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Orange County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
upon measures to save the country. He proceeded to pay further compliments to South Carolina and the gallantry of her people, and vindicated them from the charge of want of proper respect and courtesy to the Virginia Commissioner, (Judge Robertson.) He presumed that by this time the Convention was satisfied that he thought the proper course was for Virginia to secede forthwith. If there was any doubt upon that subject, he would read some resolutions offered by himself in the county of Orange, on the 24th of Dec., 1860. The resolutions took the ground that the Union of the South is the safety of the South, and that Virginia ought to go out with her Southern sisters before the 4th of March. He thought if that advice had been followed, we should not now have heard one word about coercion. Whilst wrongs and insults had been heaped upon Virginia mountains high, she was still here deliberating whether she should go North or South. He would have had a conference of the fifteen slave
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): article 1
h the South, he would erect a breakwater, and she should keep her negroes — they should multiply on her hands — until she felt enough interested in the institution to defend it. He reiterated the assurance of the Southern Commissioners that the African slave trade would not be reopened. He had mingled much with the people of the South, and no people were possessed of higher moral integrity. He had never seen there a single African, although they were imported by cargoes to the coast of Cuba. If the business had ever been carried on in the Southern States, it was done on a far greater scale by the smuggling Yankees of the North. With regard to the difficulty of transit alluded to, in case Virginia went with the South, he believed that Fortress Monroe and the Rip Raps would belong to Virginia. He would rally under the lead of the gentleman near him (Mr. Wise,) and pluck the plume from the brow of the Lieutenant General.--He anticipated none of the difficulties spoken of by
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
With every Department in the hands of the Black Republican party, and administered upon the plan dictated by Wm. H. Seward, how long would Virginia be safe? Under the distribution of the official patronage, how long would it be before a man might come to think the wrong the better side? If we stay together for twelve months, he thought there would be most beneficent showers of patronage upon Virginia, Maryland, and Tennessee--he would not go so far as North Carolina--and upon Kentucky and Missouri. Those who accepted the gifts would form a nucleus of acquiescence in the powers that be, and in the next election, or the next but one, we should have Black Republican orators on every stump, and where would Virginia's safety be? There might be those who thought he was for throwing away the treasure of the Union. He would tell them that in the last election he voted for Bell and Everett, but did so upon the declaration that if the Charleston Convention had made a nomination he would
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
, and how long would it be before they would secure the Judiciary, also? With every Department in the hands of the Black Republican party, and administered upon the plan dictated by Wm. H. Seward, how long would Virginia be safe? Under the distribution of the official patronage, how long would it be before a man might come to think the wrong the better side? If we stay together for twelve months, he thought there would be most beneficent showers of patronage upon Virginia, Maryland, and Tennessee--he would not go so far as North Carolina--and upon Kentucky and Missouri. Those who accepted the gifts would form a nucleus of acquiescence in the powers that be, and in the next election, or the next but one, we should have Black Republican orators on every stump, and where would Virginia's safety be? There might be those who thought he was for throwing away the treasure of the Union. He would tell them that in the last election he voted for Bell and Everett, but did so upon the de
Orange, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 1
order at 12 o'clock. Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Burrows, of the First Baptist Church. The President stated that the unfinished business of yesterday, (the resolutions of the gentleman from Rockbridge,) was now in order — the gentleman from Orange (Mr. Morton) being entitled to the floor. Mr. Morton said he would give way a moment for the gentleman from Hanover, who desired to offer a resolution. Mr. Richardson, of Hanover, submitted the following: Resolved, That in further questions which involve her vital interest. He had heard it said outside of this hall, as well as in it — he believed it had been said today — that Virginia ought not to hesitate, but go out at once. He believed he heard the gentleman from Orange say this, and he asked him if he understood him right. Mr. Morton.--You did, sir. Mr. Baylor.--Go out for what? He wanted gentlemen to state their reasons. Nothing had been said yet sufficient to satisfy him that there was any good re
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
would not be reopened. He had mingled much with the people of the South, and no people were possessed of higher moral integrity. He had never seen there a single African, although they were imported by cargoes to the coast of Cuba. If the business had ever been carried on in the Southern States, it was done on a far greater scale by the smuggling Yankees of the North. With regard to the difficulty of transit alluded to, in case Virginia went with the South, he believed that Fortress Monroe and the Rip Raps would belong to Virginia. He would rally under the lead of the gentleman near him (Mr. Wise,) and pluck the plume from the brow of the Lieutenant General.--He anticipated none of the difficulties spoken of by others. He again urged the necessity of secession.--Where were the interests of Virginia in a Northern Confederacy, when for thirty years they had been warring upon her and her institutions? If he were to agree to a union with the North, he would consider hi
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
would secure the Judiciary, also? With every Department in the hands of the Black Republican party, and administered upon the plan dictated by Wm. H. Seward, how long would Virginia be safe? Under the distribution of the official patronage, how long would it be before a man might come to think the wrong the better side? If we stay together for twelve months, he thought there would be most beneficent showers of patronage upon Virginia, Maryland, and Tennessee--he would not go so far as North Carolina--and upon Kentucky and Missouri. Those who accepted the gifts would form a nucleus of acquiescence in the powers that be, and in the next election, or the next but one, we should have Black Republican orators on every stump, and where would Virginia's safety be? There might be those who thought he was for throwing away the treasure of the Union. He would tell them that in the last election he voted for Bell and Everett, but did so upon the declaration that if the Charleston Convent
Fort Bedford (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 1
a moral, social and political evil, and he regretted the expressions that indicated similar opinions still. He next alluded to the remarks of the gentleman from Bedford, (Mr. Goggin,) and welcomed the sentiment that when it comes to coercion, he would be found fighting under the flag of Virginia. But they had not dwelt sufficien yet she was blamed for not seeking the counsel of Virginia. He besought the gentleman from Rockbridge, and the gentleman from Rockbridge, and the gentleman from Bedford, not to blame South Carolina and Mississippi, but to blame Virginia. If she had gone into counsel with them when they did seek it, the present calamities would hhem, he would settle it in an hour. [Sensation.] He went on to consider the question, what shall Virginia do? He had with pleasure heard the gentleman from Bedford (Mr. Goggin) say that in the final event of a separation he would wrap himself in the folds of the flag of Virginia, and perish with her, if she must perish. But
Virginia mountains (Nevada, United States) (search for this): article 1
nia to secede forthwith. If there was any doubt upon that subject, he would read some resolutions offered by himself in the county of Orange, on the 24th of Dec., 1860. The resolutions took the ground that the Union of the South is the safety of the South, and that Virginia ought to go out with her Southern sisters before the 4th of March. He thought if that advice had been followed, we should not now have heard one word about coercion. Whilst wrongs and insults had been heaped upon Virginia mountains high, she was still here deliberating whether she should go North or South. He would have had a conference of the fifteen slave States, from which he would not have excluded all the free States, but would have admitted some of the border States, whose interests at least would have been with the South; but if they could not have been purified by the association, he would have relinquished them. Such a consultation would have led to a result calculated to secure the peace of the countr
McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 1
e unfinished business of yesterday, (the resolutions of the gentleman from Rockbridge,) was now in order — the gentleman from Orange (Mr. Morton) being entitled to the floor. Mr. Morton said he would give way a moment for the gentleman from Hanover, who desired to offer a resolution. Mr. Richardson, of Hanover, submitted the following: Resolved, That in furtherance of the resolution adopted by this Convention on the 20th inst., seeking information of the Governor regarding the mHanover, submitted the following: Resolved, That in furtherance of the resolution adopted by this Convention on the 20th inst., seeking information of the Governor regarding the militia, the Adjutant General of the State be, and he is hereby requested, to communicate to this body, as speedily as is compatible with a thorough report on this subject, how many and what kind of arms are in the possession of the state, undistributed, and the number and kind of additional companies which can and will, probably, shortly be armed. Also, at what points, in his judgment, having due reference to the localities of the different companies, and to economy in time and money, the whol
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