hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 86 0 Browse Search
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) 28 0 Browse Search
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) 26 0 Browse Search
France (France) 26 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Garrick 22 0 Browse Search
Cadwallader 18 12 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 14 0 Browse Search
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
California (California, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 8, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,240 total hits in 555 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
April 8th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 1
Runaway. --Sam, one of the convict slaves, employed in the erection of fortifications on Marion Hill, near Richmond, made his escape from the custody of the guards on Thursday evening, the 6th June, 1861, about sundown. He was received at the Penitentiary on the 8th day of April, 1861, from the county of Notteway, by the Court of which he was condemned to sale and transportation for an assault with intent to maim, &c. Said boy was at the time of his conviction the property of Joseph A. Bass, of said county of Nottoway; is 24 years of age, Dark color and about five feet high. The usual reward will be given for his apprehension and delivery at the Penitentiary. je 8--1t John C. Pryde.
May 5th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 16
t down to Fortress Monroe yesterday and returned in the evening. We learn through this medium that the U. S. steamer Harriet Lane was very badly injured in her brush with the fort at Pig Point. It has been ascertained that six of her men were sent to the hospital on her return to Fortress Monroe. The number of killed we could not learn. The steamer Alabama, from New York, arrived at Fortress Monroe yesterday, full of troops. The following official announcement of the brush at Pig Point on Wednesday, has been sent up by Capt. Pegram, of the Virginia Navy, who is in command of the fort: Pig Point Battery, 9 A. M., May 5th, 1861. Sir: We have just had a smart brush with the Harriet Lane and drove her off. I think several shot were put in her hull. The engagement lasted about twenty minutes. The H. L. commenced the engagement by firing an XI. inch shell. R. B. Pegram. Respectfully submitted by Commander Virginia Navy. To Flag-Officer F. Forrest.
May 30th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 9
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.crops in Alabama--anxious for a brush. Demopolis, Marengo Co., Ala., May 30th, 1861. Wheat, in this immediate neighborhood, is injured by rust, but the crops of oats, corn, cotton and upland rice, throughout the whole broad belt of this canebrake region, is very fine-- in fact, was never better at this time of year. Much more grain, in proportion to cotton, has been put in the ground this year than ever before. Some of our young men are at Harper's Ferry, and the Canebrake Legion, and several fine foot companies, are ready and waiting leave to go to Old Virginia's shores, or the shores of the Mississippi, or anywhere else, to get a brush at the Yankee vandals. Sic Semper Tyrannis. A. M. McD.
June 1st, 1861 AD (search for this): article 8
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.letter from Mississippi. Holly Spring, Marshall Co., Miss., June 1st, 1861. Say to the citizens of our old mother Virginia, not only the sons and true descendants of those noble patriots of Seventy-six, but the whole population of the sunny South, feel deeply the insult offered her, and the trespass committed on her sacred soil of liberty by that despotic tyrant and his Cabinet at Washington — marching their mercenary cohorts and taking possession of her soil. Every man and boy, from the age of fifteen to sixty years, are ready at a moment's call to rush to her rescue. This county, with a voting population of 2,400, have equipped and sent off ten companies to the tented field, and have ten more companies now organized and ready to march. Our whole population are in a military blaze. The old men of seventy and boys of ten years are drilling and organizing for the protection of firesides and home altars. Our ladies are organizing in
June 4th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 4
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.from Winchester. Winchester,Va., June 4, 1861. The "Dispatch" is anxiously sought for and read with much interest in this, our overanxious community, in these times, where Madam Rumor is rife on the all-absorbing questions which hourly originate on the movements of the indomitable sons of the South. The "Baltimore Sun" until lately had been much sought for; but, like the Upas tree, its deleterious effects in this community is rendering it obnoxious to its former many readers. On Thursday last a splendid troop of cavalry from Rockingham county, under the command of Captain Yancey, from McGaheysville, passed through town. Captain Yancey is the third brother who have command of volunteers from that county, one of whom is in command of another troop of horse, and the other of a company of light infantry. This morning ninety-six gallant and chivalrous looking volunteers from Luray, Page county, under the command of Capt. Young,
June 5th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 22
From Harper's Ferry.prospects for a fight — Accidents — seizure of U. S. Flag--Mrs. Johnsen, of Maryland.[special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Harpers' Ferry, Va., June 5, 1861. Judging from the display of soldiery in the Western part of this State, made up of Northern trash, we are not very far off from a fight, if Lincoln really means to repossess the property of the United States. The taking of Grafton by the United States troops, will become about as notorious probably as the celebrated capture of Greytown, by the U. S. forces, in which engagement one life was lost; but it turned out to be a monkey. So with Grafton. Northern journals make great boasts of taking the village, when there was none to dispute their entrance. The announced flight of Virginia forces is all gas, for there were none there to fly. Several hundred had been there, but had left several days before Northern troops came — as per the order of the General who sent them on a special mission. So m<
June 5th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 5
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.look out for spies. Fredericksburg, June 5th, 1861. Though I am not in the habit of writing for newspapers, I feel it my duty, as a Southern man, to make known, through you, some facts which you and others may think important. I am, you see, near our border, and hence have opportunity to see and hear much. I go to Aquia Creek two or three times a week, marking closely men and things. Yesterday morning I went over, as usual, and after arriving there, a fellow who came down in the same train with myself stepped up and inquired of me the number of men at the batteries, and several other questions of the same character. Discovering at once that he had a Northern tongue, I gave him such answers as I thought a Southern gentleman should give a Northern vandal, for such I at once regarded him. I soon discovered him and two others, out in the swamp near the point, pretending that they were looking for pieces of shell. I inquired of several
June 5th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 7
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.military spirit Increasing — the crops, &c. Amsterdam, June 5, 1861. I am glad to inform you that the military spirit of this county is on the increase, and still another company is nearly completed in this neighborhood. A very intelligent gentleman from Georgia informs me that he had lately an interview with Gov. Brown, who informed him that in all, nearly 100,000 men in that State had offered their services. The crops continued promising. The wheat harvest, now nearly done, was abundant, and the grain of fine quality. I have just seen a splendid body of cavalry in Lynchburg, under the command of Colonel Radford. They are receiving constant accessions, and will prove a formidable foe to the invader. Philo.
June 6th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 1
Runaway. --Sam, one of the convict slaves, employed in the erection of fortifications on Marion Hill, near Richmond, made his escape from the custody of the guards on Thursday evening, the 6th June, 1861, about sundown. He was received at the Penitentiary on the 8th day of April, 1861, from the county of Notteway, by the Court of which he was condemned to sale and transportation for an assault with intent to maim, &c. Said boy was at the time of his conviction the property of Joseph A. Bass, of said county of Nottoway; is 24 years of age, Dark color and about five feet high. The usual reward will be given for his apprehension and delivery at the Penitentiary. je 8--1t John C. Pryde.
June 6th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 10
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.an efficient Company — arrest of a Yankee. Orange Court-House, June 6, 1861. Capt. Browning's company of cavalry, the Orange Rangers, is now encamped here, ready to be mustered into service. It would be difficult to find a body of men of more physical power and endurance — of more will, determination and energy. They will take the field in a few days, and whatever men can do or suffer they will be found fully equal to. A suspicious character named Patrick Haley, was yesterday committed to our jail on failure to give bond and security for his good behavior, in the penalty of $500. He hails from Vermont. J.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...