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t a misrepresentation under which many persons now labored, in regard to his position on the question in the Convention of 1850-'51. It was charged that he was the author of the clause exempting negroes under 12 years of age from taxation, but this ted no exemption — asked none — but was forced to take it. He then gave a history of the transactions in the Convention of 1850-'51, and went on to say that if this question was to divide us now, he would advise its relinquishment, as he advised his and patriotic service which he rendered, not to Western Virginia alone, but to all the Commonwealth, in the Convention of 1850-'51.--He proceeded to make some slight correction in the history of that Convention, which Mr. Wise accepted. Mr. Summersfew moments. Mr. Stuart then yielded the floor, and Mr. Early stated some facts in connection with the Convention of 1850-'51. He now acknowledged the justice of the principle contended for, and advised the passage of the resolutions for raisi
Doddridge (search for this): article 2
e moved that it be printed. Agreed to. Mr. Wise inquired what had become of the question of taxation, which had been heretofore under consideration? The President said it was now properly before the Convention, and the gentleman from Doddridge (Mr. Stuart) was entitled to the floor. Mr. Wise desired to avail himself of the opportunity to correct a misrepresentation under which many persons now labored, in regard to his position on the question in the Convention of 1850-'51. It e history of that Convention, which Mr. Wise accepted. Mr. Summers said he did not despair of the Republic then, nor did he despair of it now. Mr. Early trusted the Convention would pardon him for making a few remarks. Mr. Stuart, of Doddridge, claimed the floor. He was willing to have the vote taken now, if there was to be no more discussion of the subject; but if there was, he desired an opportunity of presenting his views. He asked the gentleman from Franklin if he proposed to d
he Committee rise. The motion was agreed to, and the Committee rose and reported progress. In Convention. Mr. Early, of Franklin, presented a substitute, which he proposed to offer, for the report of the Committee on Federal Relations. which Mr. Wise accepted. Mr. Summers said he did not despair of the Republic then, nor did he despair of it now. Mr. Early trusted the Convention would pardon him for making a few remarks. Mr. Stuart, of Doddridge, claimed the floor. Henting his views. He asked the gentleman from Franklin if he proposed to discuss the question under consideration. Mr. Early only asked for a few moments. Mr. Stuart then yielded the floor, and Mr. Early stated some facts in connection wiMr. Early stated some facts in connection with the Convention of 1850-'51. He now acknowledged the justice of the principle contended for, and advised the passage of the resolutions for raising a committee, who could report at the adjourned session. Pending the consideration of the subj
rrection in the history of that Convention, which Mr. Wise accepted. Mr. Summers said he did not despair of the Republic then, nor did he despair of it now. Mr. Early trusted the Convention would pardon him for making a few remarks. Mr. Stuart, of Doddridge, claimed the floor. He was willing to have the vote taken now, if there was to be no more discussion of the subject; but if there was, he desired an opportunity of presenting his views. He asked the gentleman from Franklin if he proposed to discuss the question under consideration. Mr. Early only asked for a few moments. Mr. Stuart then yielded the floor, and Mr. Early stated some facts in connection with the Convention of 1850-'51. He now acknowledged the justice of the principle contended for, and advised the passage of the resolutions for raising a committee, who could report at the adjourned session. Pending the consideration of the subject-- On motion of Mr. Echols, the Convention adjourned.
be entitled to the lasting gratitude of posterity. Mr. Scott, of Fauquier, said he understood the time had nearly arrived at which the Committee usually rose. He desired to give some views upon a subject so engrossing as the question under debate, but was reluctant to farther exhaust the patience of the Committee at this time. He therefore moved that the Committee rise. The motion was agreed to, and the Committee rose and reported progress. In Convention. Mr. Early, of Franklin, presented a substitute, which he proposed to offer, for the report of the Committee on Federal Relations. He did so with a view to place himself on the record in such a manner that there should be no possibility of misunderstanding his position as a Union man, here or hereafter. He moved that it be printed. Agreed to. Mr. Wise inquired what had become of the question of taxation, which had been heretofore under consideration? The President said it was now properly before the
Macfarland (search for this): article 2
Evening session. The Committee re-assembled at 4 o'clock, and Mr. Macfarland resumed his remarks. He said he had, in the morning, invited the attention of the Committee to a practical view of the method by which the great question now agitating the country might be definitely settled. His object was to show that if the subject of slavery was to be taken out of the halls of legislation, and withdrawn from the fields of agitation, we might yet live on terms of friendship and respect wiosed to quarrel with her on that account.--He apprehended that, as strong as the Southern Confederacy was, she would not object to an addition to her strength, if it could be done with perfect security and without sacrifice of principle. Mr. Macfarland went on with an elaborate argument on the question of the Tariff, to show that the Southern Confederacy was not entitled to any particular favor from Virginia upon the ground of her avowed policy of free trade; yet he was so firmly attached b
nia upon the ground of her avowed policy of free trade; yet he was so firmly attached by every consideration to the Gulf States, that he would be unwilling, under any fair circumstances, to turn his back upon them. He was in favor of a further and final effort to reconstruct the Union; and whoever should have the good fortune to so shape the course of events as to bring about a peaceful solution of the great questions at issue, would be entitled to the lasting gratitude of posterity. Mr. Scott, of Fauquier, said he understood the time had nearly arrived at which the Committee usually rose. He desired to give some views upon a subject so engrossing as the question under debate, but was reluctant to farther exhaust the patience of the Committee at this time. He therefore moved that the Committee rise. The motion was agreed to, and the Committee rose and reported progress. In Convention. Mr. Early, of Franklin, presented a substitute, which he proposed to offer, for
of taxation, which had been heretofore under consideration? The President said it was now properly before the Convention, and the gentleman from Doddridge (Mr. Stuart) was entitled to the floor. Mr. Wise desired to avail himself of the opportunity to correct a misrepresentation under which many persons now labored, in reaid he did not despair of the Republic then, nor did he despair of it now. Mr. Early trusted the Convention would pardon him for making a few remarks. Mr. Stuart, of Doddridge, claimed the floor. He was willing to have the vote taken now, if there was to be no more discussion of the subject; but if there was, he desiredg his views. He asked the gentleman from Franklin if he proposed to discuss the question under consideration. Mr. Early only asked for a few moments. Mr. Stuart then yielded the floor, and Mr. Early stated some facts in connection with the Convention of 1850-'51. He now acknowledged the justice of the principle conten
ld not compare with it in bitterness. It would be the sting which a brother might give to a brother — the sting of ingratitude; and if the war came between them, it would be more hostile than all the wars that hell itself could engender. Mr. Summers, of Kanawha, said he was sure the gentleman from Princess Anne did not need his testimony in regard to the gallant and patriotic service which he rendered, not to Western Virginia alone, but to all the Commonwealth, in the Convention of 1850-'51.--He proceeded to make some slight correction in the history of that Convention, which Mr. Wise accepted. Mr. Summers said he did not despair of the Republic then, nor did he despair of it now. Mr. Early trusted the Convention would pardon him for making a few remarks. Mr. Stuart, of Doddridge, claimed the floor. He was willing to have the vote taken now, if there was to be no more discussion of the subject; but if there was, he desired an opportunity of presenting his views. He
France (France) (search for this): article 2
the institution of slavery as we were, and if the question of its extinction were presented to them, it would be decided in the negative.--They were dependent upon it for subsistence, and you might as well expect that the collieries of England would be abandoned, as that the Yankees would consent to their own impoverishment by the abolition of slavery at the South. There was, he assumed, a change going on in the sentiment of the world on the subject, as shown by the employment of coolies by France and England. We had a right to insist that the North should let us alone, and he believed that when the naked issue was presented, the North would recede from its aggressive position rather than encounter the evils which must result from a continued agitation of the slavery question. Alluding to the grandeur of the Union in the eyes of the world, he thought it would be time enough to pass sentence upon it after our best efforts for its preservation shall have failed. He looked upon it as
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