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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 21, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 10 total hits in 4 results.

Valparaiso (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 13
Death of a heroic lady. --Mrs. Mary Ann Patten, widow of the late Captain Joshua Patten, died in Boston on Sunday, of consumption. Mrs. Patten, it will be remembered by many, says the Courier, was the heroic wife, who, some three or four years ago, nursed her sick husband when prostrated by illness and incurable blindness, and took charge of his ship — the Neptune's Car — and in spite of the officer's desire to put into Valparaiso, navigated the vessel to San Francisco and thus saved much detention as well as expense to the underwriters. Mrs. Patten had nearly completed her twenty-fourth yea
San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): article 13
Death of a heroic lady. --Mrs. Mary Ann Patten, widow of the late Captain Joshua Patten, died in Boston on Sunday, of consumption. Mrs. Patten, it will be remembered by many, says the Courier, was the heroic wife, who, some three or four years ago, nursed her sick husband when prostrated by illness and incurable blindness, and took charge of his ship — the Neptune's Car — and in spite of the officer's desire to put into Valparaiso, navigated the vessel to San Francisco and thus saved much detention as well as expense to the underwriters. Mrs. Patten had nearly completed her twenty-fourth yea
Joshua Patten (search for this): article 13
Death of a heroic lady. --Mrs. Mary Ann Patten, widow of the late Captain Joshua Patten, died in Boston on Sunday, of consumption. Mrs. Patten, it will be remembered by many, says the Courier, was the heroic wife, who, some three or four years ago, nursed her sick husband when prostrated by illness and incurable blindness, aMrs. Patten, it will be remembered by many, says the Courier, was the heroic wife, who, some three or four years ago, nursed her sick husband when prostrated by illness and incurable blindness, and took charge of his ship — the Neptune's Car — and in spite of the officer's desire to put into Valparaiso, navigated the vessel to San Francisco and thus saved much detention as well as expense to the underwriters. Mrs. Patten had nearly completed her twenty-fourth year. nd when prostrated by illness and incurable blindness, and took charge of his ship — the Neptune's Car — and in spite of the officer's desire to put into Valparaiso, navigated the vessel to San Francisco and thus saved much detention as well as expense to the underwriters. Mrs. Patten had nearly completed her twenty-fourth
Mary Ann Patten (search for this): article 13
Death of a heroic lady. --Mrs. Mary Ann Patten, widow of the late Captain Joshua Patten, died in Boston on Sunday, of consumption. Mrs. Patten, it will be remembered by many, says the Courier, was the heroic wife, who, some three or four years ago, nursed her sick husband when prostrated by illness and incurable blindness, and took charge of his ship — the Neptune's Car — and in spite of the officer's desire to put into Valparaiso, navigated the vessel to San Francisco and thus saved much detention as well as expense to the underwriters. Mrs. Patten had nearly completed her twenty-fourth yea