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Halifax (Canada) (search for this): article 1
dared to acknowledge the right of the secession of States. He next alluded to Mr. Goggin as a member of the Whig Convention which adopted a platform for the preservation of the Union and the Constitution — and he believed the gentleman from Halifax (Mr. Flournoy) stood there also. They backed up Mr. Fillmore, as he did, in enforcing the laws in Boston; but now when they were to be enforced on this side of the line, it was a very different thing. His people were a law-abiding people; devocivil war, he had offered his resolution in the hope of preventing that calamity. The moment coercion is attempted, the Union will be broken up. He did not intend to discuss the question of coercion. It was ably discussed by the gentleman from Halifax, (Mr. Flournoy,) every word of whose speech he endorsed. His resolution proposed to call a conference of the border States, in order that Virginia might consult with them as to what ought to be done. If the gentleman from Harrison was a Union
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
yet we wanted expansion! Slavery was governed by soil, by climate, by interests; and where those were adverse, it would not go. South Carolina spurned the causes which were alleged here for a dissolution of the Union. The present secession movement was initiated in South Carolina, where they never lost a slave. South Carolina tells you frankly it is because of the "irrepressible conflict" between free and slave labor. The doctrine of the right of a State to secede originated in Massachusetts, the hot-bed of all the "isms," in 1807, because of the embargo. In 1808 the electors met in this city to east their votes for Madison as President, and one of the regular toasts at the electoral dinner was, "The Union of the States--the majority must govern--'tis treason to secede. " But the doctrine of secession was still agitated in the New England States, and the Richmond Enquirer held that it was treason to all intents and purposes. --Madison's letters were referred to as putting h
Chesterfield (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
, in order that Virginia might consult with them as to what ought to be done. If the gentleman from Harrison was a Union man he would go for such a conference. The Peace Conference, inaugurated by Virginia, had proved an abortion, and she can now do nothing by herself; but in concert with the Border States, much might be done. Tennessee and North Carolina had voted against Conventions of their people; Kentucky and Maryland had taken no action, and there was no indication of a movement in Missouri. It was due to them and to Virginia that there should be a conference. He condemned the hasty action of South Carolina and would condemn it in Virginia. But the people were in a state of feverish excitement, and wanted action on the subject of coercion. He called for a vote on the resolutions. Mr. Brent, of Alexandria, moved that the Convention adjourn; and on that motion Mr. Cox, of Chesterfield, called for the yeas and nays, but withdrew it. The Convention then adjourned.
Patrick Henry (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
nly convinced the people of what they thought before — that they were not suitable representatives of popular sentiment. All the power in this country is in the people. It has for a time been usnrped; but as sure as the sun shines in yonder sky, that power will yet rebuke the effort to overthrow and destroy the best fabric of free government that ever existed upon earth. He commended to his hearers a perusal of the 39th number of the Federalist; and went on to allude to the efforts of Patrick Henry, George Mason, Luther Martin, and other patriots, to lay the foundation of a Government for a free people. It is amazing that with so many sources from whence we can derive the purposes of the Federal Government, gentlemen will get up and contend for a principle for which they can find no argument. No man contends for the power of coercion. --Why, then, continue to build cob-houses, that a breath can knock down? Is there anything in the Inaugural to justify the assertion that it breat
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
, in order that Virginia might consult with them as to what ought to be done. If the gentleman from Harrison was a Union man he would go for such a conference. The Peace Conference, inaugurated by Virginia, had proved an abortion, and she can now do nothing by herself; but in concert with the Border States, much might be done. Tennessee and North Carolina had voted against Conventions of their people; Kentucky and Maryland had taken no action, and there was no indication of a movement in Missouri. It was due to them and to Virginia that there should be a conference. He condemned the hasty action of South Carolina and would condemn it in Virginia. But the people were in a state of feverish excitement, and wanted action on the subject of coercion. He called for a vote on the resolutions. Mr. Brent, of Alexandria, moved that the Convention adjourn; and on that motion Mr. Cox, of Chesterfield, called for the yeas and nays, but withdrew it. The Convention then adjourned.
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
s; and where those were adverse, it would not go. South Carolina spurned the causes which were alleged here for a dissonion. The present secession movement was initiated in South Carolina, where they never lost a slave. South Carolina tells South Carolina tells you frankly it is because of the "irrepressible conflict" between free and slave labor. The doctrine of the right of a Stat compact — a violation of faith. The Supreme Court of South Carolina had also denied the legality and constitutionality of our revenues in New York, but must not collect them in South Carolina. He then read from the writings of Henry Clay, to shossion as treason. Secession was a Yankee notion. South Carolina had given the true definition — it was the doctrine ofe feast to which the people of Virginia were invited. South Carolina initiated this movement, and would control it, if a gould be a conference. He condemned the hasty action of South Carolina and would condemn it in Virginia. But the people were
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
ndorsed. His resolution proposed to call a conference of the border States, in order that Virginia might consult with them as to what ought to be done. If the gentleman from Harrison was a Union man he would go for such a conference. The Peace Conference, inaugurated by Virginia, had proved an abortion, and she can now do nothing by herself; but in concert with the Border States, much might be done. Tennessee and North Carolina had voted against Conventions of their people; Kentucky and Maryland had taken no action, and there was no indication of a movement in Missouri. It was due to them and to Virginia that there should be a conference. He condemned the hasty action of South Carolina and would condemn it in Virginia. But the people were in a state of feverish excitement, and wanted action on the subject of coercion. He called for a vote on the resolutions. Mr. Brent, of Alexandria, moved that the Convention adjourn; and on that motion Mr. Cox, of Chesterfield, called for
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
gentleman from Halifax, (Mr. Flournoy,) every word of whose speech he endorsed. His resolution proposed to call a conference of the border States, in order that Virginia might consult with them as to what ought to be done. If the gentleman from Harrison was a Union man he would go for such a conference. The Peace Conference, inaugurated by Virginia, had proved an abortion, and she can now do nothing by herself; but in concert with the Border States, much might be done. Tennessee and North Carolina had voted against Conventions of their people; Kentucky and Maryland had taken no action, and there was no indication of a movement in Missouri. It was due to them and to Virginia that there should be a conference. He condemned the hasty action of South Carolina and would condemn it in Virginia. But the people were in a state of feverish excitement, and wanted action on the subject of coercion. He called for a vote on the resolutions. Mr. Brent, of Alexandria, moved that the Con
New England (United States) (search for this): article 1
t is because of the "irrepressible conflict" between free and slave labor. The doctrine of the right of a State to secede originated in Massachusetts, the hot-bed of all the "isms," in 1807, because of the embargo. In 1808 the electors met in this city to east their votes for Madison as President, and one of the regular toasts at the electoral dinner was, "The Union of the States--the majority must govern--'tis treason to secede. " But the doctrine of secession was still agitated in the New England States, and the Richmond Enquirer held that it was treason to all intents and purposes. --Madison's letters were referred to as putting his heel upon the poisonous doctrine of secession. He alluded to the doctrines of the leading secessionists in this body. --The people of Virginia were a moral and a law-abiding people, and before they would endorse the doctrine they must be convinced of the morality and the legality of the act. Mr. Calhoun never held to such a right — he said in the Sen
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
al which we were now going through was a punishment for a violation of our plighted faith to the rude savage, but he believed also that we would be carried safely through. The efforts to forestal public opinion by telegraphic dispatches in Tennessee were repudiated by the result of the election there, as were similar efforts in Virginia, through the manifesto of a majority of her Congressional delegation. That document only convinced the people of what they thought before — that they wereentleman from Harrison was a Union man he would go for such a conference. The Peace Conference, inaugurated by Virginia, had proved an abortion, and she can now do nothing by herself; but in concert with the Border States, much might be done. Tennessee and North Carolina had voted against Conventions of their people; Kentucky and Maryland had taken no action, and there was no indication of a movement in Missouri. It was due to them and to Virginia that there should be a conference. He conde
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