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Leodium (Belgium) (search for this): article 11
Glass cask. --A patent has been taken out by A. Hubert and U. Cantillion, of Liege, in Belgium, for making small casks and barrels of glass. The idea is to apply glass in the formation of casks of five gallons capacity and downward. They blow the glass in a mould of wood or iron, the mould being in two parts of the form of the cask. A certain portion of the molten glass is introduced into the mould on the end of the glass-blower's staff; then the mould is closed, and the glass is blown until it assumes the form of the mould, and is hollow inside. The tap hole is pierced in the cask with a red-hot iron. Small flasks of a barrel-shape, made of glass, are common, but flasks of five-gallon size appear to be an extension of glass application to this particular purpose, and for holding ether, oils, &c. In situations where they are not required to be moved about, they will answer a most excellent purpose.
Glass cask. --A patent has been taken out by A. Hubert and U. Cantillion, of Liege, in Belgium, for making small casks and barrels of glass. The idea is to apply glass in the formation of casks of five gallons capacity and downward. They blow the glass in a mould of wood or iron, the mould being in two parts of the form of the cask. A certain portion of the molten glass is introduced into the mould on the end of the glass-blower's staff; then the mould is closed, and the glass is blown until it assumes the form of the mould, and is hollow inside. The tap hole is pierced in the cask with a red-hot iron. Small flasks of a barrel-shape, made of glass, are common, but flasks of five-gallon size appear to be an extension of glass application to this particular purpose, and for holding ether, oils, &c. In situations where they are not required to be moved about, they will answer a most excellent purpose.
U. Cantillion (search for this): article 11
Glass cask. --A patent has been taken out by A. Hubert and U. Cantillion, of Liege, in Belgium, for making small casks and barrels of glass. The idea is to apply glass in the formation of casks of five gallons capacity and downward. They blow the glass in a mould of wood or iron, the mould being in two parts of the form of the cask. A certain portion of the molten glass is introduced into the mould on the end of the glass-blower's staff; then the mould is closed, and the glass is blown until it assumes the form of the mould, and is hollow inside. The tap hole is pierced in the cask with a red-hot iron. Small flasks of a barrel-shape, made of glass, are common, but flasks of five-gallon size appear to be an extension of glass application to this particular purpose, and for holding ether, oils, &c. In situations where they are not required to be moved about, they will answer a most excellent purpose.