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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 5 total hits in 3 results.

Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 2
Father vs. Son. --The Boston Courier produces the following extract from an oration delivered in Boston on the 4th of July, 1808, by the father of Charles Sumner. The son of his father had better read it: There is indeed no diversity of interest between the people of the South; and they are no friends to either who endeavor to stimulate and embitter the one against the other. What if the sons of Massachusetts rank high on the roll of revolutionary fame? The wisdom and heroism for which they have been distinguished will never permit them to indulge in inglorious boast. The independence and liberty we possess are the results of joint counsels and joint efforts — of common dangers, sufferings, and successes; and God forbid that those who have every motive of sympathy and interest to act in concert, should ever become the prey of party bickering among themselves.
Charles Sumner (search for this): article 2
Father vs. Son. --The Boston Courier produces the following extract from an oration delivered in Boston on the 4th of July, 1808, by the father of Charles Sumner. The son of his father had better read it: There is indeed no diversity of interest between the people of the South; and they are no friends to either who endeavor to stimulate and embitter the one against the other. What if the sons of Massachusetts rank high on the roll of revolutionary fame? The wisdom and heroism for which they have been distinguished will never permit them to indulge in inglorious boast. The independence and liberty we possess are the results of joint counsels and joint efforts — of common dangers, sufferings, and successes; and God forbid that those who have every motive of sympathy and interest to act in concert, should ever become the prey of party bickering among themselves.
July 4th, 1808 AD (search for this): article 2
Father vs. Son. --The Boston Courier produces the following extract from an oration delivered in Boston on the 4th of July, 1808, by the father of Charles Sumner. The son of his father had better read it: There is indeed no diversity of interest between the people of the South; and they are no friends to either who endeavor to stimulate and embitter the one against the other. What if the sons of Massachusetts rank high on the roll of revolutionary fame? The wisdom and heroism for which they have been distinguished will never permit them to indulge in inglorious boast. The independence and liberty we possess are the results of joint counsels and joint efforts — of common dangers, sufferings, and successes; and God forbid that those who have every motive of sympathy and interest to act in concert, should ever become the prey of party bickering among themselves.