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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 1, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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n went into Committee of the Whole, (Mr. Southall, of Albemarle, in the Chair,) and proceeded to consider the reports of the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Bruce, of Halifax, being entitled to the floor, continued his remarks. After a humorous allusion to the hopelessness of a cause which required members to occupy t at that time, for measures to keep the Federal troops from coercing that State. The gentleman had also held him up as an exceedingly bellicose character-- Mr. Bruce said he merely passed a friendly jeet; he certainly intended no offence. Mr. Moore said the jest had gone forth to the country, and he wished to have it undman from Halifax, closing by saying that he had never, like him, owned sugar plantations at the South; if he had, it might have some influence in his views. Mr. Bruce,--I have sold out, now. Mr. Moore said it would have been well if he had also sold out some of the prejudices which he picked up there. The Chairman st
liberty to move that the Committee rise. He regarded the report of the committee as an improvement upon the Peace Conference propositions; if the vote were to be taken now upon the question of striking out and inserting, he would be compelled to vote against it. Remarks were made by Mr. Fisher, of Northampton, in favor of taking the vote at once. Mr. Clemens renewed the call for a division of the question, but Mr. Harvie objected, and the Convention sustained the objection. Mr. Early did not want his vote to be constructed as a condemnation of the Peace Propositions. Mr. Baldwin said that in giving his vote he did not view the present as a test question in regard to the Peace Conference propositions. He was willing to take those propositions unamended, but he would not vote for them in competition with the report of the committee. Mr. Clemens was opposed to taking a vote in the absence of the mover of the substitute. In the vote he should give, he did not i
the proper time. Mr. Hall, or Wetzel, made some remarks touching upon the Constitution of the Confederate States, which he regarded as the best the world ever saw. He hoped it would be presented to the North as Virginia's ultimatum. The report of the Peace Conference, proposed by the gentleman from Harrison, he regarded as a cheat and a fraud. Mr. Brown, of Preston, called for a division of the question — so that the vote might be first taken upon the motion to strike out. Mr. Price, of Greenbrier, and Mr. Conrad, of Frederick, appealed to the member from Preston to withdraw his call for a division, which he consented to do. Mr. Clemens, of Ohio, said, as the gentle-from Harrison, who offered the competing proposition, was absent, he hoped the Committee would withdraw the substitute, by general consent. This course was objected to. Some interrogatories were here propounded by Mr. Wise as to which report of the Committee on Federal Relations was now to b
rose to a privileged question, and proceeded to correct some portion of his remarks on Friday and Saturday, as reported in the official organ of the Convention, the Richmond Enquirer Mr. Boisseac, of Dinwiddle, made a similar correction of his remarks on Saturday. Equality of taxation. The President announced the pending question, namely the resolutions on the subject of taxation and representation, offered by the gentleman from Monongahela, (Mr. Willey,) Mr. Turnek, of Jackson, being entitled to the floor, addressed the Convention. He desired the withdrawal of the resolutions, and advocated the adoption of a series offered by himself, early in the session. He maintained that they covered the whole subject wherein the people of his section demanded a change in the organic law, and he utterly repudiated the idea that the question had been introduced here to distract the counsels of the Convention. It had been his belief that the matters pertaining to Federal Rel
Virginia State Convention.thirty-fourth day. Monday,March 25, 1861. The Convention was called to order at 10 o'clock Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Solomon, of the Disciples Church. personal Explanations. Mr. Hall, of Marion, rose to a privileged question, and proceeded to correct some portion of his remarks on Friday and Saturday, as reported in the official organ of the Convention, the Richmond Enquirer Mr. Boisseac, of Dinwiddle, made a similar correction of his remarks on Saturday. Equality of taxation. The President announced the pending question, namely the resolutions on the subject of taxation and representation, offered by the gentleman from Monongahela, (Mr. Willey,) Mr. Turnek, of Jackson, being entitled to the floor, addressed the Convention. He desired the withdrawal of the resolutions, and advocated the adoption of a series offered by himself, early in the session. He maintained that they covered the whole subject wherein the people of h
he regarded as the best the world ever saw. He hoped it would be presented to the North as Virginia's ultimatum. The report of the Peace Conference, proposed by the gentleman from Harrison, he regarded as a cheat and a fraud. Mr. Brown, of Preston, called for a division of the question — so that the vote might be first taken upon the motion to strike out. Mr. Price, of Greenbrier, and Mr. Conrad, of Frederick, appealed to the member from Preston to withdraw his call for a division, wPreston to withdraw his call for a division, which he consented to do. Mr. Clemens, of Ohio, said, as the gentle-from Harrison, who offered the competing proposition, was absent, he hoped the Committee would withdraw the substitute, by general consent. This course was objected to. Some interrogatories were here propounded by Mr. Wise as to which report of the Committee on Federal Relations was now to be acted on by the Committee of the Whole. The Chair decided that the whole report, embracing the partial report first ma
O. J. Wise (search for this): article 1
on? Voices.--"Question — question." Mr. Wise asked if the motion in this form would precluwas about to re-state the question, when Mr. Wise arose, and said that the President having don Some interrogatories were here propounded by Mr. Wise as to which report of the Committee on Federan Federal Relations, took the same view. Mr. Wise contended that there were two reports and thae first. After some further remarks from Mr. Wise, Mr. Summers, of Kanawha, said that he tort of the committee was an improvement. Mr. Wise called for the reading of the substitute offet was accordingly read by the Secretary. Mr. Wise said that he was satisfied that it was the Pel manner, pretty well spiced with humor, by Messrs. Wise, Summers, Baldwin and Baylor, until the houcome for the Committee to take a recess. Mr. Wise.--Do we rise by the clock, sir? The Chaie resolution provides for a recess at 2. Mr. Wise.--I obey the clock. [Laughter.] The Com
ave a majority. The voice of the people was coming up, and if the Convention remained here long enough, they would decide the issue. He opposed the adjournment of the Convention, which had been proposed, to meet again at some future day. Mr. Baylor, of Augusta, desired that his vote should not be construed into a disapproval of the Peace Conference propositions, which had been, and still would be, satisfactory to him. He thought the report of the committee was an improvement. Mr. Wis Mr. Wise said that he was satisfied that it was the Peace Conference propositions, without any change. The debate was then continued in a some what conversational manner, pretty well spiced with humor, by Messrs. Wise, Summers, Baldwin and Baylor, until the hour of 2 o'clock arrived, when the Chairman said the time had come for the Committee to take a recess. Mr. Wise.--Do we rise by the clock, sir? The Chair.--The resolution provides for a recess at 2. Mr. Wise.--I obey th
After some further remarks from Mr. Wise, Mr. Summers, of Kanawha, said that he thought, since the gentleman from Harrison was absent, the vote should not be taken now, though he did not feel at liberty to move that the Committee rise. He regarded the report of the committee as an improvement upon the Peace Conference propositions; if the vote were to be taken now upon the question of striking out and inserting, he would be compelled to vote against it. Remarks were made by Mr. Fisher, of Northampton, in favor of taking the vote at once. Mr. Clemens renewed the call for a division of the question, but Mr. Harvie objected, and the Convention sustained the objection. Mr. Early did not want his vote to be constructed as a condemnation of the Peace Propositions. Mr. Baldwin said that in giving his vote he did not view the present as a test question in regard to the Peace Conference propositions. He was willing to take those propositions unamended, but he wou
ger at. He thought he could see that in the Southern flag which would do what the present flag would not do — protect the rights and honor of Virginia. Mr. Moore, of Rockbridge, arose to correct the position of the gentleman from Halifax, as stated on Saturday, in reference to South Carolina thirty odd years ago. He (Mr. ntleman had also held him up as an exceedingly bellicose character-- Mr. Bruce said he merely passed a friendly jeet; he certainly intended no offence. Mr. Moore said the jest had gone forth to the country, and he wished to have it understood. He had voted in the committee uniformly against coercion. He was in favor of t he had never, like him, owned sugar plantations at the South; if he had, it might have some influence in his views. Mr. Bruce,--I have sold out, now. Mr. Moore said it would have been well if he had also sold out some of the prejudices which he picked up there. The Chairman stated the question to be upon the motion
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