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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 15, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 889 total hits in 424 results.

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From Sagua la Grande. Baltimore,May 14.--An arrival from Sagua la Grande brings advices to the 2d inst.--Freights on sugar and molasses $4 per hogshead. Foreign vessels in demand for best freights.
Death of well-known citizens. --Among those who have passed away from life recently, who were known to citizens of both the present and a past generation, may be mentioned Mr. Seymour P. Vial, long a resident of this city, who deceased Saturday, at the ripe age of 74 years. In this connection may be also embraced the name of Parrott A. Prindle, well known in this city, and who may also with justice have been considered a resident of Richmond. He died in Charlottesville, on Friday, the 3d instant, while on his way from his residence in Washington City to the Greenbrier White Sulphur Springs, aged 57 years and 4 months. His remains were conveyed to Washington, D. C. and interred on the 5th instant. William A. Jones, a native of this city, aged 31 years, died of consumption on Monday last. His remains were interred in Hollywood Cemetery yesterday evening, beside those of his family.
Death of well-known citizens. --Among those who have passed away from life recently, who were known to citizens of both the present and a past generation, may be mentioned Mr. Seymour P. Vial, long a resident of this city, who deceased Saturday, at the ripe age of 74 years. In this connection may be also embraced the name of Parrott A. Prindle, well known in this city, and who may also with justice have been considered a resident of Richmond. He died in Charlottesville, on Friday, the 3d instant, while on his way from his residence in Washington City to the Greenbrier White Sulphur Springs, aged 57 years and 4 months. His remains were conveyed to Washington, D. C. and interred on the 5th instant. William A. Jones, a native of this city, aged 31 years, died of consumption on Monday last. His remains were interred in Hollywood Cemetery yesterday evening, beside those of his family.
The Blue Hen's Chickens. In the Jersey City Standard, of the 9th instant, we find a number of letters from the volunteers in Lincoln's army, stationed at Washington. We make a few choice extracts, which present a mournful contrast to the brag and bluster of the politicians who have deluded these poor soldiers into the belief that they were setting out upon a campaign of glory and conquest. One honest lad thus describes the first sensations of misery: "Sunday night I first began to realize what a life it is I have commenced. Everything was miserable." There were nearly one thousand of us crowded on one boat, with scarce hall room enough to lie down even, let alone to walk about. At nine o'clock the drum beat for us to go to our 'bunks.' In the hold berths had been put up of rough boards, but even they would only accommodate half our number. The rest had to wrap themselves in their blankets and sleep on deck. I did the latter, as the hold was so close I feared I co
The redoubtable Gen. Butler. The following scathing resume of the Massachusetts General's exploits in Maryland, is from the Baltimore Exchange, of the 10th instant: The greenest laurels that have been gathered in this war have been plucked by General Benjamin F. Butler, of Massachusetts.--The earliest chieftain in the field, he has reaped the fruits of his diligence and courage by achieving the first success of the campaign. He has ennobled the name of Butler and of Benjamin also, and has added lustre to the initial F. His glory shall not wholly fade away; for though his grateful country should fail to reward him with a collectorship or foreign mission, posterity will be mindful of his services, and history will record his deeds and perpetuate his fame. On Saturday last, as our readers will remember, General Butler assaulted and carried the heights surrounding the Relay House. By a forced march in a railway train with twenty-four hundred men, he reached the ground, and a
Confederate Congress. --The following is a summary of proceedings on the 11th inst.: Mr. Ochiltree, of Texas, introduced a resolution instructing the Committee on Indian Affairs to report on the propriety of the Confederacy taking charge of and providing for the Indians upon the reserves in Texas. Mr. Brooke, of Mississippi, reported a bill establishing a Patent Office. Congress then went into secret session. Subsequently secrecy was removed from a Message of the President communicating to Congress a copy of a letter from Hon. John A. Campbell, formerly Judge of the Supreme Court of the United States, which he addressed to Wm. H. Seward, pending the negotiations with the Southern Commissioners at Washington. Judge Campbell acted as a voluntary mediator between the two Governments, for the purpose of preventing a collision, and he charged Seward with duplicity during the whole correspondence. Another Message from the President recognizes Hon. Thomas L. C
ceived that enlistments for the increase of the personnel of the Navy are so successful that the necessary number will soon be supplied. The Secretary of the Navy is assiduous in hurrying forward the measures of the blockade, and informs his friends that by this time Charleston and the Savannah river experience its effects. The steamer Niagara and other vessels will similarly operate at New Orleans. Speaking of the commerce of the Mississippi, the Memphis Bulletin of the 12th instant says: The blockade at Cairo will operate in more ways than one. The ostensible object is to prevent the export of provisions and munitions of war from the Northwestern to the Southwestern States. But it will be equally effective in preventing the exports from the latter in return. So far as we know and believe, the supply of provisions in the South is abundant, and was never more so at this season of the year. Certain we are, from the most reliable information, that there is food
California News. --The California express arrived at Fort Kearney on the 12th, with San Francisco advices to May 1st. The steamer Golden Age had sailed with $488,000 in treasure, one-fourth of which goes to England. There was great excitement in consequence of the war news. Advices of the secession of Virginia had been received, and of the Baltimore riot. Also, a report that Jeff. Davis was marching on Washington. The fear of the privateers of the Southern States had diminished the shipment of treasure. The Union spirit was aroused in all sections of the State, and sympathizers with secession were very quiet. A secession flag erected over the U. S. Marshal's office had been hauled down. The House of Delegates had passed a bill for the election of members Congress on the 20th. The Senate would probably concur. The Douglas men go for the Union, thus rendering fusion with the Breckinridge party impracticable. The troubles in Santa Clara county continue.
California News. --The California express arrived at Fort Kearney on the 12th, with San Francisco advices to May 1st. The steamer Golden Age had sailed with $488,000 in treasure, one-fourth of which goes to England. There was great excitement in consequence of the war news. Advices of the secession of Virginia had been received, and of the Baltimore riot. Also, a report that Jeff. Davis was marching on Washington. The fear of the privateers of the Southern States had diminished the shipment of treasure. The Union spirit was aroused in all sections of the State, and sympathizers with secession were very quiet. A secession flag erected over the U. S. Marshal's office had been hauled down. The House of Delegates had passed a bill for the election of members Congress on the 20th. The Senate would probably concur. The Douglas men go for the Union, thus rendering fusion with the Breckinridge party impracticable. The troubles in Santa Clara county continue.
day of Voting the 23rd of may Next to the duty of defending the sell of Virginia against the desecrating footsteps of invasion, is the duty of Voting on the Secession Ordinance, which is submitted to the people for their ratification on the 23d inst. We beg our brethren of the press everywhere throughout Virginia to call the attention of the people to this most important subject. Otherwise, there is great reason to apprehend that, amidst the excitement and confusion of military preparationession as a fixed fast, may fail to vote for the Ordinance. It is all important that there should be a full vote on this occasion, even if we pull a trigger with one hand and deposit our ballots with the other. It is important, also, in order to prevent mistakes and confusion, that proper tickets should be prepared. This matter ought at once to be attended to. Remember, Thursday, the 23d, is the day of voting, and that soldiers of Virginia, wherever they may be, are permitted to vote.
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