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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 11, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 1
onstruction of a Government with the slave States. [the reporter was unable to obtain a copy of the resolutions.] Mr. Marye addressed the Convention in opposition to coercion, and read resolutions expressive of his convictions. He wished the Convention to take a decided stand on this question, as an answer to the Inaugural, showing that when what had there been declared should be acted on, Virginia would also act. The following are the resolutions read by Mr. Marye. Whereas, Abraham Lincoln has announced, in his Inaugural Address, that he regards the Union is still unbroken, and that he feels constrained, by the obligations of his office, to assert the jurisdiction of the Federal Government within the seceded States: be it Resolved, by this Convention, that Virginia will resist any attempt by the Federal arm to coerce those States, and that she will regard the collection of revenue and the recapture of forts within the limits of such States, as coercive measures.
ia, by leave, corrected some portion of his speech, as reported in the official newspaper. Voice of the people. Mr. Marye, of Spotsylvania, by leave, laid before the Convention a series of resolutions adopted by the citizens of Fredericksburonstruction of a Government with the slave States. [the reporter was unable to obtain a copy of the resolutions.] Mr. Marye addressed the Convention in opposition to coercion, and read resolutions expressive of his convictions. He wished the hen what had there been declared should be acted on, Virginia would also act. The following are the resolutions read by Mr. Marye. Whereas, Abraham Lincoln has announced, in his Inaugural Address, that he regards the Union is still unbroken, aneport the same without delay to this body. on being informed that the Committee had already made a report in part, Mr. Marye did not ask for the reference of his resolutions, and no action was therefore taken upon them. minority reports.
adopt such measures as will afford to the people of the slaveholding-States full constitutional assurance of their safety in continuing any further association with them under a common Government. Resolved, That this Convention will, on the day after the adoption of these resolutions, appoint three Commissioners to proceed to Montgomery and confer with the authorities of the Confederate States in reference to the grave emergency in our public affairs. Personal Explanation. Mr. Johnson, of Richmond, asked the indulgence of the Convention while he made a brief personal explanation. He announced the fact [of which few in the Convention, probably, were aware] that reports had been circulated among his constituents charging him with having made a Black Republican and coercion speech in that body. He fully vindicated himself from the charges, and pronounced them slanderous and untrue. order of the day. The Convention proceeded to the consideration of the pending
ng resolutions of instruction to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Ambler, of Louisa, said the condition of his voice precluded the possibility of making a prolonged speech. He therefore merely desired to correct an impression which might have been made upon some minds, that his remarks on Friday were intended as a reflection upon the Western members. He disclaimed any such intention, and hoped they would yet rally to the support of their Eastern brethren in the maintenance of a common cause. Mr. Cox, of Chesterfield, the mover of the original resolution, said that since the Committee on Federal Relations had made a report, he considered it his duty to move to lay the resolution and amendments on the table. He therefore made that motion, which was carried in the affirmative; and the matters which had occupied the attention of the Convention for five days, were collectively consigned to the table. On motion of Mr. Patrick, of Kanawha, the Convention adjourned.
Henry A. Wise (search for this): article 1
he same without delay to this body. on being informed that the Committee had already made a report in part, Mr. Marye did not ask for the reference of his resolutions, and no action was therefore taken upon them. minority reports. Mr. Wise, of Princess Anne, as a member of the Committee on Federal Relations, asked leave to present a minority report. He was not authorized to speak for some of his colleagues who were absent, but embodied his individual dissent to the views of the mts of all the States and their people. All which is respectfully submitted, with the request to be permitted to assign hereafter the objections to the report, entertained by the minority of the Committee, several of whom are now absent. Henry A. Wise. Mr. Harvie, of Amelia, submitted the following minority report: The undersigned, a minority of the Committee on Federal Relations, report that, having had under consideration the resolutions referred to the said committee, and diss
om Goochland, to the resolution of instructions offered on Tuesday last by the gentleman from Chesterfield; and on that question Mr. Ambler, of Louisa, was entitled to the floor. Partial report from the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Conrad, of Frederick, from the Committee on Federal Relations, asked and obtained leave to make a partial report. The Committee, he said, had under consideration a large number of resolutions, and had directed him to submit the following to the Conveies of those States are requested to appoint Commissioners to meet Commissioners to be appointed by this Convention on behalf of the people of this State, at Frankfort, in the State of Kentucky, on the last Monday in may next. on motion of Mr. Conrad, the report was laid on the table and ordered to be printed. Correction. Mr. Brent, of Alexandria, by leave, corrected some portion of his speech, as reported in the official newspaper. Voice of the people. Mr. Marye, of Spotsyl
Virginia State Convention.twenty-first day. Saturday, March 9, 1861. The Convention met at 12, and was called to order by Mr. Goggin, in the absence of the President. Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Hoge, of the Presbyterian Church. The Chairman stated the pending question to be on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Amelia to the amendment offered by the gentleman from Goochland, to the resolution of instructions offered on Tuesday last by the gentleman from Chesterfield; and on that question Mr. Ambler, of Louisa, was entitled to the floor. Partial report from the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Conrad, of Frederick, from the Committee on Federal Relations, asked and obtained leave to make a partial report. The Committee, he said, had under consideration a large number of resolutions, and had directed him to submit the following to the Convention. The suggested amendments to the Constitution therein referred to, would be reported upon at an early day:
Virginia State Convention.twenty-first day. Saturday, March 9, 1861. The Convention met at 12, and was called to order by Mr. Goggin, in the absence of the President. Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Hoge, of the Presbyterian Church. The Chairman stated the pending question to be on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Amelia to the amendment offered by the gentleman from Goochland, to the resolution of instructions offered on Tuesday last by the gentleman from Chesterfield; and on that question Mr. Ambler, of Louisa, was entitled to the floor. Partial report from the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Conrad, of Frederick, from the Committee on Federal Relations, asked and obtained leave to make a partial report. The Committee, he said, had under consideration a large number of resolutions, and had directed him to submit the following to the Convention. The suggested amendments to the Constitution therein referred to, would be reported upon at an early day:
Lewis E. Harvie (search for this): article 1
tes and their people. All which is respectfully submitted, with the request to be permitted to assign hereafter the objections to the report, entertained by the minority of the Committee, several of whom are now absent. Henry A. Wise. Mr. Harvie, of Amelia, submitted the following minority report: The undersigned, a minority of the Committee on Federal Relations, report that, having had under consideration the resolutions referred to the said committee, and dissenting from the ret an ordinance resuming the powers delegated by Virginia to the Federal Government, and to make provision for submitting the same to the qualified voters of the Commonwealth for their adoption or rejection. Respectfully submitted, Lewis E. Harvie, Robert L. Montague, Samuel C. Williams. Mr. Barbour, of Culpeper, from the same committee, submitted the following minority report on his own behalf: Resolved, That this Convention has witnessed with deep concern the failure
ng question to be on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Amelia to the amendment offered by the gentleman from Goochland, to the resolution of instructions offered on Tuesday last by the gentleman from Chesterfield; and on that question Mr. Ambler, of Louisa, was entitled to the floor. Partial report from the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Conrad, of Frederick, from the Committee on Federal Relations, asked and obtained leave to make a partial report. The Committee, he saully vindicated himself from the charges, and pronounced them slanderous and untrue. order of the day. The Convention proceeded to the consideration of the pending resolutions of instruction to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Ambler, of Louisa, said the condition of his voice precluded the possibility of making a prolonged speech. He therefore merely desired to correct an impression which might have been made upon some minds, that his remarks on Friday were intended as a
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