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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 8, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 17 total hits in 11 results.

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Inundation of Chicot county, Ark. --Great Damage Done.--The Lake Village (Chicot county, Ark.,) Press, of the 23d ult., has the following: The high stage of the Mississippi has been a source of great alarm to our planters. The crops were in the most promising condition, and it was expected that Chicot would be able to meet the exigencies of war, but a new calamity--one quite unexpected — has fallen upon us. On Thursday, the 16th inst. the inexorable river cut its way through the narrow neck of land which separates it from Lake Chicot. Since that time the water in the lake has risen at the rate of two feet per diem, so that, as we write, it is within a few inches of the bank. We are cut off from all land communication, and many plantations on the river and lake are materially damaged. Some planters are engaged night and day in erecting levees, and the greatest anxiety is felt as to the issue of this irremediable disaster. Those who have most suffered on the lake
Inundation of Chicot county, Ark. --Great Damage Done.--The Lake Village (Chicot county, Ark.,) Press, of the 23d ult., has the following: The high stage of the Mississippi has been a source of great alarm to our planters. The crops were in the most promising condition, and it was expected that Chicot would be able to meet the exigencies of war, but a new calamity--one quite unexpected — has fallen upon us. On Thursday, the 16th inst. the inexorable river cut its way through the narrow neck of land which separates it from Lake Chicot. Since that time the water in the lake has risen at the rate of two feet per diem, so that, as we write, it is within a few inches of the bank. We are cut off from all land communication, and many plantations on the river and lake are materially damaged. Some planters are engaged night and day in erecting levees, and the greatest anxiety is felt as to the issue of this irremediable disaster. Those who have most suffered on the lake
Johnson Chapman (search for this): article 18
ot would be able to meet the exigencies of war, but a new calamity--one quite unexpected — has fallen upon us. On Thursday, the 16th inst. the inexorable river cut its way through the narrow neck of land which separates it from Lake Chicot. Since that time the water in the lake has risen at the rate of two feet per diem, so that, as we write, it is within a few inches of the bank. We are cut off from all land communication, and many plantations on the river and lake are materially damaged. Some planters are engaged night and day in erecting levees, and the greatest anxiety is felt as to the issue of this irremediable disaster. Those who have most suffered on the lake are: Judge A. H. Davies, Judge W. H. Sutton, E. S. Worthington, Mrs. G. Read, C. C. Stuart, and Johnson Chapman. We do not exaggerate in saying that these planters will suffer to the extent of $150,000. We learn that the river is rising rapidly, and that there is every probability of a general inundation.
A. H. Davies (search for this): article 18
cot would be able to meet the exigencies of war, but a new calamity--one quite unexpected — has fallen upon us. On Thursday, the 16th inst. the inexorable river cut its way through the narrow neck of land which separates it from Lake Chicot. Since that time the water in the lake has risen at the rate of two feet per diem, so that, as we write, it is within a few inches of the bank. We are cut off from all land communication, and many plantations on the river and lake are materially damaged. Some planters are engaged night and day in erecting levees, and the greatest anxiety is felt as to the issue of this irremediable disaster. Those who have most suffered on the lake are: Judge A. H. Davies, Judge W. H. Sutton, E. S. Worthington, Mrs. G. Read, C. C. Stuart, and Johnson Chapman. We do not exaggerate in saying that these planters will suffer to the extent of $150,000. We learn that the river is rising rapidly, and that there is every probability of a general inundation.
cot would be able to meet the exigencies of war, but a new calamity--one quite unexpected — has fallen upon us. On Thursday, the 16th inst. the inexorable river cut its way through the narrow neck of land which separates it from Lake Chicot. Since that time the water in the lake has risen at the rate of two feet per diem, so that, as we write, it is within a few inches of the bank. We are cut off from all land communication, and many plantations on the river and lake are materially damaged. Some planters are engaged night and day in erecting levees, and the greatest anxiety is felt as to the issue of this irremediable disaster. Those who have most suffered on the lake are: Judge A. H. Davies, Judge W. H. Sutton, E. S. Worthington, Mrs. G. Read, C. C. Stuart, and Johnson Chapman. We do not exaggerate in saying that these planters will suffer to the extent of $150,000. We learn that the river is rising rapidly, and that there is every probability of a general inundation.
C. C. Stuart (search for this): article 18
cot would be able to meet the exigencies of war, but a new calamity--one quite unexpected — has fallen upon us. On Thursday, the 16th inst. the inexorable river cut its way through the narrow neck of land which separates it from Lake Chicot. Since that time the water in the lake has risen at the rate of two feet per diem, so that, as we write, it is within a few inches of the bank. We are cut off from all land communication, and many plantations on the river and lake are materially damaged. Some planters are engaged night and day in erecting levees, and the greatest anxiety is felt as to the issue of this irremediable disaster. Those who have most suffered on the lake are: Judge A. H. Davies, Judge W. H. Sutton, E. S. Worthington, Mrs. G. Read, C. C. Stuart, and Johnson Chapman. We do not exaggerate in saying that these planters will suffer to the extent of $150,000. We learn that the river is rising rapidly, and that there is every probability of a general inundation.
W. H. Sutton (search for this): article 18
cot would be able to meet the exigencies of war, but a new calamity--one quite unexpected — has fallen upon us. On Thursday, the 16th inst. the inexorable river cut its way through the narrow neck of land which separates it from Lake Chicot. Since that time the water in the lake has risen at the rate of two feet per diem, so that, as we write, it is within a few inches of the bank. We are cut off from all land communication, and many plantations on the river and lake are materially damaged. Some planters are engaged night and day in erecting levees, and the greatest anxiety is felt as to the issue of this irremediable disaster. Those who have most suffered on the lake are: Judge A. H. Davies, Judge W. H. Sutton, E. S. Worthington, Mrs. G. Read, C. C. Stuart, and Johnson Chapman. We do not exaggerate in saying that these planters will suffer to the extent of $150,000. We learn that the river is rising rapidly, and that there is every probability of a general inundation.
Chicot (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 18
Inundation of Chicot county, Ark. --Great Damage Done.--The Lake Village (Chicot county, Ark.,) Press, of the 23d ult., has the following: The high stage of the Mississippi has been a source of great alarm to our planters. The crops were in the most promising condition, and it was expected that Chicot would be able to meet the exigencies of war, but a new calamity--one quite unexpected — has fallen upon us. On Thursday, the 16th inst. the inexorable river cut its way through the narrow neck of land which separates it from Lake Chicot. Since that time the water in the lake has risen at the rate of two feet per diem, so that, as we write, it is within a few inches of the bank. We are cut off from all land communication, and many plantations on the river and lake are materially damaged. Some planters are engaged night and day in erecting levees, and the greatest anxiety is felt as to the issue of this irremediable disaster. Those who have most suffered on the lak
Lake Village, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 18
Inundation of Chicot county, Ark. --Great Damage Done.--The Lake Village (Chicot county, Ark.,) Press, of the 23d ult., has the following: The high stage of the Mississippi has been a source of great alarm to our planters. The crops were in the most promising condition, and it was expected that Chicot would be able to meet the exigencies of war, but a new calamity--one quite unexpected — has fallen upon us. On Thursday, the 16th inst. the inexorable river cut its way through the narrow neck of land which separates it from Lake Chicot. Since that time the water in the lake has risen at the rate of two feet per diem, so that, as we write, it is within a few inches of the bank. We are cut off from all land communication, and many plantations on the river and lake are materially damaged. Some planters are engaged night and day in erecting levees, and the greatest anxiety is felt as to the issue of this irremediable disaster. Those who have most suffered on the lak
Lake Chicot (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 18
age Done.--The Lake Village (Chicot county, Ark.,) Press, of the 23d ult., has the following: The high stage of the Mississippi has been a source of great alarm to our planters. The crops were in the most promising condition, and it was expected that Chicot would be able to meet the exigencies of war, but a new calamity--one quite unexpected — has fallen upon us. On Thursday, the 16th inst. the inexorable river cut its way through the narrow neck of land which separates it from Lake Chicot. Since that time the water in the lake has risen at the rate of two feet per diem, so that, as we write, it is within a few inches of the bank. We are cut off from all land communication, and many plantations on the river and lake are materially damaged. Some planters are engaged night and day in erecting levees, and the greatest anxiety is felt as to the issue of this irremediable disaster. Those who have most suffered on the lake are: Judge A. H. Davies, Judge W. H. Sutton, E. S
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