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unction of the Chair. Whatever applause there was, proceeded from the floor. [A voice in the lobby--"Good."] He thought the spectators ought not to be made to suffer for a disturbance made on the floor, in which they did not participate. Mr. Morton, of Orange, said there was nothing so desirable in the discussion of this great question, as the preservation of order; but it was impossible to repress an outburst of sympathy under such eloquent appeals.--After some further remarks, in which he alluded to the "heartless order" for clearing the galleries. -- Mr. Early, of Franklin, rose to a point of order. The gentleman had spoken of a heartless order. The Chairman said he was aware of that, and proposed to reply. Mr. Morton disclaimed any intention to reflect upon the action of the Chair. Mr. Baldwin, of Augusta, said it was his fortune to follow the eloquent gentleman from Albemarle, and he thought this fact furnished a guarantee that there would be no more de
Peter Brown (search for this): article 1
t was like a firebrand thrown in here, to inflame excitement, and distract the counsels of the Convention. Mr. Slaughter then appealed to his friends from the West to come forward and withdraw this agitating subject from the Convention.--Their object could be better attained at an adjourned session. He hoped the call for the yeas and nays would be withdrawn, and that the subject would be passed by for the present. Mr. Goode said the motion to lay on the table was withdrawn. Mr. Brown, of Preston, proposed to offer the following, with the consent of the Convention, as a compromise of the matter: Resolved. That the President appoint a committee of fifteen members, whose duty it shall be to inquire if it be expedient to change or amend the organic law of the State, and if so, in what particular or particulars, and report thereon to an adjourned meeting of this body, should the Convention adjourn to meet at some future day. The President said there was no quest
of that, and proposed to reply. Mr. Morton disclaimed any intention to reflect upon the action of the Chair. Mr. Baldwin, of Augusta, said it was his fortune to follow the eloquent gentleman from Albemarle, and he thought this fact furnish order, he took pleasure in doing so; but cautioned the spectators to refrain from such demonstrations hereafter. Mr. Baldwin then took the floor. After a brief allusion to the sentiments uttered so eloquently by the gentleman from Albemarle, and contempt. Mr. Holcombe here asked the gentleman if he said this as an allusion to anything he had said. Mr. Baldwin had understood him to make use of such language. Mr. Holcombe denied that he had spoken of Virginia as degraded aresent. It was in allusion to the future, in the event of her failure to dissolve her connection with the North. Mr. Baldwin did not so understand him, but cheerfully accepted his construction. He desired to reflect upon no one, and especiall
Equality of Taxation. The President said the pending question, at the adjournment yesterday, was on the motion of Mr. Goode, of Mecklenburg, to lay on the table the resolutions offered on Monday last, by Mr. Willey, of Monongalia. Mr. Slaughter, of Lynchburg, appealed to Mr. Goode to withdraw his motion, in order that he might make an appeal to the Western members to postpone the discussion of the question until the Convention meets in the fall. Mr. Goode consented to withdraw Mr. Goode consented to withdraw the motion. He had no desire to cut off debate, but considered the present a most inopportune time for the discussion of the question. It was like a firebrand thrown in here, to inflame excitement, and distract the counsels of the Convention. hoped the call for the yeas and nays would be withdrawn, and that the subject would be passed by for the present. Mr. Goode said the motion to lay on the table was withdrawn. Mr. Brown, of Preston, proposed to offer the following, with th
Slaughter (search for this): article 1
Equality of Taxation. The President said the pending question, at the adjournment yesterday, was on the motion of Mr. Goode, of Mecklenburg, to lay on the table the resolutions offered on Monday last, by Mr. Willey, of Monongalia. Mr. Slaughter, of Lynchburg, appealed to Mr. Goode to withdraw his motion, in order that he might make an appeal to the Western members to postpone the discussion of the question until the Convention meets in the fall. Mr. Goode consented to withdraw ion. He had no desire to cut off debate, but considered the present a most inopportune time for the discussion of the question. It was like a firebrand thrown in here, to inflame excitement, and distract the counsels of the Convention. Mr. Slaughter then appealed to his friends from the West to come forward and withdraw this agitating subject from the Convention.--Their object could be better attained at an adjourned session. He hoped the call for the yeas and nays would be withdrawn, a
Committee on Federal Relations. Equality of Taxation. The President said the pending question, at the adjournment yesterday, was on the motion of Mr. Goode, of Mecklenburg, to lay on the table the resolutions offered on Monday last, by Mr. Willey, of Monongalia. Mr. Slaughter, of Lynchburg, appealed to Mr. Goode to withdraw his motion, in order that he might make an appeal to the Western members to postpone the discussion of the question until the Convention meets in the fall. nd report thereon to an adjourned meeting of this body, should the Convention adjourn to meet at some future day. The President said there was no question before the Convention except the resolutions of the gentleman from Monongalia. Mr. Willey said he had offered the resolutions, not as a measure of strife, but to promote peace. All he wanted was a proper assurance that the matter would be adjusted in a reasonable time. He desired to express his views more fully on the subject, but
s to join hands with one another and swear, as the ark of the covenant of constitutional liberty had been confided to their keeping, to be true to their trust; to register a vow in Heaven to lift up this bleeding country and set her free. Mr. Randolph, of Richmond.--As it is apparent that the gentleman from Augusta would prefer to suspend his remarks until tomorrow, I move that the Committee rise. Mr. Carlile, of Harrison.--I hope the gentleman will withdraw that motion for a few moments, and I will renew it. The gentleman from Augusta will of course retain the floor. I desire to offer a substitute for the whole report of the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Randolph withdrew the motion, and Mr. Carlile offered the following substitute, which was referred to the Committee of the Whole: Whereas, the Peace Conference, which was called by the Legislature of this State, and in which 21 States (14 of them non-slaveholding) of this Union were represented, after much
outhall, of Albemarle, in the Chair,) and proceeded to consider the report of the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Holcombe, of Albemarle, being entitled to the floor, resumed his remarks. He alluded to the momentous question which the Conve country were the spirit and the principles which animated our fathers to resist tyranny and repel aggression. As Mr. Holcombe uttered the closing sentence (the eloquent language of which we but faintly portray,) there was a spontaneous outburstor in regard to the degradation of Virginia, and said he burled such an imputation back with scorn and contempt. Mr. Holcombe here asked the gentleman if he said this as an allusion to anything he had said. Mr. Baldwin had understood him to make use of such language. Mr. Holcombe denied that he had spoken of Virginia as degraded at present. It was in allusion to the future, in the event of her failure to dissolve her connection with the North. Mr. Baldwin did not so underst
the lobby--"Good."] He thought the spectators ought not to be made to suffer for a disturbance made on the floor, in which they did not participate. Mr. Morton, of Orange, said there was nothing so desirable in the discussion of this great question, as the preservation of order; but it was impossible to repress an outburst of sympathy under such eloquent appeals.--After some further remarks, in which he alluded to the "heartless order" for clearing the galleries. -- Mr. Early, of Franklin, rose to a point of order. The gentleman had spoken of a heartless order. The Chairman said he was aware of that, and proposed to reply. Mr. Morton disclaimed any intention to reflect upon the action of the Chair. Mr. Baldwin, of Augusta, said it was his fortune to follow the eloquent gentleman from Albemarle, and he thought this fact furnished a guarantee that there would be no more demonstrations of applause. [Laughter.] The Chairman said his duty required him to enf
the people of Virginia in Convention assembled-- 1. That it be, and is hereby recommended, to the people of the several States composing the United States to hold, in their respective States. Conventions to consider the said measures of adjustment, and express their approval of the same; and request their Senators and Representatives in Congress, assembled either in extra or regular session, at its first meeting, to adopt the same by the constitutional majority of two-thirds of each House, so that the same may be laid before the several States of this Union in the mode pointed out by the said fifth article of the Constitution aforesaid, for ratification or rejection. 2. That this Convention, for and in the name of the good people of this Commonwealth, do declare their approval of the said propositions, and will if adopted as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, accept the same as an adjustment of all our national difficulties; and that we do hereby reque
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