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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 30, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Alleged negro Thief arrested and brought to Virginia. --W. M. Brown, Marshal of Nashville, Tennessee, arrived in Richmond last night, having in custody a young white man named James O. Davis, a native of Louise county, in this State, who is charged with having run off two negro slaves, the property of Mrs. Susannah Mills, wife of Andrew O. Mills some time in March last, and selling the same in Memphis, Tennessee. The prisoner was deposited in the cage last night for safe keeping. When he was first arrested in Tennessee, the Marshal started with him for Virginia without ironing him. Davis gave him the slip, and fled to Tallahatchie county, Mississippi, where he was discovered and re-arrested. He was surrendered on the requisition of Governor Letcher. The Marshal was accompanied thither by W. B. Marshall, Captain of one of the Mississippi volunteer companies. The prisoner, Davis, is represented to be a cute fellow, "up to snuff" generally, and in swindling particularly.
April 15th (search for this): article 4
Affairs in New Granada.Bogota not yet taken — expected descent on the Isthmus — great excitement among the people. The Panama correspondent of the New York Herald, dated May 15, says: All regular mail communication with Bogota being still suspended, the only intelligence received from there and the seat of war is through private sources. The latest advices from the Capital are to the 15th of April, brought by Mr. James E. Chambers, bearer of dispatches from General Jones, resident Minister of the United States near the Government of the Grenadian Confederation. The general aspect of affairs is about the same as at last reports Gen. Mosquera had not marched on Bogota on the 17th of April. On that day Mr. Chambers, accompanied by Gen. Jones, visited his headquarters, which were established at Villeta within two days march of the Capital, for the purpose of getting his passport vised. He represents Mosquera's force to be quite large and enthusiastic, while the Government for
April 17th (search for this): article 4
ular mail communication with Bogota being still suspended, the only intelligence received from there and the seat of war is through private sources. The latest advices from the Capital are to the 15th of April, brought by Mr. James E. Chambers, bearer of dispatches from General Jones, resident Minister of the United States near the Government of the Grenadian Confederation. The general aspect of affairs is about the same as at last reports Gen. Mosquera had not marched on Bogota on the 17th of April. On that day Mr. Chambers, accompanied by Gen. Jones, visited his headquarters, which were established at Villeta within two days march of the Capital, for the purpose of getting his passport vised. He represents Mosquera's force to be quite large and enthusiastic, while the Government force at Bogota, he says, is composed principally of persons who were pressed into the service against their wishes, from which he infers that Mosquera will achieve an easy victory. Other accounts, however
April 18th (search for this): article 1
Runaway in Jail. --Was committed to the Jail of the county of Hanover, on the 18th day of April last, a negro man, calling himself John Ford, as a runaway, but who claims to be a free man. The said negro is a bright mulatto, and is about five feet eight or nine inches high and is about twenty-three years old; has long black curly hair, and no scare of note. The said negro had on when committed a grey woolen suit coal lined with striped licsey. The owner of said negro is requested to come forward prove property, pay charges and take him away, else he will be dealt with as the law directs. C. S. Chisholme, acting Jailer my 27--2aw6w Of Hanover County, Va.
April 19th (search for this): article 4
ther accounts, however, state that the citizens of Bogota are united in their opposition to the revolutionists, and have resolved to defend the city. Mosquera had declared his intention to take up his line of march towards the capital on the 19th of April, having become satisfied that the city would not surrender, as he had vainly hoped. The Government troops are commanded by brave and skilful generals, and Mosquera, before he captures it, will meet with a desperate and determined resistance. ainst any privateers that may have been sent in these waters under orders from the revolted States of the United States. The United States sloop Cyane will probably cruise between San Francisco and Acapulco for the same purpose. On the 19th of April General Mosquera started for Chipaquira, to reinforce Colonel Santos Gutierres, who was fearing an attack from General Paris, as he had been sent from Bogota to meet him, soon after the defeat of Canas in Tunja. Lino Pena, who at the same ti
Affairs in New Granada.Bogota not yet taken — expected descent on the Isthmus — great excitement among the people. The Panama correspondent of the New York Herald, dated May 15, says: All regular mail communication with Bogota being still suspended, the only intelligence received from there and the seat of war is through private sources. The latest advices from the Capital are to the 15th of April, brought by Mr. James E. Chambers, bearer of dispatches from General Jones, resident Minister of the United States near the Government of the Grenadian Confederation. The general aspect of affairs is about the same as at last reports Gen. Mosquera had not marched on Bogota on the 17th of April. On that day Mr. Chambers, accompanied by Gen. Jones, visited his headquarters, which were established at Villeta within two days march of the Capital, for the purpose of getting his passport vised. He represents Mosquera's force to be quite large and enthusiastic, while the Government fo
A Shooting affair. --We learn from Capt. M. P. Dent, of the steamer Dew Drop, that a difficulty occurred at Felix Stewart's place on Yazoo river last Monday, between two men by the name of Collier and Brown, in which the latter was stabbed with a knife and killed by the former. A third party by the name of Moore, ordered Collier to give himself up, but refusing, he was shot in the breast with a load of buckshot, which not proving fatal, he was shot in the head with a rifle ball. This did not prove fatal, but he will hardly recover, as his face and head were dreadfully lacerated.--Vicksburg Whig, May 17.
Regiment, stationed on the southern slope of the Heights, seized a train of cars this afternoon, containing some three hundred passengers, a portion of whom are retained as prisoners. It is difficult to learn the particulars of the seizure of the train, and the disposition of the passengers and prisoners, inasmuch as the military authorities here refuse all passes to civilians to cross over to Virginia. This rule is applied to the members of the press with peculiar severity. Boston, May 23.--The Legislature was prorogued this afternoon by the Governor. There were fifteen bills and two resolves passed during the session, all of which had reference to the present condition of the State and country. Many of the members donated their pay to the Massachusetts Volunteer Fund, and the session closed by the members singing the "Star Spangled Banner," and other patriotic songs. The People's Convention at Dedham to-day unanimously nominated B. F. Thomas as successor to Mr. Ad
From Kentucky. Louisville May 23. --Neither Harney nor Prentice, who had been summoned to Frankfort to give evidence before a Committee of the Kentucky House of Representatives, relative to the introduction of arms into the State, went there. The Senate bill gratifies the States-Rights men. The Governor is included in the Commissioners. The bill provides for Home Guards. The Legislature will adjourn to-morrow at 12 o'clock. Some incidental appropriations were passed unanimously. Major Breckinridge was within the bar of the House, surrounded by many friends. The Governor has not yet signed the Stay Law bill.
Visit of Edwin Forrest to Alexandria. --A Washington dispatch, dated May 23, says: Edwin Forrest, of Philadelphia, and Simon H. Mix, of New York, set out together for Virginia to-day, to make reconnaissance, and witness the election proceedings in Alexandria. They took a carriage early in the morning, and proceeded direct by Long Bridge, returning late in the afternoon. No molestation was met with, but they were suspiciously scrutinized by secession troops on their journey. They passed through most of the streets of the city in search of the polls, but no places of voting were discovered. Going down on the wharf opposite which the United States steamer Pawnee is anchored, overlooking the town, which they found guarded by a Virginia militia man with a fowling piece, Mix inquired of the chivalric son of Mars, "Can you give me the name of that vessel in the steam, yonder?" "Sir," replied the man with the fowling piece.--"What wharf is this we are on?" gruffly responded th
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