hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 30 0 Browse Search
Lincoln 22 4 Browse Search
Robert G. Scott 20 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Carlile 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Templar 14 0 Browse Search
James C. Johnson 14 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: may 11, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 5 total hits in 3 results.

Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 13
The negro-stealing at Key West. --From an official repot, it appears that Capt. Meigs, of the U. S. Army, has been acquitted by President Lincoln of the complaints which followed him from Key West, on his return from reinforcing the fortifications in the Gulf, in relation to carrying slaves hired to work at Key West to Pensacola and Fort Pickens, and there employing them. It is contended that the contract has not been in reality violated — though it was — and that "it is not to be presumed that the slaves will be compelled to become combatants at all, except in a case where military necessity would justify making any persons found in the fort become combatants
The negro-stealing at Key West. --From an official repot, it appears that Capt. Meigs, of the U. S. Army, has been acquitted by President Lincoln of the complaints which followed him from Key West, on his return from reinforcing the fortifications in the Gulf, in relation to carrying slaves hired to work at Key West to Pensacola and Fort Pickens, and there employing them. It is contended that the contract has not been in reality violated — though it was — and that "it is not to be presumed that the slaves will be compelled to become combatants at all, except in a case where military necessity would justify making any persons found in the fort become combatants
The negro-stealing at Key West. --From an official repot, it appears that Capt. Meigs, of the U. S. Army, has been acquitted by President Lincoln of the complaints which followed him from Key West, on his return from reinforcing the fortifications in the Gulf, in relation to carrying slaves hired to work at Key West to Pensacola and Fort Pickens, and there employing them. It is contended that the contract has not been in reality violated — though it was — and that "it is not to be presumed that the slaves will be compelled to become combatants at all, except in a case where military necessity would justify making any persons found in the fort become combatants