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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 27, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Zabalkoff (search for this): article 5
and then charged them just as the members of the Agricultural Society were crossing the street on their way from their sitting at the palace. Six of them fell dead from the fire of the Russian soldiers. As they were well known and highly respected, a tumult broke out upon the spot. --The Agricultural Society immediately sent a deputation to Prince Gortchakoff, the Governor, who, not feeling himself strong enough to repress the people, ordered the troops to their barracks, and brought General Zabalkoff, the officer who gave the order to fire, to a court-martial. The Agricultural Society, which was a grand national association, broke up its meeting, and all the Marshals resigned on the spot. At the last accounts, order had been restored, and the citizens and police took it by turns to parade the streets at night; but the spirit of nationality is once more roused in Poland. It appears that a petition, signed by tens of thousands of Poles, was sent to the Emperor Alexander, prayi
Huate De Yturbide (search for this): article 17
y in which she moved. A pension from the Mexican Government enabled her to educate her family liberally, and she has performed her duties as a mother and a member of society in a faithful and exemplary manner. One or two of the sons of Madame Yturbide have, we believe, resided in Mexico of late years, and have held offices under the Government. Her daughters were unable to be present at the funeral, which took place on Saturday morning, at St. Joseph's Church.--The service was of the sim and scarcely one in ten thousand of the vast population of the city where she had long resided, knew that the grave had that day closed over one who once held rank as an Empress. The sad affliction that has thus befallen the family of Madame de Yturbide recalls to the memory the heroic career of her noble husband. He was the great man of the best days of Mexico. He was the author of her separation from Spain, and the Mexican people, in the first flush of their gratitude, fairly thrust up
Huate Yturbide (search for this): article 17
Death of an Ex-Empress. An Ex-Empress died in Philadelphia last week. We refer to Madame Huate de Yturbide, widow of the former Emperor of Mexico, whose decease took place on Thursday last, at her lodgings in Broad street. This estimable lady, who had resided in Philadelphia since the execution of her husband by the Mexican Government, in 1824, belonged to a distinguished Spanish family long resident in Mexico. Her misfortunes, as well as her good qualities as a woman, had secured her the regard of the society in which she moved. A pension from the Mexican Government enabled her to educate her family liberally, and she has performed her duties as a mother and a member of society in a faithful and exemplary manner. One or two of the sons of Madame Yturbide have, we believe, resided in Mexico of late years, and have held offices under the Government. Her daughters were unable to be present at the funeral, which took place on Saturday morning, at St. Joseph's Church.--The s
661,753140,4391 Georgia595,097462,2301,057,32771 Illinois1,711,7531,711,753134 Indiana1,350,4791,350,47911 Iowa674,948674,94853 Kansas107,110107,1101 Kentucky930,223225,4901,155,71382 Louisiana376,913332,520700,43351 Maine628,276628,27651 Maryland599,84687,188687,03451 Massachusetts1,231,0651,231,065101 Mississippi354,699436,696791,3955 Missouri1,058,352114,9651,173,31792 Michigan749,112749,11262 Minnesota162,022162,02211 N. Hampshire326,072326,0723 N. Jersey672,031672,0315 N. York3,887,5423,887,542312 N. Carolina661,586331,081992,66771 Ohio2,339,5992,339,599183 Oregon52,46452,4641 Pennsylvania2,906,3702,996,370232 R. Island174,621174,62111 S. Carolina301,271402,541703,81242 Tennessee834,063275,7841,109,84782 Texas420,651180,388601,03942 Virginia1,105,190490,8871,596,083112 Vermont315,116315,11621 Wisconsin775,879775,87363 Total27,185,1093949,55731,134,6662332419 Territories. Colorado34,19734,197 Dakotas4,8294,839 Nebraska28,8321028,842 Nevada6,8576,8
Daniel Wrenn (search for this): article 1
John Ryan, Daniel Wrenn, and John Butter, were carried before the Mayor yesterday to answer the consequences resulting from a general "bender," indulged in by them Saturday night and Sunday. Witnesses in the case ascribed to them the commission of a considerable amount of lawlessness, embraced under the common heading of drunkenness, fighting, and disorderly conduct. Daniel Wrenn drew a pistol on Robt. S. Thompson, bar-keeper for Edwin W. Ussher, keeper of the Grapes Saloon; and Ryan, aDaniel Wrenn drew a pistol on Robt. S. Thompson, bar-keeper for Edwin W. Ussher, keeper of the Grapes Saloon; and Ryan, and the others, pounded the unfortunate mixer of liquors "without sufficient cause," and in a manner which was decidedly detrimental to his good looks, on his attempting to get off. After "clearing out" the Grapes Saloon, and putting its proprietor in great bodily fear, the parties proceeded to Thomas M. Granger's, on 23d street, and enacted similar doings, to the disgust of the proprietor, and the using-up of his water-gutter and door. Inasmuch as Morris Wilcher, John Chappell, and Jos. Fordsel
John R. Wormley (search for this): article 6
Otway Smith being possessed with the idea that one John R. Wormley would carry into practical execution certain threats uttered by the latter against his personal well-being, (which threats, if worked out to their legitimate conclusion, would tend to the extinguishment of his valuable life,) yesterday procured the arrest of Wormley, who was carried before the Mayor to answer for putting Smith's breathing apparatus in peril. --Disavowing the sanguinary motives imputed to him, the defendantter against his personal well-being, (which threats, if worked out to their legitimate conclusion, would tend to the extinguishment of his valuable life,) yesterday procured the arrest of Wormley, who was carried before the Mayor to answer for putting Smith's breathing apparatus in peril. --Disavowing the sanguinary motives imputed to him, the defendant, a Chesterfieldian by birth, was permitted to rejoin his "yaller jacket" companions, on promising to forego future visits to the metropolis.
dditional protection for the slave property of the citizens of this Commonwealth, was taken up on motion of Mr.Jones, of Gloucester, and passed. Bill to incorporate the Home Savings Bank of the city of Richmond, was, on motion of Mr. Robertson, taken up, and being explained, was passed. Mr. Christian called up engrossed bill incorporating the Staunton Savings Bank, which was passed.--The engrossed bill for the relief of John Robinson, a free negro of Rockingham county, was, on motion of Mr. Woolfolk, indefinitely postponed. Senate bill incorporating the American Agency, with its amendments, was called up on motion of Mr. Segar, and being put on its passage, was carried — ayes 57, noes 35. The bill incorporating the Patrick Springs Female College was called up, on motion of Mr. Staples, and passed. The joint resolution, heretofore offered, approving the contract made by the Armory Commissioners, for the sale of muskets to J. R. Anderson & Co., was called up by Mr. Kemper, and b
n here, when no good could be accomplished. He moved that by general consent the gentleman from Wetzel have leave to withdraw his substitute. Mr. Jackson, of Wood, objected. Mr. Clark, of Nelson, moved to reconsider the vote by which the Committee refused leave to withdraw. The Chairman said no vote could be recons The roll being again called, the vote resulted — yeas 12, nays 56--no quorum voting. The fact was reported, (Mr. Sheffey in the Chair,) and Mr. Jackson, of Wood, moved a call of the House. Mr. Macfarland moved an adjournment, and it was decided that this motion took precedence over every other question. Mr. Jacksaring, and the yeas and nays were demanded upon the resolution, as amended by himself. The vote resulted — yeas 71, nays 5--no quorum voting. Mr. Jackson, of Wood, called attention to the fact that there were several gentlemen present who had not voted. Another squabble ensued as to whether members should be allowed to
O. Jennings Wise (search for this): article 1
Albemarle — could show anything tangible, he would be ready to accept it. Mr. Wise protested against being mingled with these dualities. He would say to the genplatform.--He was too slow in the enforcement of his guarantees of power. Mr. Wise said he was obliged to be slow, for he had very heavy weights to drag after higment seat of God, in vindication of the rights of Virginia. [Applause.] Mr. Wise, of Princess Anne, next addressed the Convention. After an allusion to the elthe Constitution. Mr. Preston reiterated the argument which he had made. Mr. Wise proposed to show that there were other guarantees of power, which the committe the gentleman, but if he had such guarantees he would like to have them. Mr. Wise had none to propose. Mr. Preston said he thought he had them in his breeced to quiet agitation by removing it entirely from the halls of Congress. Mr. Wise said that the whole effort was then to be given up; that, acknowledging they c
O. Jennings Wise (search for this): article 2
r. Clemens moved that the reading be dispensed with. Mr. Wise insisted upon hearing it read. He was opposed to the intwould go forth that it was for the purpose of delay. Mr. Wise said he had no authority for such an assertion, and it waall for the reading of a paper, would be recognized. Mr. Wise wished it to be understood, that in denying the imputatiMr. Hall, of Wetzel, arose to address the committee. Mr. Wise appealed to Mr. Hall to withdraw his substitute. Mr. After some time, Mr. Hall yielded the floor to Mr. Wise, who appealed to the members to discontinue the present mote could be reconsidered in Committee of the Whole. Mr. Wise moved that the Committee rise, and on that motion Mr. Coxnays 63. So the motion was decided in the negative. Mr. Wise said that he had found a friend who was kind enough to pa say that he was sick — sick in every sense of the word. Mr. Wise then withdrew. Mr. Hall regretted very much the cour
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