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by shouts and yells down the street. I rushed forth, expecting to hear of a victory at the Ferry, but was doomed to disappointment, though repaid by greeting a company of fine-looking, gay young soldiers from New Market. They made this good town resound with their gaiety, leaving this morning, lustily cheering the young ladies of the Institute as they passed. The Hon. John T. Harris addressed them in a very fine and warlike speech. A fair friend of mine is desirous of devoting her services to her country as a nurse in the Confederate Army. Will you be kind enough to say to whom she must offer her services? Is there no philanthropic Southern women to place herself at the head of such a department? The weather is exceedingly cool to-day. Mr. Rhoer, whom I spoke of in my last, has since died. Blakemore, the man who killed him, was not brought to jail, as I stated. He made his escape, and is supposed to have gone North, a fitter place for such characters. De Leon.
From Harrisonburg.[Special Correspondence of the Dispatch] Harrisonburg, May 30, 1861. Our town, beginning to have much the appearance of stagnation, was aroused yesterday to its importance by the presence of armed men traversing its thoroughfares. Two companies of cavalry left here yesterday morning for parts unknown. Mr. De Niel addressed them, but your correspondent did not have the pleasure of hearing him. Enjoying the beauties of a sunset last eve, I was aroused from my reverie by shouts and yells down the street. I rushed forth, expecting to hear of a victory at the Ferry, but was doomed to disappointment, though repaid by greeting a company of fine-looking, gay young soldiers from New Market. They made this good town resound with their gaiety, leaving this morning, lustily cheering the young ladies of the Institute as they passed. The Hon. John T. Harris addressed them in a very fine and warlike speech. A fair friend of mine is desirous of devoting her
Blakemore (search for this): article 2
by shouts and yells down the street. I rushed forth, expecting to hear of a victory at the Ferry, but was doomed to disappointment, though repaid by greeting a company of fine-looking, gay young soldiers from New Market. They made this good town resound with their gaiety, leaving this morning, lustily cheering the young ladies of the Institute as they passed. The Hon. John T. Harris addressed them in a very fine and warlike speech. A fair friend of mine is desirous of devoting her services to her country as a nurse in the Confederate Army. Will you be kind enough to say to whom she must offer her services? Is there no philanthropic Southern women to place herself at the head of such a department? The weather is exceedingly cool to-day. Mr. Rhoer, whom I spoke of in my last, has since died. Blakemore, the man who killed him, was not brought to jail, as I stated. He made his escape, and is supposed to have gone North, a fitter place for such characters. De Leon.
John T. Harris (search for this): article 2
t did not have the pleasure of hearing him. Enjoying the beauties of a sunset last eve, I was aroused from my reverie by shouts and yells down the street. I rushed forth, expecting to hear of a victory at the Ferry, but was doomed to disappointment, though repaid by greeting a company of fine-looking, gay young soldiers from New Market. They made this good town resound with their gaiety, leaving this morning, lustily cheering the young ladies of the Institute as they passed. The Hon. John T. Harris addressed them in a very fine and warlike speech. A fair friend of mine is desirous of devoting her services to her country as a nurse in the Confederate Army. Will you be kind enough to say to whom she must offer her services? Is there no philanthropic Southern women to place herself at the head of such a department? The weather is exceedingly cool to-day. Mr. Rhoer, whom I spoke of in my last, has since died. Blakemore, the man who killed him, was not brought to jail
by shouts and yells down the street. I rushed forth, expecting to hear of a victory at the Ferry, but was doomed to disappointment, though repaid by greeting a company of fine-looking, gay young soldiers from New Market. They made this good town resound with their gaiety, leaving this morning, lustily cheering the young ladies of the Institute as they passed. The Hon. John T. Harris addressed them in a very fine and warlike speech. A fair friend of mine is desirous of devoting her services to her country as a nurse in the Confederate Army. Will you be kind enough to say to whom she must offer her services? Is there no philanthropic Southern women to place herself at the head of such a department? The weather is exceedingly cool to-day. Mr. Rhoer, whom I spoke of in my last, has since died. Blakemore, the man who killed him, was not brought to jail, as I stated. He made his escape, and is supposed to have gone North, a fitter place for such characters. De Leon.
May 30th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 2
From Harrisonburg.[Special Correspondence of the Dispatch] Harrisonburg, May 30, 1861. Our town, beginning to have much the appearance of stagnation, was aroused yesterday to its importance by the presence of armed men traversing its thoroughfares. Two companies of cavalry left here yesterday morning for parts unknown. Mr. De Niel addressed them, but your correspondent did not have the pleasure of hearing him. Enjoying the beauties of a sunset last eve, I was aroused from my reverie by shouts and yells down the street. I rushed forth, expecting to hear of a victory at the Ferry, but was doomed to disappointment, though repaid by greeting a company of fine-looking, gay young soldiers from New Market. They made this good town resound with their gaiety, leaving this morning, lustily cheering the young ladies of the Institute as they passed. The Hon. John T. Harris addressed them in a very fine and warlike speech. A fair friend of mine is desirous of devoting her