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o the Scotch cap of the Camerous and the long military cloak, in which undignified disguise he reached the Federal capital with a whole skin. No sooner did Mr. Fouche Kennedy succeed in discovering this awful conspiracy than he turned up at Washington, in search of an office, we suppose, to which he is undoubtedly entitled at the hands of Mr. Lincoln, whose life he so miraculously preserved. The Southern Confederacy. The Montgomery correspondent of the Columbus Times, writing on the 25th, sends the following intelligence: The following advertisement from the Advertiser of yesterday morning, will show that the Treasury branch of the Government is now in operation. H. D. Capers, I learn, is Chief Clerk: Confederate States of America, Treasury Department, Montgomery, February 23, 1861. This Department is now ready for the transaction of business. The Secretary will be found at the Executive Building, corner of Commerce and Bibb streets. Gen. Davis
February 11th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 1
ommissioners to the Peace Conference at Washington, and suggesting themselves as proper candidates for the appointment, has already been stated. The Governor it appears has abused the confidence reposed in him by allowing the modest and patriotic correspondence of these gentlemen to be made public.--Both letters appear in the Detroit Free Press; both are to the same effect. That of Senator Chandler being the briefest and most pointed of the two, we publish it below: Washington, Feb. 11, 1861. My Dear Governor --Governor Bingham and myself telegraphed you on Saturday; at the request of Massachusetts and New York, to send delegates to the Peace or Compromise Congress. They admit that we were right, and they wrong; that no Republican State should have sent delegates; but they are here and can't get away. Ohio, Indiana and Rhode Island are caving in, and there is danger of Illinois and now they beg us, for God's sake, to come to their rescue and save the Republican party
February 23rd, 1861 AD (search for this): article 1
tedly entitled at the hands of Mr. Lincoln, whose life he so miraculously preserved. The Southern Confederacy. The Montgomery correspondent of the Columbus Times, writing on the 25th, sends the following intelligence: The following advertisement from the Advertiser of yesterday morning, will show that the Treasury branch of the Government is now in operation. H. D. Capers, I learn, is Chief Clerk: Confederate States of America, Treasury Department, Montgomery, February 23, 1861. This Department is now ready for the transaction of business. The Secretary will be found at the Executive Building, corner of Commerce and Bibb streets. Gen. Davis on yesterday attended divine service at the Episcopal Church. I learn that the President daily receives letters from Maine, Connecticut, and other New England States, which, doubtless, contain terrible threats, with a view of menacing and scaring the Southern Government. Fortunately, Mr. Davis is not the man
Armstrong (search for this): article 1
have influenced their own selection. Such men are Hon. C. G. Memminger, of South Carolina, and Hon. L. P. Walker, of Alabama, gentlemen who have ever exhibited an independence of party in emergencies requiring devotion to their country lone. Captain Armstrong. The result of the Court of Inquiry in the matter of Capt. Armstrong has been the ordering a Court-Martial for his trial for surrendering the Navy-Yard at Pensacola. The officers to compose the Court have not yet been named. have influenced their own selection. Such men are Hon. C. G. Memminger, of South Carolina, and Hon. L. P. Walker, of Alabama, gentlemen who have ever exhibited an independence of party in emergencies requiring devotion to their country lone. Captain Armstrong. The result of the Court of Inquiry in the matter of Capt. Armstrong has been the ordering a Court-Martial for his trial for surrendering the Navy-Yard at Pensacola. The officers to compose the Court have not yet been named.
. The Columbus (Geo.) Enquirer is not satisfied with the Cabinet appointments of "President" Davis. It says they are objectionable on the score of their exclusive party character: Every member of the Cabinet, we believe, was a Breckinridge Democrat and an original Secessionist. The Bell and Douglas men have been entirely excluded from a share in the administration of the new Government.--Even such men as George W. Crawford, of Georgia, and Thomas H. Watts, of Alabama, who supported Bell but sustained secession as soon as it was made an issue, are passed by, and politicians of less ability and influence with the people selected. Presenting, as the Bell and Douglas men did, such fine material for Cabinet appointments, their total exclusion cannot be regarded other wise than as proscription on account of their course previous to the secession issue. The new Government, we believe, has made a great error by this exclusive promotion of a particular party — a party that was in a
James B. Bingham (search for this): article 1
erence with his friends, and, it is said, the appeal of Judge Douglas was the subject under discussion. What the result will be, does it appear as late as to-day soon. A Northern Senator on record. The fact that Senators Chandler and Bingham, of Michigan, had telegraphed and afterwards written to Governor Blair, of that State, desiring him if possible to have the Legislature reconsider its refusal to appoint Commissioners to the Peace Conference at Washington, and suggesting themsele public.--Both letters appear in the Detroit Free Press; both are to the same effect. That of Senator Chandler being the briefest and most pointed of the two, we publish it below: Washington, Feb. 11, 1861. My Dear Governor --Governor Bingham and myself telegraphed you on Saturday; at the request of Massachusetts and New York, to send delegates to the Peace or Compromise Congress. They admit that we were right, and they wrong; that no Republican State should have sent delegates;
Austin Blair (search for this): article 1
as was the subject under discussion. What the result will be, does it appear as late as to-day soon. A Northern Senator on record. The fact that Senators Chandler and Bingham, of Michigan, had telegraphed and afterwards written to Governor Blair, of that State, desiring him if possible to have the Legislature reconsider its refusal to appoint Commissioners to the Peace Conference at Washington, and suggesting themselves as proper candidates for the appointment, has already been state The whole thing was gotten up against my judgment and advice, and will end in thin smoke. Still, I hope, as a matter of courtesy to some of our erring brethren, that you will send the delegates. Z. Chandler. Truly, your friend, His Excellency Austin Blair. P. S.--Some of the manufacturing States think that a fight would be awful. Without a little blood letting this Union will not, in my estimation, be worth a rush How the Conspiracy against Lincoln was discovered. The New York He
H. D. Capers (search for this): article 1
ering this awful conspiracy than he turned up at Washington, in search of an office, we suppose, to which he is undoubtedly entitled at the hands of Mr. Lincoln, whose life he so miraculously preserved. The Southern Confederacy. The Montgomery correspondent of the Columbus Times, writing on the 25th, sends the following intelligence: The following advertisement from the Advertiser of yesterday morning, will show that the Treasury branch of the Government is now in operation. H. D. Capers, I learn, is Chief Clerk: Confederate States of America, Treasury Department, Montgomery, February 23, 1861. This Department is now ready for the transaction of business. The Secretary will be found at the Executive Building, corner of Commerce and Bibb streets. Gen. Davis on yesterday attended divine service at the Episcopal Church. I learn that the President daily receives letters from Maine, Connecticut, and other New England States, which, doubtless, contain
Z. Chandler (search for this): article 1
las was the subject under discussion. What the result will be, does it appear as late as to-day soon. A Northern Senator on record. The fact that Senators Chandler and Bingham, of Michigan, had telegraphed and afterwards written to Governor Blair, of that State, desiring him if possible to have the Legislature reconsidedest and patriotic correspondence of these gentlemen to be made public.--Both letters appear in the Detroit Free Press; both are to the same effect. That of Senator Chandler being the briefest and most pointed of the two, we publish it below: Washington, Feb. 11, 1861. My Dear Governor --Governor Bingham and myself my judgment and advice, and will end in thin smoke. Still, I hope, as a matter of courtesy to some of our erring brethren, that you will send the delegates. Z. Chandler. Truly, your friend, His Excellency Austin Blair. P. S.--Some of the manufacturing States think that a fight would be awful. Without a little blood letting thi
— interview between Senator Douglas and Mr. Lincoln--the Southern Confederacy--a Northern Senator on record — the Lincoln conspiracy, &c. The debate in Congress on the Corwin amendment. When the motion to reconsider the vote rejecting Mr. Corwin's amendment to the report of the Committee of Thirty-Three, was made in the House of Representatives, Thursday-- Mr. Kilgore, who moved the motion, called the attention of his Republican friends to the importance of the vote they were now at the noise was owing to the large number of strangers on the floor, whilst others charged the disorder to members themselves. The Speaker directed the Doorkeeper to perform his duty. The question was then taken, and the vote rejecting Mr. Corwin's proposed amendment to the Constitution reconsidered — yeas 128, nays 65. Interview between Senator Douglas and Mr. Lincoln. A Washington dispatch to the New York Herald gives the following particulars of an interview between Senator <
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