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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 23, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Binghampton (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 17
Trial for Murder. --Sarah Herrington, who was married in 1859, at the age of fifteen years, was tried at Binghampton, N. Y., last week, for poisoning her husband, James Herrington, aged thirty-six. On the trial it was proven that the prisoner had purchased arsenic, but also that the deceased had been an arsenic eater for years before his death. The Delaware Republican says the Judge's charge to the jury was clear and impartial, and that the verdict of the jury was not guilty. Mrs. Herrington refused to dress in mourning during her trial, and the expression of her face did not change from the time the jury was empaneled until they rendered their verdict, except that she shed a few tears when her counsel was opening her defence to the jury — again, during the Judge's charge, and when the verdict of not guilty was pronounced. Public opinion or sympathy for her was so strong that the immense crowd of spectators present, when the verdict was rendered, applauded and cheered in the
James Herrington (search for this): article 17
Trial for Murder. --Sarah Herrington, who was married in 1859, at the age of fifteen years, was tried at Binghampton, N. Y., last week, for poisoning her husband, James Herrington, aged thirty-six. On the trial it was proven that the prisoner had purchased arsenic, but also that the deceased had been an arsenic eater for years before his death. The Delaware Republican says the Judge's charge to the jury was clear and impartial, and that the verdict of the jury was not guilty. Mrs. HerrinMrs. Herrington refused to dress in mourning during her trial, and the expression of her face did not change from the time the jury was empaneled until they rendered their verdict, except that she shed a few tears when her counsel was opening her defence to the jury — again, during the Judge's charge, and when the verdict of not guilty was pronounced. Public opinion or sympathy for her was so strong that the immense crowd of spectators present, when the verdict was rendered, applauded and cheered in the
Sarah Herrington (search for this): article 17
Trial for Murder. --Sarah Herrington, who was married in 1859, at the age of fifteen years, was tried at Binghampton, N. Y., last week, for poisoning her husband, James Herrington, aged thirty-six. On the trial it was proven that the prisoner had purchased arsenic, but also that the deceased had been an arsenic eater for years before his death. The Delaware Republican says the Judge's charge to the jury was clear and impartial, and that the verdict of the jury was not guilty. Mrs. Herrington refused to dress in mourning during her trial, and the expression of her face did not change from the time the jury was empaneled until they rendered their verdict, except that she shed a few tears when her counsel was opening her defence to the jury — again, during the Judge's charge, and when the verdict of not guilty was pronounced. Public opinion or sympathy for her was so strong that the immense crowd of spectators present, when the verdict was rendered, applauded and cheered in the w
Trial for Murder. --Sarah Herrington, who was married in 1859, at the age of fifteen years, was tried at Binghampton, N. Y., last week, for poisoning her husband, James Herrington, aged thirty-six. On the trial it was proven that the prisoner had purchased arsenic, but also that the deceased had been an arsenic eater for years before his death. The Delaware Republican says the Judge's charge to the jury was clear and impartial, and that the verdict of the jury was not guilty. Mrs. Herrington refused to dress in mourning during her trial, and the expression of her face did not change from the time the jury was empaneled until they rendered their verdict, except that she shed a few tears when her counsel was opening her defence to the jury — again, during the Judge's charge, and when the verdict of not guilty was pronounced. Public opinion or sympathy for her was so strong that the immense crowd of spectators present, when the verdict was rendered, applauded and cheered in the w