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e other States, make it proper, in the judgment of this Convention, that the former Stated should consult together and concert such measures for their final action as the honor, the interests and the safety of the people thereof may demand, and for that purpose the proper authorities of those States are requested to appoint Commissioners to meet Commissioners to be appointed by this Convention on behalf of the people of this State, at Frankfort, in the State of Kentucky, on the last Monday in May next. Mr. Flournoy moved to pass by the resolution for the present, with a view to considering the proposed amendments to the Federal Constitution. Mr. Conrad of Frederick, opposed the motion to pass by. It was lost by a large majority. Mr. Scott, of Fauquier, deemed it proper that some action should be taken in view of the possible rejection of the propositions by the non-slaveholding States. He had before indicated his purpose to offer an amendment to the 14th resolution, bu
ions pending since the failure of the Peace Conference, and he could see no good reason for adopting a resolution referring to negotiations for adjustment. Mr. Baldwin hoped the resolution would be retained. It contained the only remonstrance; against action on the part of the seceded States to provoke hostilities; and this, on demanded a conference with the Border States; if they refused to take any action, then Virginia would be left free to act as the circumstances required. Mr. Baldwin moved to amend the amendment by filling the first blank with the word "Frankfort," but withdrew it. He then moved to strike out from the amendment the words "at — on the --day of --." Mr. Baldwin spoke briefly upon his amendment. Mr. Moore, of Rockbridge, moved that the Committee rise, which was agreed to, and the Committee rose and reported progress. In Convention. Mr. Marr, of Fauquier, stated that he was reported in the Richmond Enquirer, which reports officially, as
e position of the question, considerable confusion prevailed, and Mr. Wise moved an adjournment, which was defeated. Mr. Willey said as the question was now between the substitute and the original resolutions, he would call for the yeas and nays in order to test the sense of the Convention.--He had offered the substitute with a view to make the competing proposition as nearly acceptable to himself as possible, and should now vote for the original resolutions. Messrs. Slaughter, Wise, Kent, Echols, Early and Brown defined their position; a very amusing colloquy between the last named gentlemen and Mr. Wise kept the house in a state of merriment. Pending the consideration of the subject, On motion of Mr. Branch, the Convention adjourned. Note. --In the vote just before the recess, on Tuesday, on Mr. Tarr's motion to strike out the last clause of the 11th resolution, the name of Mr. Dorman, of Rockbridge, was accidentally omitted. He voted in the negative.
Brent. Brown (search for this): article 2
position of the question, considerable confusion prevailed, and Mr. Wise moved an adjournment, which was defeated. Mr. Willey said as the question was now between the substitute and the original resolutions, he would call for the yeas and nays in order to test the sense of the Convention.--He had offered the substitute with a view to make the competing proposition as nearly acceptable to himself as possible, and should now vote for the original resolutions. Messrs. Slaughter, Wise, Kent, Echols, Early and Brown defined their position; a very amusing colloquy between the last named gentlemen and Mr. Wise kept the house in a state of merriment. Pending the consideration of the subject, On motion of Mr. Branch, the Convention adjourned. Note. --In the vote just before the recess, on Tuesday, on Mr. Tarr's motion to strike out the last clause of the 11th resolution, the name of Mr. Dorman, of Rockbridge, was accidentally omitted. He voted in the negative.
cted. The question recurring on Mr. Wise's motion to strike out all after the word "Commonwealth," it was decided in the negative — years 32. nays 79. Mr. Bruce, of Halifax, moved to strike out the whole 13th resolution. The principle was sufficiently expressed in previous resolutions. There were no negotiations pendininst action on the part of the seceded States to provoke hostilities; and this, he thought, was the distasteful feature to those who opposed the resolution. Mr. Bruce further urged the propriety of striking out. Mr. Johnson, of Richmond, moved to amend the amendment by striking out all after word "Government," in the secotuting the word "themselves"for "them," in the last line. Lost. Mr. Johnson'samendment was then agreed to — ayes 68, noes 48. The question recurred upon Mr. Bruce's motion to strike out the entire resolution as amended, and the roll being called, it was decided in the negative-- yeas 39, nays 86. The 13th resolution,
Robert Y. Conrad (search for this): article 2
s the honor, the interests and the safety of the people thereof may demand, and for that purpose the proper authorities of those States are requested to appoint Commissioners to meet Commissioners to be appointed by this Convention on behalf of the people of this State, at Frankfort, in the State of Kentucky, on the last Monday in May next. Mr. Flournoy moved to pass by the resolution for the present, with a view to considering the proposed amendments to the Federal Constitution. Mr. Conrad of Frederick, opposed the motion to pass by. It was lost by a large majority. Mr. Scott, of Fauquier, deemed it proper that some action should be taken in view of the possible rejection of the propositions by the non-slaveholding States. He had before indicated his purpose to offer an amendment to the 14th resolution, but finding that the friends of that resolution were averse to parting with any portion of it, and thinking it all important that a Conference with the Border States sh
ecial guardian of Mr. Preston's resolution, it was a little strange that he this morning took such a liberty with it himself. He forcibly urged the adoption of his amendment as the surest means of preserving the peace between the parties. Mr. Dorman moved to amend the amendment by substituting the word "themselves"for "them," in the last line. Lost. Mr. Johnson'samendment was then agreed to — ayes 68, noes 48. The question recurred upon Mr. Bruce's motion to strike out the entire ent, Echols, Early and Brown defined their position; a very amusing colloquy between the last named gentlemen and Mr. Wise kept the house in a state of merriment. Pending the consideration of the subject, On motion of Mr. Branch, the Convention adjourned. Note. --In the vote just before the recess, on Tuesday, on Mr. Tarr's motion to strike out the last clause of the 11th resolution, the name of Mr. Dorman, of Rockbridge, was accidentally omitted. He voted in the negative.
Jubal A. Early (search for this): article 2
s having made a speech on Saturday last, when in fact he made no speech. The remarks purporting to have been made by him were made by the member from Franklin, (Mr. Early.) Had he spoken upon the question at all, he would have expressed sentiments far different. Mr. Early then proceeded to note some errors in the report of thMr. Early then proceeded to note some errors in the report of the speech which he made on that occasion, and which had been attributed to the member from Fauquier, who might have deemed himself happy to have made use of such sentiments. Mr. Marr said if he had done so, his constitutions would have deemed it a gross misrepresentation of their views. Mr. Willey called up his resolutionshe competing proposition as nearly acceptable to himself as possible, and should now vote for the original resolutions. Messrs. Slaughter, Wise, Kent, Echols, Early and Brown defined their position; a very amusing colloquy between the last named gentlemen and Mr. Wise kept the house in a state of merriment. Pending the co
e position of the question, considerable confusion prevailed, and Mr. Wise moved an adjournment, which was defeated. Mr. Willey said as the question was now between the substitute and the original resolutions, he would call for the yeas and nays in order to test the sense of the Convention.--He had offered the substitute with a view to make the competing proposition as nearly acceptable to himself as possible, and should now vote for the original resolutions. Messrs. Slaughter, Wise, Kent, Echols, Early and Brown defined their position; a very amusing colloquy between the last named gentlemen and Mr. Wise kept the house in a state of merriment. Pending the consideration of the subject, On motion of Mr. Branch, the Convention adjourned. Note. --In the vote just before the recess, on Tuesday, on Mr. Tarr's motion to strike out the last clause of the 11th resolution, the name of Mr. Dorman, of Rockbridge, was accidentally omitted. He voted in the negative.
e it proper, in the judgment of this Convention, that the former Stated should consult together and concert such measures for their final action as the honor, the interests and the safety of the people thereof may demand, and for that purpose the proper authorities of those States are requested to appoint Commissioners to meet Commissioners to be appointed by this Convention on behalf of the people of this State, at Frankfort, in the State of Kentucky, on the last Monday in May next. Mr. Flournoy moved to pass by the resolution for the present, with a view to considering the proposed amendments to the Federal Constitution. Mr. Conrad of Frederick, opposed the motion to pass by. It was lost by a large majority. Mr. Scott, of Fauquier, deemed it proper that some action should be taken in view of the possible rejection of the propositions by the non-slaveholding States. He had before indicated his purpose to offer an amendment to the 14th resolution, but finding that the f
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