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Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): article 13
ast, on leaving the store, Mr. Bigelow told his book-keeper that he should return at 12 M. on the following day. The promise was not fulfilled, nor has he, up to the present time, made his appearance. As surprise began to be created at the store at his non-arrival, and as the hands of the clock told the highly important hour of 2 o'clock, there marched in a Bank messenger with two protested notes, of the amount of $800 each, and purporting to be signed by a single customer of Bigelow's in Minnesota. Investigation revealed the fact that the notes were forgeries, and there then followed discoveries of much other paper of the same character as in circulution — some of it having been purchased by Alderman & Gore, bankers and brokers, No. 26 Kilby street. Everything in the shape of notes receivable, both genuine and bogus, which he could possibly dispose of, seemed to have been turned into cash, and in addition to the amounts which he is said to have borrowed from various parties, one of
Cambridgeport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 13
ss for a long while, he had the reputation of standing A 1, and from a general knowledge of this fact does the surprise at the occurrence principally arise. In 1857 the firm of Bigelow, Ball & Knight failed, but they gave the excellent dividend of eighty cents on the dollar, and continued under the new title of Bigelow & Knight. So organized, the firm remained until a month or two ago, but recently Mr. Bigelow purchased the interest of his partner, (Mr. Samuel D. Knight, who resides at Cambridgeport,) and paid him with his own notes endorsed by a brother at the West. These Mr. Knight still holds, and there is at present the possibility, if not the probability, of his being one of the greatest sufferers. On Friday night last, on leaving the store, Mr. Bigelow told his book-keeper that he should return at 12 M. on the following day. The promise was not fulfilled, nor has he, up to the present time, made his appearance. As surprise began to be created at the store at his non-arr
Grafton, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 13
time. [It is surmised that he took the night train for N. York, and left on the following day in the steamer for Europe.] Although the amount forged will not fall short, as it is thought, of the sum of $50,000, the amount discovered as certainly involved up to the present time is only $10,000. Each succeeding day for a week or two will probably bring to light fresh instances. The motive of Mr. Bigelow is unaccountable. He has at certain periods of his life been deemed quite wealthy, and those who ought to know say that his concern was solvent at the time of these illegal transactions. One of those who know him intimately gives the opinion that "he probably desired to get rid of old associates, and live alone and independently." But the secret is locked in his own heart, and we only wonder at the picture as shown us. He is a man nearly fifty years of age, and has two daughters of sixteen and ten. He came originally from Grafton and has numerous relatives in that vicinity.
Edwin W. Stratton (search for this): article 13
ed the fact that the notes were forgeries, and there then followed discoveries of much other paper of the same character as in circulution — some of it having been purchased by Alderman & Gore, bankers and brokers, No. 26 Kilby street. Everything in the shape of notes receivable, both genuine and bogus, which he could possibly dispose of, seemed to have been turned into cash, and in addition to the amounts which he is said to have borrowed from various parties, one of his clerks, named Edwin W. Stratton, is a victim to the amount of about $1,500. Upon inquiring at his house, No. 62 West Newton street, the wife of the absconding merchant stated that her husband had left home at 7 P. M. on Friday last, with the remark that he couldn't meet his creditors, that he must fail, and that he should leave home for a short time. [It is surmised that he took the night train for N. York, and left on the following day in the steamer for Europe.] Although the amount forged will not fall short,
n addition to the amounts which he is said to have borrowed from various parties, one of his clerks, named Edwin W. Stratton, is a victim to the amount of about $1,500. Upon inquiring at his house, No. 62 West Newton street, the wife of the absconding merchant stated that her husband had left home at 7 P. M. on Friday last, with the remark that he couldn't meet his creditors, that he must fail, and that he should leave home for a short time. [It is surmised that he took the night train for N. York, and left on the following day in the steamer for Europe.] Although the amount forged will not fall short, as it is thought, of the sum of $50,000, the amount discovered as certainly involved up to the present time is only $10,000. Each succeeding day for a week or two will probably bring to light fresh instances. The motive of Mr. Bigelow is unaccountable. He has at certain periods of his life been deemed quite wealthy, and those who ought to know say that his concern was solvent at
H. D. P. Bigelow (search for this): article 13
riefly mentioned by telegraph Friday morning.--It seems that Mr. H. D. P. Bigelow, shoe and leather dealer at No. 75 Pearl street, has been gusurprise at the occurrence principally arise. In 1857 the firm of Bigelow, Ball & Knight failed, but they gave the excellent dividend of eighty cents on the dollar, and continued under the new title of Bigelow & Knight. So organized, the firm remained until a month or two ago, but recently Mr. Bigelow purchased the interest of his partner, (Mr. Samuel D. Knight, who resides at Cambridgeport,) and paid him with his owntest sufferers. On Friday night last, on leaving the store, Mr. Bigelow told his book-keeper that he should return at 12 M. on the follo of $800 each, and purporting to be signed by a single customer of Bigelow's in Minnesota. Investigation revealed the fact that the notes wetwo will probably bring to light fresh instances. The motive of Mr. Bigelow is unaccountable. He has at certain periods of his life been de
Samuel D. Knight (search for this): article 13
eneral knowledge of this fact does the surprise at the occurrence principally arise. In 1857 the firm of Bigelow, Ball & Knight failed, but they gave the excellent dividend of eighty cents on the dollar, and continued under the new title of Bigelow & Knight. So organized, the firm remained until a month or two ago, but recently Mr. Bigelow purchased the interest of his partner, (Mr. Samuel D. Knight, who resides at Cambridgeport,) and paid him with his own notes endorsed by a brother at the WeMr. Samuel D. Knight, who resides at Cambridgeport,) and paid him with his own notes endorsed by a brother at the West. These Mr. Knight still holds, and there is at present the possibility, if not the probability, of his being one of the greatest sufferers. On Friday night last, on leaving the store, Mr. Bigelow told his book-keeper that he should return atMr. Knight still holds, and there is at present the possibility, if not the probability, of his being one of the greatest sufferers. On Friday night last, on leaving the store, Mr. Bigelow told his book-keeper that he should return at 12 M. on the following day. The promise was not fulfilled, nor has he, up to the present time, made his appearance. As surprise began to be created at the store at his non-arrival, and as the hands of the clock told the highly important hour of 2 o
an to be created at the store at his non-arrival, and as the hands of the clock told the highly important hour of 2 o'clock, there marched in a Bank messenger with two protested notes, of the amount of $800 each, and purporting to be signed by a single customer of Bigelow's in Minnesota. Investigation revealed the fact that the notes were forgeries, and there then followed discoveries of much other paper of the same character as in circulution — some of it having been purchased by Alderman & Gore, bankers and brokers, No. 26 Kilby street. Everything in the shape of notes receivable, both genuine and bogus, which he could possibly dispose of, seemed to have been turned into cash, and in addition to the amounts which he is said to have borrowed from various parties, one of his clerks, named Edwin W. Stratton, is a victim to the amount of about $1,500. Upon inquiring at his house, No. 62 West Newton street, the wife of the absconding merchant stated that her husband had left home at 7 P.
criptions. but principally notes, to a very large sum, amounting in the aggregate, it is thought, to nearly $50,000, and that he has borrowed great sums of money from friends and business acquaintances — and that with all this wealth he has left for parts unknown. The Post says: Having done a large and profitable Western business for a long while, he had the reputation of standing A 1, and from a general knowledge of this fact does the surprise at the occurrence principally arise. In 1857 the firm of Bigelow, Ball & Knight failed, but they gave the excellent dividend of eighty cents on the dollar, and continued under the new title of Bigelow & Knight. So organized, the firm remained until a month or two ago, but recently Mr. Bigelow purchased the interest of his partner, (Mr. Samuel D. Knight, who resides at Cambridgeport,) and paid him with his own notes endorsed by a brother at the West. These Mr. Knight still holds, and there is at present the possibility, if not the prob