hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 18 0 Browse Search
George H. Baldwin 14 0 Browse Search
House 14 0 Browse Search
J. J. Hall 12 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 12 0 Browse Search
Cuba (Cuba) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas R. Sharp 11 1 Browse Search
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) 11 1 Browse Search
James Barbour 11 1 Browse Search
Tredway 11 11 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 2, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 86 total hits in 35 results.

1 2 3 4
George H. Baldwin (search for this): article 2
the other side, admitted that the Government, as it now stands, does not give safety and protection to the South. Mr. Baldwin.--As I am one of those referred to as having taken that position. I desire to place myself right. I assumed that theeded to examine the principles upon which the Government was formed, and then to comment upon the positions assumed by Mr. Baldwin, and asked, if this Government had always been administered on Virginia principles, how it happened that he had alwaysanctioned the measures of the Federal Administration, mentioning, among other things, the alien and sedition law. Mr. Baldwin said the gentleman had strangely misapprehended his position. He had alluded solely to the measures of the Governmentow $42,000 to her credit, which she refused to receive; and after a brief argument to show that the theory advanced by Mr. Baldwin, that the majority should rule, was erroneous and untenable, he submitted a motion that the Committee rise. The m
James Barbour (search for this): article 2
was not that "nobody had been hurt" by the success of the Black Republican party, but that the prophesied evils had not come to pass. He went on the advise the policy of waiting until the experiment of the new Government shall have proved successful, before relinquishing one which had been acknowledged to be the grandest upon earth. The report of the Committee of Twenty-One distinctly takes the ground that the Southern Confederacy ought to be acknowledged. The gentleman from Culpeper (Mr. Barbour) had read from the London news, the organ of Exeter Hall, to show that England would recognize the new Confederacy. He (Mr. Tredway) thought it perfectly natural that England, the worst enemy of the South, should recognize any policy foreshadowing the destruction of this country. She dare not attack us united; but divided, it would be easier for her to carry into effect her cherished desire to conquer the continent. He called attention to the fleets now being fitted out by foreign Gove
ses of Mr. Southall, that the highly respectable gentlemen who composed that meeting were under a misapprehension. Mr. Blakey, of Madison, presented a series of resolutions adopted by one of the largest meetings ever held in that county. He sairule. The resolutions go for immediate secession, and oppose the sending of a representative to the next Congress, &c. Mr. Blakey moved that they be referred to the Committee on Federal Relations and printed. Mr. Early, of Franklin, objected to, asked if there was not a citizen of Madison who was now a candidate for a seat in the Black Republican Congress. Mr. Blakey said that the gentleman from Franklin seemed very anxious to economize, but had just delivered a speech, the printing o, and still protested against the printing of matter which had nothing to do with the business of this Convention. Mr. Blakey merely asked that the resolutions should take the course which others had taken. With regard to the question previousl
that the gentleman from Franklin had voted for the printing of a series of Black Republican resolutions heretofore offered in this Convention. Mr. Early was not aware that any such resolutions had been offered. Mr. Hall said he alluded to a series of resolutions offered by the member from Marshall, (Mr. Burley). Mr. Dorman, of Rockbridge, said that as the member from Madison had incorporated the resolutions in his remarks, they would have been printed without a motion. Mr. Borst, of Page, advocated the motion. A series of resolutions adopted in the city of Petersburg were ordered to be printed, and yet they contained no word of instructions. The question was them put, and carried in the affirmative. Mr. Nelson, of Clark, desired to correct some errors in the report of his speech in the Richmond Enquirer. He pointed out three or four; one of which was the name of a character of Scott's, Triptolemus Yellowley, which was printed Triptolemus Yellowleg.--An
ndidate for Congress in his county, he was not aware of it. Mr. Morton, of Orange, advocated the motion to print and refer. Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, called attention to the fact that the gentleman from Franklin had voted for the printing of a series of Black Republican resolutions heretofore offered in this Convention. Mr. Early was not aware that any such resolutions had been offered. Mr. Hall said he alluded to a series of resolutions offered by the member from Marshall, (Mr. Burley). Mr. Dorman, of Rockbridge, said that as the member from Madison had incorporated the resolutions in his remarks, they would have been printed without a motion. Mr. Borst, of Page, advocated the motion. A series of resolutions adopted in the city of Petersburg were ordered to be printed, and yet they contained no word of instructions. The question was them put, and carried in the affirmative. Mr. Nelson, of Clark, desired to correct some errors in the report of his sp
of resolutions offered by the member from Marshall, (Mr. Burley). Mr. Dorman, of Rockbridge, said that as the member from Madison had incorporated the resolutions in his remarks, they would have been printed without a motion. Mr. Borst, of Page, advocated the motion. A series of resolutions adopted in the city of Petersburg were ordered to be printed, and yet they contained no word of instructions. The question was them put, and carried in the affirmative. Mr. Nelson, of Clark, desired to correct some errors in the report of his speech in the Richmond Enquirer. He pointed out three or four; one of which was the name of a character of Scott's, Triptolemus Yellowley, which was printed Triptolemus Yellowleg.--Another, still more provoking, (for he had some regard for his position as a scholar,) was a quotation from Virgil, "Tantae, ne irae celestibus, " the concluding word of which was printed celestip. As it related to the ladies, he hoped the bus would be added.
ublican resolutions heretofore offered in this Convention. Mr. Early was not aware that any such resolutions had been offered. Mr. Hall said he alluded to a series of resolutions offered by the member from Marshall, (Mr. Burley). Mr. Dorman, of Rockbridge, said that as the member from Madison had incorporated the resolutions in his remarks, they would have been printed without a motion. Mr. Borst, of Page, advocated the motion. A series of resolutions adopted in the city of irae celestibus, " the concluding word of which was printed celestip. As it related to the ladies, he hoped the bus would be added. [Laughter.] Mr. Montague, on behalf of the reporters, desired to say that the gentleman's speech was printed from his own manuscript! [Great laughter.] Mr. Nelson acknowledged the fact, and admitted that his chirography was hard to decipher. These important matters having been disposed of-- On motion of Mr. Dorman, the Convention adjourned.
d oppose the sending of a representative to the next Congress, &c. Mr. Blakey moved that they be referred to the Committee on Federal Relations and printed. Mr. Early, of Franklin, objected to burdening the State with the expense of printing resolutions which contain no instructions, and contemplate no action by this Conventior, but desired to gag the people themselves. In his own course here, he (Mr. B.) did not need instructions, for he knew the sentiments of his constituents. Mr. Early made a reply, and still protested against the printing of matter which had nothing to do with the business of this Convention. Mr. Blakey merely asked that n to the fact that the gentleman from Franklin had voted for the printing of a series of Black Republican resolutions heretofore offered in this Convention. Mr. Early was not aware that any such resolutions had been offered. Mr. Hall said he alluded to a series of resolutions offered by the member from Marshall, (Mr. Burl
tings ever held in that county. He said the gentlemen who participated were of the highest respectability. They loved the Union, and would still adhere to it if it was to be administered in the spirit of the fathers; but they would never submit to Black Republican rule. The resolutions go for immediate secession, and oppose the sending of a representative to the next Congress, &c. Mr. Blakey moved that they be referred to the Committee on Federal Relations and printed. Mr. Early, of Franklin, objected to burdening the State with the expense of printing resolutions which contain no instructions, and contemplate no action by this Convention. He protested against any such practice, and, after an allusion to the sentiments of the resolutions, asked if there was not a citizen of Madison who was now a candidate for a seat in the Black Republican Congress. Mr. Blakey said that the gentleman from Franklin seemed very anxious to economize, but had just delivered a speech, the prin
. Tredway resumed his remarks, proceeding first to correct any misapprehension which might have existed in reference to his reply to the gentleman from Bedford, (Mr. Goode,) this morning. The position which he occupied was not that "nobody had been hurt" by the success of the Black Republican party, but that the prophesied evils hand untenable, he submitted a motion that the Committee rise. The motion was agreed to, and the Committee rose and reported progress. In Convention. Mr. Goode, of Bedford, said that in obedience to the request of a portion of his constituents, he would present the proceedings of two public meetings in his county. One,ressed. The resolutions (which favor immediate secession and protest against any change in the system of taxation at this time, &c.) were, at the request of Mr. Goode, laid on the table. Mr. Harvie, of Amelia, presented a series of resolutions adopted by a large meeting of the citizens of that county — the largest he ever
1 2 3 4