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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: may 15, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 4
The redoubtable Gen. Butler. The following scathing resume of the Massachusetts General's exploits in Maryland, is from the Baltimore Exchange, of the 10th instant: The greenest laurels that have been gathered in this war have been plucked by General Benjamin F. Butler, of Massachusetts.--The earliest chieftain in the field, he has reaped the fruits of his diligence and courage by achieving the first success of the campaign. He has ennobled the name of Butler and of Benjamin also, aere at best. They have occupied our territory without authority under the laws or the Constitution. They are temporarily holding this State in subjection. All this is enough for us to bear patiently. Let him, then, be careful how he fulminates any more brutal threats from the camp which is intended to overawe us; for, just so sure as he tifles-with us, just as surely will he rue it. When the blood of Maryland is up all the militiamen in Massachusetts cannot hold her soil against her sons.
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 4
owing scathing resume of the Massachusetts General's exploits in Maryland, is from the Baltimore Exchange, of the 10th instant: The greenest laurels that have been gathered in this war have been plucked by General Benjamin F. Butler, of Massachusetts.--The earliest chieftain in the field, he has reaped the fruits of his diligence and courage by achieving the first success of the campaign. He has ennobled the name of Butler and of Benjamin also, and has added lustre to the initial F. His re at best. They have occupied our territory without authority under the laws or the Constitution. They are temporarily holding this State in subjection. All this is enough for us to bear patiently. Let him, then, be careful how he fulminates any more brutal threats from the camp which is intended to overawe us; for, just so sure as he tifles-with us, just as surely will he rue it. When the blood of Maryland is up all the militiamen in Massachusetts cannot hold her soil against her sons.
bly planned, and so successfully executed, would, under any circumstances, redound to the honor of the officer who commanded it; but we of Baltimore, who know the peculiar difficulties and perils which General Butler overcame, are alone able to do him full justice. We can understand the triumphant joy that filled his breast as he penned the "special brigade order" which we published yesterday. We can comprehend the exultation with which he congratulated his troops upon the capture of "one Spencer," and thanked the two officers who performed that feat for the "coolness, promptitude and zeal" which they displayed. We can appreciate the pride with which he referred to the private who was killed by his own ramrod, as "a heroic, conscientious soldier, who died in the act of discharging his duty." We acknowledge, also, the eminent propriety of the rhetorical style which the General has adopted in this instance. A profusion of fine words, and an exaggeration of plain facts, are not only
heroic, conscientious soldier, who died in the act of discharging his duty." We acknowledge, also, the eminent propriety of the rhetorical style which the General has adopted in this instance. A profusion of fine words, and an exaggeration of plain facts, are not only necessary on such occasions as the present, but they are natural to some great men, and we, of course, judge General Butler as he stands upon the heights commanding Elk Ridge Landing, by the same rules that we would apply to Napoleon who had gained the summits of the Alps. But there is one part of General Butler's order which we cannot afford to pass over without an expression of strong disapprobation and disgust, both because it contains a statement which we believe to be utterly untrue, and a suggestion or threat which we feel called upon to pronounce cowardly and atrocious. It is charged in this order that one of the soldiers "has been poisoned by means of strychnine administered in the food brought into the camp"
The redoubtable Gen. Butler. The following scathing resume of the Massachusetts General's exploits in Maryland, is from the Baltimore Exchange, of the 10th instant: The greenest laurels that have been gathered in this war have been plucked by General Benjamin F. Butler, of Massachusetts.--The earliest chieftain in the field, he has reaped the fruits of his diligence and courage by achieving the first success of the campaign. He has ennobled the name of Butler and of Benjamin also, and has added lustre to the initial F. His glory shall not wholly fade away; for though his grateful country should fail to reward him with a collectorship or foreign mission, posterity will be mindful of his services, and history will record his deeds and perpetuate his fame. On Saturday last, as our readers will remember, General Butler assaulted and carried the heights surrounding the Relay House. By a forced march in a railway train with twenty-four hundred men, he reached the ground, and a
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): article 4
The redoubtable Gen. Butler. The following scathing resume of the Massachusetts General's expred in this war have been plucked by General Benjamin F. Butler, of Massachusetts.--The earliest chi of the campaign. He has ennobled the name of Butler and of Benjamin also, and has added lustre to turday last, as our readers will remember, General Butler assaulted and carried the heights surroundthe peculiar difficulties and perils which General Butler overcame, are alone able to do him full jul to some great men, and we, of course, judge General Butler as he stands upon the heights commandinits of the Alps. But there is one part of General Butler's order which we cannot afford to pass oveom four or five to the number mentioned by General Butler, and all who have undertaken to investigatbt. But so far from pursuing this course, General Butler seems to have caught at the opportunity to are, consequently, likely to assume. Let General Butler undeceive himself in this matter, and that
The redoubtable Gen. Butler. The following scathing resume of the Massachusetts General's exploits in Maryland, is from the Baltimore Exchange, of the 10th instant: The greenest laurels that have been gathered in this war have been plucked by General Benjamin F. Butler, of Massachusetts.--The earliest chieftain in the field, he has reaped the fruits of his diligence and courage by achieving the first success of the campaign. He has ennobled the name of Butler and of Benjamin also, and has added lustre to the initial F. His glory shall not wholly fade away; for though his grateful country should fail to reward him with a collectorship or foreign mission, posterity will be mindful of his services, and history will record his deeds and perpetuate his fame. On Saturday last, as our readers will remember, General Butler assaulted and carried the heights surrounding the Relay House. By a forced march in a railway train with twenty-four hundred men, he reached the ground, and a