Lincoln's organ in the Northwest, which has a reporter upon this floor. In this connection he mentioned Messrs. Clemens and Hubbard, of Ohio. Mr. Clemens--Did I understand the gentleman to say that I stood upon a platform dictated by the Wheeling Intelligencer! Mr. Hall-- said, sir, this-- Mr. Clemens--I want a categorical answer to my question. Mr.Hall.- and violated our laws by sending documents to the negroes of the Commonwealth to stir up insurrection. He had not read Mr. Clemens' speech; he was not in the habit of reading speeches, for he had matters of more importance to attend to. Mr. Hubbard, of Ohio, replied to the remarks of the member from Wetzel. He denied that he was elected on a platform dictated by the Wheeling Intelligencer, and read his address to his constituents to show the position he occupied. He affirmed his loyalt
George W. Nolley (search for this): article 1
Virginia State Convention.Ninth day. Saturday,Feb. 23, 1861. The Convention was called to order by the President, at 12 o'clock. Prayer by the Rev. Geo. W. Nolley of the M. E. Church. Personal explanation. Mr.Hall, of Wetzel, arose to make a personal explanation, in regard to his remarks on Thursday, which had been made the subject of newspaper criticism, as well as comment by gentlemen from the Northwest. He had been represented as saying that the whole Northwest was unsound; in other words, that they were not true representatives of Virginia sentiment, and not loyal to the Commonwealth. He did not intend to include, in the remarks he had made, the whole Northwest, or any considerable portion thereof.--He alluded to those two or three thousand Lincoln votes in that section, and to that portion of the people who sent members to this Convention elected upon a platform dictated by the Wheeling Intelligencer Lincoln's organ in the Northwest, which has a reporter
Leonard S. Hall (search for this): article 1
M. E. Church. Personal explanation. Mr.Hall, of Wetzel, arose to make a personal explanatio dictated by the Wheeling Intelligencer! Mr. Hall-- said, sir, this-- Mr. Clemens--I want a categorical answer to my question. Mr.Hall.--I said this: that he ran upon a platform of reso--That is not an answer to my question. Mr.Hall--It is all you will get from me. Mr. Clemelude to the position occupied by others. Mr. Hall said he had no disposition to misrepresent thmbers on account of the course pursued by Leonard S. Hall, delegate from Wetzel county. He openly d Gen. John Jackson, of Wood county, repudiated Hall and his letter before a large crowd, showing that Hall did not represent Wetzel county, much less the Northwest, having been elected only by a meagen of his county. The letter of Mr. Russell to Hall is reprobated by Messrs. Willey, Clemens, Jacksm I have heard speak of the affair. C." Mr.Hall then read the letter from C. W. Russell, allude[1 more...]
Philip Harrison (search for this): article 1
, and by conciliation and compromise pursue that course which will produce harmony and prevent discord among ourselves. ResolvedThat in the judgment of this Convention, this Commonwealth should resist, with all her means, any attempt to coerce a seceded State. Resolved,That if the force of events shall present the alternative to Virginia of uniting either with the North or the South, in the opinion of this Convention her true position will be with the latter. By Mr. Wilson of Harrison: Resolved,That we, the people of Virginia, in Convention assembled, do adhere with patriotic devotion to the Union of these States, and that we will do so as long as the same can be perpetuated consistently with full security of all our constitutional rights and the maintenance of the equality of all the States. Resolved, That it is inexpedient and improper for the General Government to increase its forces at the forts, arsenals, and dock-yards, within the limits of Virginia, or
th patriotic devotion to the Union of these States, and that we will do so as long as the same can be perpetuated consistently with full security of all our constitutional rights and the maintenance of the equality of all the States. Resolved, That it is inexpedient and improper for the General Government to increase its forces at the forts, arsenals, and dock-yards, within the limits of Virginia, or to do any act looking to warlike preparations against this State. By Mr. Sharp, of Lee: 1st. Be it Resolved, as the sense of this body, that the Constitution of Government, and the Union, founded and established by our forefathers, having been the silent, yet prolific source of prosperity, peace and happiness to all the people of the United, and of prosperity, peace and happiness only, from its foundation to the present time, and will be for all time to come to our posterity if we are but true to the great trust reposed in us, as freemen, should not be broken up and dest
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