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hereafter; but he would say to the war-horse of Prince George, and his friends, that if they succeeded in carrying their doctrine of consolidation, the people would repudiate it. Mr. Carlile, of Harrison, took the floor, and called the attention of the gentleman from Middlesex to the language of the Declaration of Independence; he thought if the doctrines advocated by the gentleman were true, the authors of that instrument did not understand their own work. He quoted from the debates of 1788, from the opinions of Madison, the speeches of Calhoun, to show that the ground occupied in this Convention was untenable. Mr. Dorman, of Rockbridge, gave reasons why he should vote against the amendment, and wanted it to be known that his course was not in opposition to any well understood doctrine of State-rights, or in favor of any idea of consolidation. Mr. Baylor, of Augusta, said he was a State-Rights man; but if the State of Virginia could not make a law in conflict with the
, or by Conventions called by the Legislatures of said States, on or before the first Monday in October next. Resolved. That in case said amendments shall not be approved by the Legislatures or Conventions of said States, on or before the first Monday in October next, that then an ordinance to the effect indicated in the following resolution, shall go into operation on the third Monday in OOctober next. Resolved, That this Convention will adopt an ordinance resuming to the State of Virginia the powers heretofore delegated by her to the Federal Government, to take effect on the third Monday in October next, in case the amendments indicated in the foregoing suggestions are not approved by the several states of the Union on or before the first Monday in October next. ResolveOctober next. Resolved, That the said amendments and ordinance be submitted to the people of this State, at the next general election, for their approval or rejection. The motion being to strike out the report of th
o the war-horse of Prince George, and his friends, that if they succeeded in carrying their doctrine of consolidation, the people would repudiate it. Mr. Carlile, of Harrison, took the floor, and called the attention of the gentleman from Middlesex to the language of the Declaration of Independence; he thought if the doctrines advocated by the gentleman were true, the authors of that instrument did not understand their own work. He quoted from the debates of 1788, from the opinions of Madison, the speeches of Calhoun, to show that the ground occupied in this Convention was untenable. Mr. Dorman, of Rockbridge, gave reasons why he should vote against the amendment, and wanted it to be known that his course was not in opposition to any well understood doctrine of State-rights, or in favor of any idea of consolidation. Mr. Baylor, of Augusta, said he was a State-Rights man; but if the State of Virginia could not make a law in conflict with the Constitution of the United S
John Goode (search for this): article 1
yeas and nays were demanded by Mr. Conrad, of Frederick. The roll was then called, and the vote resulted as follows: Yeas.--Messrs. Ambler, Blakey, Boisseau, Borst, Chambliss, Coffman, Conn, Richard H. Cox, Fisher, Graham, Gregory, John Goode, Jr., Tho F Goode, Harvie, Holcombe, Hunton, Isbell, Kledred, Lawson, Leake, Chas. K. Mallory, Jas. B. Mallory, Montague, Morris, Morton, Neblett, Randolph, Richardson, Seawell, Strange, Thornton, Robt. H. Turner, Franklin P. Turner, Tyler, WilliGoode, Harvie, Holcombe, Hunton, Isbell, Kledred, Lawson, Leake, Chas. K. Mallory, Jas. B. Mallory, Montague, Morris, Morton, Neblett, Randolph, Richardson, Seawell, Strange, Thornton, Robt. H. Turner, Franklin P. Turner, Tyler, Williams, Wise, and Woods.--37. Nays.--Messrs Janney, (President,) Armstrong, Asion, Baldwin, Baylor, Berlin, Blow, Boggess, Boyd, Brent, Brown, Burdett, Burley, Byrne, Cabell, Campbell, Carlile, Chapman, Clemens, C. R. Conrad, Robt. Y. Conrad, Couch, James H. Cox, Custis, Deskins, Dorman, Dulany, Early, Echols, Forbes, Fugate, Garland, Gillespie, Gravely, Gray, Goggin, Addison Hall, Cyrus Hall, Ephraim B. Hall, Hammond, Haymond, Hoge, Holladay, Hubbard, Hughes, Huil, Jackson, Marmaduke Johnson
Baldwin, Baylor, Berlin, Blow, Boggess, Boyd, Brent, Brown, Burdett, Burley, Byrne, Cabell, Campbell, Carlile, Chapman, Clemens, C. R. Conrad, Robt. Y. Conrad, Couch, James H. Cox, Custis, Deskins, Dorman, Dulany, Early, Echols, Forbes, Fugate, Garland, Gillespie, Gravely, Gray, Goggin, Addison Hall, Cyrus Hall, Ephraim B. Hall, Hammond, Haymond, Hoge, Holladay, Hubbard, Hughes, Huil, Jackson, Marmaduke Johnson, Peter C. Johnston, Kilby, Lewis, McComas, McGrew, McNeil, Macfarland, Marshall, Marye, Maslin, Masters, Miller, Moffet, Nelson, Osburn, Parks, Petrick, Pendleton, Porter, Preston, Price, Pugh, Rives, Robt. E. Scott, Sharp, Sheffey, Sitlingtone Slaughter, Southall, Speed, Spurlock, Staples, Chapman J. Stuart, Sammers, Sutherlin, Tarr, Taylor, Waller, Whitfield, Willey, and Wilson.--89. So the motion to strike out and insert was decided in the negative. Mr. Harvie, of Amelia, said various inquiries had been made of him as to when he should offer his minority report as
, Richard H. Cox, Fisher, Graham, Gregory, John Goode, Jr., Tho F Goode, Harvie, Holcombe, Hunton, Isbell, Kledred, Lawson, Leake, Chas. K. Mallory, Jas. B. Mallory, Montague, Morris, Morton, Neblett, Randolph, Richardson, Seawell, Strange, Thornton, Robt. H. Turner, Franklin P. Turner, Tyler, Williams, Wise, and Woods.--37. Nays.--Messrs Janney, (President,) Armstrong, Asion, Baldwin, Baylor, Berlin, Blow, Boggess, Boyd, Brent, Brown, Burdett, Burley, Byrne, Cabell, Campbell, Carlile, Chapman, Clemens, C. R. Conrad, Robt. Y. Conrad, Couch, James H. Cox, Custis, Deskins, Dorman, Dulany, Early, Echols, Forbes, Fugate, Garland, Gillespie, Gravely, Gray, Goggin, Addison Hall, Cyrus Hall, Ephraim B. Hall, Hammond, Haymond, Hoge, Holladay, Hubbard, Hughes, Huil, Jackson, Marmaduke Johnson, Peter C. Johnston, Kilby, Lewis, McComas, McGrew, McNeil, Macfarland, Marshall, Marye, Maslin, Masters, Miller, Moffet, Nelson, Osburn, Parks, Petrick, Pendleton, Porter, Preston, Price, Pugh, Rives
Goode, Jr., Tho F Goode, Harvie, Holcombe, Hunton, Isbell, Kledred, Lawson, Leake, Chas. K. Mallory, Jas. B. Mallory, Montague, Morris, Morton, Neblett, Randolph, Richardson, Seawell, Strange, Thornton, Robt. H. Turner, Franklin P. Turner, Tyler, Williams, Wise, and Woods.--37. Nays.--Messrs Janney, (President,) Armstrong, Asion, Baldwin, Baylor, Berlin, Blow, Boggess, Boyd, Brent, Brown, Burdett, Burley, Byrne, Cabell, Campbell, Carlile, Chapman, Clemens, C. R. Conrad, Robt. Y. Conrad, Couch, James H. Cox, Custis, Deskins, Dorman, Dulany, Early, Echols, Forbes, Fugate, Garland, Gillespie, Gravely, Gray, Goggin, Addison Hall, Cyrus Hall, Ephraim B. Hall, Hammond, Haymond, Hoge, Holladay, Hubbard, Hughes, Huil, Jackson, Marmaduke Johnson, Peter C. Johnston, Kilby, Lewis, McComas, McGrew, McNeil, Macfarland, Marshall, Marye, Maslin, Masters, Miller, Moffet, Nelson, Osburn, Parks, Petrick, Pendleton, Porter, Preston, Price, Pugh, Rives, Robt. E. Scott, Sharp, Sheffey, Sitlingtone Sl
was a sovereign nation in this land, and that the States were mere dependencies upon it. If this doctrine were to prevail, then farewell to Republican liberty, for Mr. Lincoln and Gen. Scott could come here with their armies and disperse this Convention. He intended to express his views fully hereafter; but he would say to the war-horse of Prince George, and his friends, that if they succeeded in carrying their doctrine of consolidation, the people would repudiate it. Mr. Carlile, of Harrison, took the floor, and called the attention of the gentleman from Middlesex to the language of the Declaration of Independence; he thought if the doctrines advocated by the gentleman were true, the authors of that instrument did not understand their own work. He quoted from the debates of 1788, from the opinions of Madison, the speeches of Calhoun, to show that the ground occupied in this Convention was untenable. Mr. Dorman, of Rockbridge, gave reasons why he should vote against the am
rner, the yeas and nays were demanded by Mr. Conrad, of Frederick. The roll was then called, and the vote resulted as follows: Yeas.--Messrs. Ambler, Blakey, Boisseau, Borst, Chambliss, Coffman, Conn, Richard H. Cox, Fisher, Graham, Gregory, John Goode, Jr., Tho F Goode, Harvie, Holcombe, Hunton, Isbell, Kledred, Lawson, Leake, Chas. K. Mallory, Jas. B. Mallory, Montague, Morris, Morton, Neblett, Randolph, Richardson, Seawell, Strange, Thornton, Robt. H. Turner, Franklin P. Turner, Tyler, Williams, Wise, and Woods.--37. Nays.--Messrs Janney, (President,) Armstrong, Asion, Baldwin, Baylor, Berlin, Blow, Boggess, Boyd, Brent, Brown, Burdett, Burley, Byrne, Cabell, Campbell, Carlile, Chapman, Clemens, C. R. Conrad, Robt. Y. Conrad, Couch, James H. Cox, Custis, Deskins, Dorman, Dulany, Early, Echols, Forbes, Fugate, Garland, Gillespie, Gravely, Gray, Goggin, Addison Hall, Cyrus Hall, Ephraim B. Hall, Hammond, Haymond, Hoge, Holladay, Hubbard, Hughes, Huil, Jackson, Marmaduk
ph, Richardson, Seawell, Strange, Thornton, Robt. H. Turner, Franklin P. Turner, Tyler, Williams, Wise, and Woods.--37. Nays.--Messrs Janney, (President,) Armstrong, Asion, Baldwin, Baylor, Berlie took the ground that Virginia was dependent upon the will of a Confederated Government. Mr. Wise replied to Mr. Scott, declaring that the State of Virginia was more independent now than she wa as it stood, asserted no dangerous doctrine, and was acceptable to him without amendment. Mr. Wise replied to Mr. Macfarland. He did not know that any one claimed absolute sovereignty for a Staight be dragged into a foreign war, against her will, she should be regarded as sovereign? Mr. Wise replied that she would. He referred, in support of this position, to the Confederacies of Eurom Portsmouth, attaches unequivocally to the sovereignty and independence of a States. Pending Mr. Wise's remarks, the hour of 2 having arrived, the Committee took a recess till 4 o'clock P. M.
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