hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 30 0 Browse Search
Wise 16 14 Browse Search
N. Wilson 14 2 Browse Search
Julius Caesar 14 0 Browse Search
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) 13 1 Browse Search
Carlile 12 10 Browse Search
George W. Summers 11 1 Browse Search
Amelia Court House (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Hanover County (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
John S. Martin 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 26, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 12 total hits in 3 results.

Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 3
of the Storm King. The storm ceased for a few hours Friday morning, but having gathered new strength as noon approached, it was renewed with fresh vigor until one, when it ceased. The railroads, both steam and horse, were laid under a complete embargo. The snow fell heavy and deep upon the tracks of city railways, forcing a substitution of omnibuses on runners for cars on all the roads except the Cambridge, and even preventing this mode of conveyance between the termini of the branch lines and the city. Up to half-past 10 in the forenoon nothing had reached town over the Cambridge road from Watertown, Brighton, or West Cambridge. The people of Somerville, Medford, and Malden, were equally unfortunate; while on the south side of the city, business men were detained until a late hour. The shore train from New York over the Providence road was only an hour late Thursday night. It rained between New Haven and Providence most of the afternoon, and thus kept the track open.
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 3
nes and the city. Up to half-past 10 in the forenoon nothing had reached town over the Cambridge road from Watertown, Brighton, or West Cambridge. The people of Somerville, Medford, and Malden, were equally unfortunate; while on the south side of the city, business men were detained until a late hour. The shore train from New York over the Providence road was only an hour late Thursday night. It rained between New Haven and Providence most of the afternoon, and thus kept the track open. nes and the city. Up to half-past 10 in the forenoon nothing had reached town over the Cambridge road from Watertown, Brighton, or West Cambridge. The people of Somerville, Medford, and Malden, were equally unfortunate; while on the south side of the city, business men were detained until a late hour. The shore train from New York over the Providence road was only an hour late Thursday night. It rained between New Haven and Providence most of the afternoon, and thus kept the track open.
New England (United States) (search for this): article 3
Great snow Storm at Boston --Embargo on Railroad Travel.--Boston has been visited by a real old-fashioned snow storm, recalling, in the length of its duration and in its effects, the traditional snow storms which in New England, years ago, used to bury whole villages. Commencing on Thursday forenoon, it continued with unabated violence for nearly two days. The Journal says of it: Such a tempest has not occurred hereabouts for years. The snow, damp and heavy, feels great flakes, and was dashed with blinding fury into the faces of all who chanced to be abroad. Buildings exposed to the force of the gale rocked and creaked from base to roof; loose blinds and shutters annoyed their owners by their continual slamming, or were blown from their hinges and scattered about the streets. A great deal of damage was done to trees, both in the city and the suburbs; large limbs were broken off and strewn about, fences were blown down, and swing signs carried away by the wind. Th