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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 15, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
: In all the present territory of the United States north of the parallel of 36 degrees and 30ited. In all the present territory of the United States south of said line of latitude, involuntarory which may hereafter be acquired by the United States, involuntary servitude is prohibited — exc 2. No territory shall be acquired by the United States, except by discovery and for naval and comf the following: "The Senators of the United States shall be divided into two classes, whereofss and disapproved by the President of the United States, take effect, unless the votes of a majoris under the exclusive jurisdiction of the United States, within those States and Territorial where service, in any State or Territory of the United States to any other State or Territory thereof, w or labor in any State or Territory of the United States, or in the District of Columbia, has been m shall be recognized and protected by the United States and their authorities as the rights of oth
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
Rev. Mr. Bosserman, of the Universalist Church. The resolution of Mr. Price, of Greenbrier, restricting debate to ten minutes on any one subject, being in order, Mr. Wise moved a call of the roll to ascertain if there was a quorum in attendance. Most of the members answered to their names. Mr. Price briefly advocated his resolution. The President stated that he had received a communication from the Governor of the Common wealth, enclosing a dispatch from Gov. Pickens, of South Carolina, which was read by the Secretary. It announces the commencement of hostilities, and says that no harm had thus far been done to the works of the Confederated army, but great damage had been done to Fort Sumter. Mr. Wise commented briefly upon the intelligence, closing with the expression of a hope that the "terrapin" (meaning the Union men) "would begin to crawl, now that the fire was applied to his back." The hour of half-past 10 having arrived, Mr. Southall was called to the
Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
section, and insert a resolution instructing the Committee on Federal Relations to report an ordinance resuming the powers delegated by Virginia to the General Government, and providing for equality of taxation in the event of the ratification of said ordinance by the people. The Chairman decided the amendment to be out of order, inasmuch as it embodied an instruction which could not be given by the Committee of the Whole. It was therefore sent back to the mover. Mr Bouldin, of Charlotte, moved to amend the first section by striking out, after the words "involuntary servitude," in the 5th line, the words "as it now exists," and inserting "of the African race, is allowed and hereby declared to exist, and shall not be abolished by any law of Congress or a Territorial Legislature, but the same as now protected by the laws of the Territory of New Mexico." Mr. Bouldin advocated his amendment, which he said had been offered in good faith, and with a view to make the languag
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
srs. Blow and Dorman, and rejected — yeas 44, nays 67. The second section was then adopted, without amendment. The third section was then taken up: 2. Neither the Constitution, nor any amendment thereof shall be construed to give Congress power to legislate concerning involuntary servitude in any state or Territory wherein the same is acknowledged, or may exist, by the laws thereof; nor to therefore with, or abolish, the same in the District of Columbia without the consent of Maryland and Virginia, and without the consent of the owner or making the owners, who do not consent, just compensation; nor the power to interfere with, or prohibit, representatives and others from bringing with them o the District of Columbia, re and taking away, persons so held to labor of service; nor the power to interfere with, or abolish, involuntary service in places under the exclusive jurisdiction of the United States, within those States and Territorial where the same is established or r
Louisa, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 1
but great damage had been done to Fort Sumter. Mr. Wise commented briefly upon the intelligence, closing with the expression of a hope that the "terrapin" (meaning the Union men) "would begin to crawl, now that the fire was applied to his back." The hour of half-past 10 having arrived, Mr. Southall was called to the Chair, and the Convention went into Committee of the whole, for the purpose of considering the report of the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Ambler, of Louisa, availed himself of an opportunity to respond to the courteous disclaimer of the gentleman from Augusta, (Mr. Baldwin.) He was satisfied with his explanation, and met it in the spirit which had prompted it. Mr. Whitfield, of Isle of Wight, also made a personal explanation. He continued his remarks by alluding to the commencement of hostilities as good and sufficient cause why Virginia should at once be taken out of the Union. The substitute offered by Mr. Boyd, of Botetourt, for t
Charles City (Iowa, United States) (search for this): article 1
for naval and commercial stations, depots, and transit routes, without the concurrence of a majority of all the Senators from States which allow involuntary servitude, and a majority of all the Senators from States which prohibit that relation; nor shall territory be acquired by treaty, unless the votes of a majority of the Senators from each class of states hereinbefore mentioned be cast as a part of the two-third majority, necessary to the ratification of such treaty. Mr. Tyler, of Charles City, moved to strike out the second section, and to insert in lieu thereof the following: "The Senators of the United States shall be divided into two classes, whereof the senators chosen by the States whose institutions forbid slavery shall compose one, and the Senators chosen by the States whose institutions admit slavery shall compose the other; and on the passage of any bill or resolution having the force of law, and on all appointments to office wherein the advice and consent of the
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
osing with the expression of a hope that the "terrapin" (meaning the Union men) "would begin to crawl, now that the fire was applied to his back." The hour of half-past 10 having arrived, Mr. Southall was called to the Chair, and the Convention went into Committee of the whole, for the purpose of considering the report of the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Ambler, of Louisa, availed himself of an opportunity to respond to the courteous disclaimer of the gentleman from Augusta, (Mr. Baldwin.) He was satisfied with his explanation, and met it in the spirit which had prompted it. Mr. Whitfield, of Isle of Wight, also made a personal explanation. He continued his remarks by alluding to the commencement of hostilities as good and sufficient cause why Virginia should at once be taken out of the Union. The substitute offered by Mr. Boyd, of Botetourt, for the 1st section of the proposed amendments to the Federal Constitution, being in order, it was read, as
the Senators composing either class the vote shall be taken by classes, and the concurrence of both classes shall be necessary to pass such bill or resolution into a law, or to confirm such appointment: Provided, that when the vote of both classes shall be equally divided, the Vice President may give the casting vote. Mr. Tyler urged the necessity of checks in the National legislation, in order to secure protection for the minority. Mr. Summers, of Kanawha, replied, referring to Mr. Calhoun's idea of a dual government among his objections. Mr. Thornton, of Prince Edward, offered the following as an addition to Mr. Tyler's amendment: "Nor shall any treaty be made unless the votes of a majority of the senators from each class of States hereinbefore mentioned be cast on a part of the two-thirds majority necessary to the ratification of such treaty; nor shall any bill, order, resolution or vote which has been passed by Congress and disapproved by the President of the U
Gov. Pickens, of South Carolina, which was read by the Secretary. It announces the commencement of hostilities, and says that no harm had thus far been done to the works of the Confederated army, but great damage had been done to Fort Sumter. Mr. Wise commented briefly upon the intelligence, closing with the expression of a hope that the "terrapin" (meaning the Union men) "would begin to crawl, now that the fire was applied to his back." The hour of half-past 10 having arrived, Mr. Southall was called to the Chair, and the Convention went into Committee of the whole, for the purpose of considering the report of the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Ambler, of Louisa, availed himself of an opportunity to respond to the courteous disclaimer of the gentleman from Augusta, (Mr. Baldwin.) He was satisfied with his explanation, and met it in the spirit which had prompted it. Mr. Whitfield, of Isle of Wight, also made a personal explanation. He continued his re
to such treaty." The amendment was advocated by Mr. Wise; and the vote was taken on his motion to strike out, and resulted — yeas 31, nays 78. Mr. Blow, of Norfolk city, moved to amend the second section by inserting in the 3rd line after the word "routes," the words "nor shall any foreign State be annexed;" which was subsequently changed, at the suggestion of Mr. borman, so as to read "nor shall any foreign State or country be annexed." Explained and advocated by Messrs. Blow and Dorman, and rejected — yeas 44, nays 67. The second section was then adopted, without amendment. The third section was then taken up: 2. Neither the Constitution, nor any amendment thereof shall be construed to give Congress power to legislate concerning involuntary servitude in any state or Territory wherein the same is acknowledged, or may exist, by the laws thereof; nor to therefore with, or abolish, the same in the District of Columbia without the consent of Maryland and Virginia
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