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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 5, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
erred to the Committee on Federal Relations: Resolved, That the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Maryland and Delaware, ought to meet in Convention, with a view to concerted and united action, to determine where they will go, whether with the North or the South--or whether they will establish a Central Confederacy. The Southern Commissioners. The President laid before the Convention copies of the addresses delivered by the Commissioners from South Carolina, Georgia and Mississippi, furnished by themselves for publication in compliance with a resolution of this body. Mr. Goode, of Bedford, offered a resolution calling for the printing of 10,000 copies of the addresses, to be distributed equally among the members, for circulation. Mr. E. B. Hall moved to lay the resolution on the table, and on this motion Mr. Goode called for the yeas and nays. The vote was then taken, and resulted — years 64, nays 42. So the resolution to pri
Harrison, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
etiring process had much to do with the secession excitement. With regard to the Peace Conference, gentlemen had condemned it by resolutions before its action had been officially reported to this body. Such hot haste he considered disrespectful to the Commissioners. The proposition of the Peace Conference commended itself to him, and he believed it would to the people also. Mr. Leare, of Goochland, inquired if there was any question before the Convention. If not, the gentleman from Harrison was out of order. Mr. Carlile said if any gentleman objected to his going on, he would take his seat. Mr. Mallory, of Brunswick, (by leave,) offered the following, which was referred to the Committee on Federal Relations: Resolved, That the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Maryland and Delaware, ought to meet in Convention, with a view to concerted and united action, to determine where they will go, whether with the North or the South--or whe
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
m, and he believed it would to the people also. Mr. Leare, of Goochland, inquired if there was any question before the Convention. If not, the gentleman from Harrison was out of order. Mr. Carlile said if any gentleman objected to his going on, he would take his seat. Mr. Mallory, of Brunswick, (by leave,) offered the following, which was referred to the Committee on Federal Relations: Resolved, That the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Maryland and Delaware, ought to meet in Convention, with a view to concerted and united action, to determine where they will go, whether with the North or the South--or whether they will establish a Central Confederacy. The Southern Commissioners. The President laid before the Convention copies of the addresses delivered by the Commissioners from South Carolina, Georgia and Mississippi, furnished by themselves for publication in compliance with a resolution of this body. Mr. Goode, of B
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 1
ed. In conclusion he returned his thanks for the attention which had been given to his remarks. Personal explanation. Mr. Baylor arose to a personal explanation, and proceeded to correct a misrepresentation of his remarks a few days ago, in some newspaper, (the reporter could not hear the name,) relative to the responsibility of the Black Republicans for the John Brown raid. He had not said that Black Republican men were not responsible for it, but that the party was not. The Chicago platform did not endorse the John Brown raid, but denounced it. If they had endorsed it in their platform, they never could have elected Lincoln or any one else upon it. The Richmond Enquirer had said that no man would endorse the Peace Conference proposition, unless he were himself a Black Republican. He would say to the editors that he endorsed it, and he was no more a Black Republican than they were. He was a slaveholder, and represented a slaveholding constituency. Mr. B. went on to
Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
nment to corrupt Virginia. This was an argument that he would not dare to use before his people, and would only say in reply that if Virginia was of such easy virtue as to be corrupted by a little Federal pap, her honor was not worth preserving. The speaker adverted briefly to the John Brown raid, in regard to which the dignity of the State had been vindicated. If the State seceded, her border would be constantly exposed to such raids. In reply to the position of the gentleman from Middlesex, who had read from Washington's Farewell Address to show that the experiment of Government had failed, he alluded to the vastness of the American empire, and thought if we were true to ourselves we were but on the threshold of our greatness. He then proceeded to allude to the evils to result from secession. The country would not only be divided into a Northern and a Southern Confederacy, but in course of time it would be divided into petty Confederacies, and then would come constant
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
the Peace Conference commended itself to him, and he believed it would to the people also. Mr. Leare, of Goochland, inquired if there was any question before the Convention. If not, the gentleman from Harrison was out of order. Mr. Carlile said if any gentleman objected to his going on, he would take his seat. Mr. Mallory, of Brunswick, (by leave,) offered the following, which was referred to the Committee on Federal Relations: Resolved, That the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Maryland and Delaware, ought to meet in Convention, with a view to concerted and united action, to determine where they will go, whether with the North or the South--or whether they will establish a Central Confederacy. The Southern Commissioners. The President laid before the Convention copies of the addresses delivered by the Commissioners from South Carolina, Georgia and Mississippi, furnished by themselves for publication in compliance with a r
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
self to him, and he believed it would to the people also. Mr. Leare, of Goochland, inquired if there was any question before the Convention. If not, the gentleman from Harrison was out of order. Mr. Carlile said if any gentleman objected to his going on, he would take his seat. Mr. Mallory, of Brunswick, (by leave,) offered the following, which was referred to the Committee on Federal Relations: Resolved, That the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Maryland and Delaware, ought to meet in Convention, with a view to concerted and united action, to determine where they will go, whether with the North or the South--or whether they will establish a Central Confederacy. The Southern Commissioners. The President laid before the Convention copies of the addresses delivered by the Commissioners from South Carolina, Georgia and Mississippi, furnished by themselves for publication in compliance with a resolution of this body. Mr. G
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 1
an example in the South American empire. Another result would be the commencement of the abolition of slavery, first in Virginia, and ultimately in the whole South. This was the idea of Sumner, Phillips and Garrison.--They wanted to draw a belt of fire around us. Whether it be right or wrong, the moral sentiment of the world was against slavery, and the force of all would be exerted against it.--Entangling foreign alliances would be another evil result. If the Union is dissolved, too, Great Britain could conquer the South, and she had no means of preventing it. He said it was a very easy thing to pull down this Government, but very difficult to build it up again. As to the question where shall Virginia go, he said he would go nowhere, but stay where we are, and plant the State firmly upon the Constitution. The perils of the new Government at the South were alluded to. The provisional Constitution had no force derived from the people; but they were going to work to make a permanen
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
ny able men here think, and as many able judges decided, that there was no constitutional right of secession, the remedy can have no weight with a constitution-loving people. If 100% proper construction of the Federal Constitution justifies secession, we have never had a Union at all; and if the position could be maintained, he was willing that the principle of law should be brought to bear upon such an illicit intercourse. He would admit at such right. He alluded to the purchase of Louisiana and Texas. He could never believe that the Government would have expended such a vast amount for that purpose, if they were to be allowed to walk off with the spoils at their own pleasure. If the doctrine were true, in my hour of trial, a State may go out of the Union, leave those with whom she had been allied and join the enemy, or go out at her convenience, and leave the debt incurred by war for the other States to pay. The right of State to secede was spurned from the Con of Virginia,
Orange, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 1
e. He deplored the election of Lincoln, or any other sectional President; but he should oppose him with the weapons of reason, and when they failed it was time enough to resort to the ultima ratio. Again, it was said that we were in a minority. Our "Southern sisters," as they were called, were responsible for this. They had left us in this minority, in defiance of our remonstrances, and left us to be trodden under the heel of Black Republicanism. It was alleged by the gentleman from Orange that the honor of Virginia required that she should secede. He believed her honor required that she should contend for her rights, and not yield an inch to her enemies. It had also been said that Lincoln would use the patronage of the Federal Government to corrupt Virginia. This was an argument that he would not dare to use before his people, and would only say in reply that if Virginia was of such easy virtue as to be corrupted by a little Federal pap, her honor was not worth preserving.
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