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Howard's Grove (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): article 5
of the camp is the color of the freestone strata through which it flows. Of this mineral there seems to be an inexhaustible quantity, the entire soil partaking of its dull red color. There is something of a village here, consisting of one tavern, two stores and several private dwellings. Within the circuit of a mile or two are several handsome residences. There are numerous bodies of troops here, besides our regiment, among them Col.Kershaw's regiment, not long since encamped in Howard's Grove, near your city. What our force is, of course I will not say; but, few or many, their numbers and resolution are sufficient to give any force that the enemy can well spare from their boasted thousands a welcome with bloody hands to hospitable graves.--There is no sickness of consequence among our men, and all are in excellent spirits, and rapidly acquitting that degree of proficiency in drill necessary to fit them for the art of war. On Monday morning, about 10 o'clock, the intelli
Bull Creek (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 5
s to hide his fear; quietly and quickly falling into ranks, every man stood ready for the word of command, and within less than half an hour from the moment of the call to arms we were on our way to meet the foe. Our march could not have been more disagreeable. The deep dust that filled the road was hurled into our faces in blinding clouds by a high wind, blinding and almost suffocating us. But this was almost unheeded, and our columns pressed rapidly on. Arriving at a small stream called Bull Creek, distant about four miles from Manassas Junction, the command was given to halt, in order to allow us a few moments to get water. While there, we were met by a portion of the S. C. Regiment. They had preceded us several hours in anticipation of a fight and were then returning. From them we learned that the rumored killing of our scouts and the advance of the enemy were unfounded, everything being quiet ahead. Great was their disappointment and our own, and throwing themselves upon the
F. J. Boggs (search for this): article 5
s and the advance of the enemy were unfounded, everything being quiet ahead. Great was their disappointment and our own, and throwing themselves upon the grass under the protecting shade of the beautiful wood that bordered the pretty little stream, our men gave free expression to their regret that they were not yet to have a brush. Just at this time, Gen. Bonham, first in command here, came riding down the road from the direction opposite to that from which we had come. Our Captain, (Rev. F. J. Boggs, 2d Grays,) had had an inkling that the General would soon make his appearance, and, while the other companies of the regiment were laying about at ease, our Captain, in the pride of promptness, commendable in a soldier above all other men, quickly and quietly formed us into line, and as the General came to our front, our pieces were promptly brought to a "present." Immediately reining up his horse, he raised his hat in acknowledgment of our salute, and as the other companies came runni
d preceded us several hours in anticipation of a fight and were then returning. From them we learned that the rumored killing of our scouts and the advance of the enemy were unfounded, everything being quiet ahead. Great was their disappointment and our own, and throwing themselves upon the grass under the protecting shade of the beautiful wood that bordered the pretty little stream, our men gave free expression to their regret that they were not yet to have a brush. Just at this time, Gen. Bonham, first in command here, came riding down the road from the direction opposite to that from which we had come. Our Captain, (Rev. F. J. Boggs, 2d Grays,) had had an inkling that the General would soon make his appearance, and, while the other companies of the regiment were laying about at ease, our Captain, in the pride of promptness, commendable in a soldier above all other men, quickly and quietly formed us into line, and as the General came to our front, our pieces were promptly brough
e expression to their regret that they were not yet to have a brush. Just at this time, Gen. Bonham, first in command here, came riding down the road from the direction opposite to that from which we had come. Our Captain, (Rev. F. J. Boggs, 2d Grays,) had had an inkling that the General would soon make his appearance, and, while the other companies of the regiment were laying about at ease, our Captain, in the pride of promptness, commendable in a soldier above all other men, quickly and quin at this compliment as the General rode away towards camp, whither we soon followed him, and from which I hope to date a few more letters. A few words in conclusion, and, in those few words, an appeal. Of all the companies here, the Second Grays and Co."I" are without tents, and we are sleeping with no shelter from the weather but boughs, of which we have constructed rude huts. Should a heavy rain come, we should be in a sorry plight — ourselves chilled, and clothing thoroughly wet, and
t which we are able to get in the immediate vicinity of the camp is the color of the freestone strata through which it flows. Of this mineral there seems to be an inexhaustible quantity, the entire soil partaking of its dull red color. There is something of a village here, consisting of one tavern, two stores and several private dwellings. Within the circuit of a mile or two are several handsome residences. There are numerous bodies of troops here, besides our regiment, among them Col.Kershaw's regiment, not long since encamped in Howard's Grove, near your city. What our force is, of course I will not say; but, few or many, their numbers and resolution are sufficient to give any force that the enemy can well spare from their boasted thousands a welcome with bloody hands to hospitable graves.--There is no sickness of consequence among our men, and all are in excellent spirits, and rapidly acquitting that degree of proficiency in drill necessary to fit them for the art of war.
May 28th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 5
From Camp Pickens.[Special Correspondence of the Dispatch.] Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, May 28th, 1861. Camp duties have prevented my writing to you before this. Having now a few hours' leisure, I avail myself of the opportunity to give you some information of things transpiring here, knowing that your entire community are anxiously awaiting authentic intelligence from us. Leaving the Hermitage Fair Grounds on Saturday morning at 10 o'clock, we expected to make the trip to this place in the usual time, but did not arrive until Sunday at 2 o'clock P. M., the cause of our delay being the intelligence that a collision had taken place on the road a few hours previous, of which you were several days ago apprised, the authorities deeming it proper to stop at Gordousville until it could be ascertained that the way was clear, and everything in condition for our safe conveyance. If the hearts of our men needed inspiration, the tears of our wives, mothers, sisters, and whic