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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: may 6, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Madison (Texas, United States) (search for this): article 1
oubt the Military Committee will give to the bill all the attention it merits, and most certainly they will report it back to Congress. Mr. T. R. R. Cobb, of Georgia, presented a memorial from a very worthy clergyman as to the propriety and necessity of appointing chaplains for the Army. The memorial, without being read, was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Ochiltree, of Texas, offered a memorial from citizens of Texas, on the necessity of establishing an armory in Madison county, in Texas. The memorial, without being read, was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Khett, of South Carolina, then moved that Congress go into secret session. Adopted. P. S.--I hear of no news of general interest transpiring in the Departments. The news market is quiet. There is considerable chat here about Congress adjourning in a few weeks and removing their sessions to Richmond, Va. I will not be surprised to learn that all the Departments move also. The seat of our G
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
it back to Congress. Mr. T. R. R. Cobb, of Georgia, presented a memorial from a very worthy clergyman as to the propriety and necessity of appointing chaplains for the Army. The memorial, without being read, was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Ochiltree, of Texas, offered a memorial from citizens of Texas, on the necessity of establishing an armory in Madison county, in Texas. The memorial, without being read, was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Khett, of South Carolina, then moved that Congress go into secret session. Adopted. P. S.--I hear of no news of general interest transpiring in the Departments. The news market is quiet. There is considerable chat here about Congress adjourning in a few weeks and removing their sessions to Richmond, Va. I will not be surprised to learn that all the Departments move also. The seat of our Government is not fixed, and Congress can to-morrow change it from Montgomery to any other place. This city has
Memphis (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
Extra session of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States.Second day. Montgomery, Ala., April 30, 1861. Congress met to-day at noon. Opened by prayer, by the Rev. Mr. Mitchell. The Journals of yesterday were read and confirmed. The President stated that the first business in order was the call of States for resolutions, memorials, &c., &c. Mr. Chilton, of Ala., presented a communication he had received from Memphis, Tenn. and in his opinion contained important information, which he desired should be submitted to the Committee on Military Affairs. The communication, without being read, was accordingly referred. Mr. Wright, of Ga., said he did not rise to offer a resolution, or present a memorial, but simply for the purpose of making the inquiry from the chairman of the Military Committee as to what had been done with the bill introduced at the last session providing for the formation of a volunteer division in the regular Army of the Confede
Troup (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ginia. They compose the first battalion of the third Alabama regiment. Another battalion leaves tonight. Two mounted companies leave soon for Pensacola. The whole souled, God-like nobility recently exhibited by the Inferior Court of Troup county, Ga., and by the Mayor and Council of La Grange, Ga., meets warm approbation among all classes here. They are reported to have told the captains of the companies which left. Troup county to draw on them without limit for any sums to add to thea., and by the Mayor and Council of La Grange, Ga., meets warm approbation among all classes here. They are reported to have told the captains of the companies which left. Troup county to draw on them without limit for any sums to add to the comforts and conveniences of the soldiers who had left for the war. If every locality in the South would do the same, all our soldiers would move off with still more cheerful hearts, and they would feel and know that they had indeed good friends at home.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
Extra session of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States.Second day. Montgomery, Ala., April 30, 1861. Congress met to-day at noon. Opened by prayer, by the Rev. Mr. Mitchell. The Journals of yesterday were read and confirmed. The President stated that the first business in order was the call of Statmmittee as to what had been done with the bill introduced at the last session providing for the formation of a volunteer division in the regular Army of the Confederate States. The bill was referred to the Military Committee, but they have not made any report upon it. He said he regarded the bill as an important one, and desired t there was no disposition on the part of the Military Committee to stifle the bill alluded to. The bills for the organization of the military forces of the Confederate States have all been passed, and he did not consider the bill for the organization of a volunteer division at present of such importance as to demand the immediate
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
rred to the Military Committee, but they have not made any report upon it. He said he regarded the bill as an important one, and desired to know whether or not that committee intended to report on it; and if so, at what time. Mr. Bartow, of Georgia, chairman of the Military Committee, said the bill to which his colleague (Mr. Wright) alludes was referred to the Military Committee, and his impression was that he had been instructed to report unfavorable to its passage. On this point, howevch importance as to demand the immediate attention of the committee. There is no doubt the Military Committee will give to the bill all the attention it merits, and most certainly they will report it back to Congress. Mr. T. R. R. Cobb, of Georgia, presented a memorial from a very worthy clergyman as to the propriety and necessity of appointing chaplains for the Army. The memorial, without being read, was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Ochiltree, of Texas, offered a memoria
hey will report it back to Congress. Mr. T. R. R. Cobb, of Georgia, presented a memorial from a very worthy clergyman as to the propriety and necessity of appointing chaplains for the Army. The memorial, without being read, was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Ochiltree, of Texas, offered a memorial from citizens of Texas, on the necessity of establishing an armory in Madison county, in Texas. The memorial, without being read, was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Khett, of South Carolina, then moved that Congress go into secret session. Adopted. P. S.--I hear of no news of general interest transpiring in the Departments. The news market is quiet. There is considerable chat here about Congress adjourning in a few weeks and removing their sessions to Richmond, Va. I will not be surprised to learn that all the Departments move also. The seat of our Government is not fixed, and Congress can to-morrow change it from Montgomery to any other place.
W. R. Ochiltree (search for this): article 1
volunteer division at present of such importance as to demand the immediate attention of the committee. There is no doubt the Military Committee will give to the bill all the attention it merits, and most certainly they will report it back to Congress. Mr. T. R. R. Cobb, of Georgia, presented a memorial from a very worthy clergyman as to the propriety and necessity of appointing chaplains for the Army. The memorial, without being read, was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Ochiltree, of Texas, offered a memorial from citizens of Texas, on the necessity of establishing an armory in Madison county, in Texas. The memorial, without being read, was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Khett, of South Carolina, then moved that Congress go into secret session. Adopted. P. S.--I hear of no news of general interest transpiring in the Departments. The news market is quiet. There is considerable chat here about Congress adjourning in a few weeks and removing
Extra session of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States.Second day. Montgomery, Ala., April 30, 1861. Congress met to-day at noon. Opened by prayer, by the Rev. Mr. Mitchell. The Journals of yesterday were read and confirmed. The President stated that the first business in order was the call of States for resolutions, memorials, &c., &c. Mr. Chilton, of Ala., presented a communication he had received from Memphis, Tenn. and in his opinion contained important information, which he desired should be submitted to the Committee on Military Affairs. The communication, without being read, was accordingly referred. Mr. Wright, of Ga., said he did not rise to offer a resolution, or present a memorial, but simply for the purpose of making the inquiry from the chairman of the Military Committee as to what had been done with the bill introduced at the last session providing for the formation of a volunteer division in the regular Army of the Confed
bill was referred to the Military Committee, but they have not made any report upon it. He said he regarded the bill as an important one, and desired to know whether or not that committee intended to report on it; and if so, at what time. Mr. Bartow, of Georgia, chairman of the Military Committee, said the bill to which his colleague (Mr. Wright) alludes was referred to the Military Committee, and his impression was that he had been instructed to report unfavorable to its passage. On thisgarded the bill an important one. If the committee will report at an early day, I will be satisfied to wait; but, if otherwise, I shall try to get the bill before Congress in some other way than through a report of the Military Committee. Mr. Bartow assured the gentleman (Mr. Wright) that there was no disposition on the part of the Military Committee to stifle the bill alluded to. The bills for the organization of the military forces of the Confederate States have all been passed, and he d
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