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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 30, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Calcutta (West Bengal, India) (search for this): article 9
and deserted. The cereals have not been sown, in most cases, for want of rain; in other cases for want of seed, the seed having been consumed for food, and the Banners refusing to advance, as there is no prospect of a remunerative return. The prospects for the future are as dark and gloomy, therefore, as the present distress is grievous. The people throughout the country have contributed liberally for the relief of the sufferers. Bombay has given one lac and thirty thousand rupees. Calcutta has given an equal sum. Aid from Madras is yet to be realized. What would such an amount of money do, even under the most favorable circumstances, to save three millions of people from perishing for lack of bread! There are three great asylums at Delhi, outside the city; One at the Knoodsea Bagh, the original relief house, which admits only the most aged, infirm, and feeblest objects of compassion, as well as the latest arrivals, who are committed to the civil surgeon for treatment.
Fort St. George (Tamil Nadu, India) (search for this): article 9
sown, in most cases, for want of rain; in other cases for want of seed, the seed having been consumed for food, and the Banners refusing to advance, as there is no prospect of a remunerative return. The prospects for the future are as dark and gloomy, therefore, as the present distress is grievous. The people throughout the country have contributed liberally for the relief of the sufferers. Bombay has given one lac and thirty thousand rupees. Calcutta has given an equal sum. Aid from Madras is yet to be realized. What would such an amount of money do, even under the most favorable circumstances, to save three millions of people from perishing for lack of bread! There are three great asylums at Delhi, outside the city; One at the Knoodsea Bagh, the original relief house, which admits only the most aged, infirm, and feeblest objects of compassion, as well as the latest arrivals, who are committed to the civil surgeon for treatment. In this there were some eight hundred. T
Delhi, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 9
prospects for the future are as dark and gloomy, therefore, as the present distress is grievous. The people throughout the country have contributed liberally for the relief of the sufferers. Bombay has given one lac and thirty thousand rupees. Calcutta has given an equal sum. Aid from Madras is yet to be realized. What would such an amount of money do, even under the most favorable circumstances, to save three millions of people from perishing for lack of bread! There are three great asylums at Delhi, outside the city; One at the Knoodsea Bagh, the original relief house, which admits only the most aged, infirm, and feeblest objects of compassion, as well as the latest arrivals, who are committed to the civil surgeon for treatment. In this there were some eight hundred. The second place is the great enclosure of the Eodgah, in which from six to eight thousand receive a meal a day. The third refuge is outside the Delhi Gate, where from three to four thousand assemble daily.
Bombay (Maharashtra, India) (search for this): article 9
re like the "garden of the Lord," are now uncultivated and deserted. The cereals have not been sown, in most cases, for want of rain; in other cases for want of seed, the seed having been consumed for food, and the Banners refusing to advance, as there is no prospect of a remunerative return. The prospects for the future are as dark and gloomy, therefore, as the present distress is grievous. The people throughout the country have contributed liberally for the relief of the sufferers. Bombay has given one lac and thirty thousand rupees. Calcutta has given an equal sum. Aid from Madras is yet to be realized. What would such an amount of money do, even under the most favorable circumstances, to save three millions of people from perishing for lack of bread! There are three great asylums at Delhi, outside the city; One at the Knoodsea Bagh, the original relief house, which admits only the most aged, infirm, and feeblest objects of compassion, as well as the latest arrivals,