hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Alfred Stewart 36 0 Browse Search
Peter D. Beauregard 23 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Homer 14 0 Browse Search
Lincoln 12 4 Browse Search
Robert E. Scott 12 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Agamemnon 8 0 Browse Search
Russia (Russia) 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 6 total hits in 3 results.

An important letter. --It will be recollected that in 1837, a distinguished merchant or banker, in London, was sent out here to act for the Bank of England, in which capacity he was "as one in authority, " in an apartment of the then United States Bank. This gentleman was John W. Cowell, and the letter we speak of and print elsewhere, from the London Examiner. Mr. Cowell advises separation of the Northern and Southern States, and teaches the South that separation is its interest, and that cotton-manufacturing, slave-hating England is the natural friend of cotton-producing, slave-holding South, His arguments, however, will go for what they are worth — admitted abolitionist as he is — but they teach us a lesson, especially us of the North, not to trifle more with this abstract issue of slavery, but to live with the South in peace.--N. Y. Expres
John W. Cowell (search for this): article 6
be recollected that in 1837, a distinguished merchant or banker, in London, was sent out here to act for the Bank of England, in which capacity he was "as one in authority, " in an apartment of the then United States Bank. This gentleman was John W. Cowell, and the letter we speak of and print elsewhere, from the London Examiner. Mr. Cowell advises separation of the Northern and Southern States, and teaches the South that separation is its interest, and that cotton-manufacturing, slave-hating er. Mr. Cowell advises separation of the Northern and Southern States, and teaches the South that separation is its interest, and that cotton-manufacturing, slave-hating England is the natural friend of cotton-producing, slave-holding South, His arguments, however, will go for what they are worth — admitted abolitionist as he is — but they teach us a lesson, especially us of the North, not to trifle more with this abstract issue of slavery, but to live with the South in peace.--N. Y. Expres
South River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 6
An important letter. --It will be recollected that in 1837, a distinguished merchant or banker, in London, was sent out here to act for the Bank of England, in which capacity he was "as one in authority, " in an apartment of the then United States Bank. This gentleman was John W. Cowell, and the letter we speak of and print elsewhere, from the London Examiner. Mr. Cowell advises separation of the Northern and Southern States, and teaches the South that separation is its interest, and that cotton-manufacturing, slave-hating England is the natural friend of cotton-producing, slave-holding South, His arguments, however, will go for what they are worth — admitted abolitionist as he is — but they teach us a lesson, especially us of the North, not to trifle more with this abstract issue of slavery, but to live with the South in peace.--N. Y. Expres