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West Indies (search for this): article 10
o-morrow; the traitors will be cast out, and the Union firmer than ever — witness the happy results of the conquest of Ireland by England, repeated over and over again, and always repeated in vain. Having answered the questions which he supposes to be addressed to him by England, Mr. Clay becomes the questioner, and asks us where our honor would place us in this contest. Clearly by the side of the Union, because, he says, if slavery be extended in America, it must be restored in the West Indies.--If any one doubts the force of this demonstration, we are sorry for it, for Mr. Clay has no other to offer. Our examiner next asks us to consider our interests. Clearly, he says, it is to stand by the Union, because they are our best customers, and because, though they have done all they can, since the separation of the South gave them the power, to ruin their trade with us, they will, in spite of their own hostile tariff, remain our best customers. Lastly comes the momentous que
Russia (Russia) (search for this): article 10
cured the services of a jealous and earnest, if not a discreet champion, in the person of its newly-appointed Minister to Russia, the valiant Cassius M. Clay, of Kentucky. That gentleman lately arrived in England on his way to the field of his offictish public by thus thrusting his opinions in their faces, while simply halting for a day or a few days on his passage to Russia; and secondly, granting the propriety of place and occasion, that "British honor," "British interests," and the question f the Representatives of our country abroad. Had Mr. Clay been the Ambassador of the United States to England instead of Russia, it would have been manifestly improper thus to thrust great questions of the character discussed in his letter to the Times before the British people; and we cannot see how the case is materially changed by the fact that his mission is to Russia instead, unless it be to give to the transaction an air of impudence when otherwise it would have been one of impropriety.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 10
ith us, they will, in spite of their own hostile tariff, remain our best customers. Lastly comes the momentous question, "Can England afford to offend the United States? " "Certainly not," says Mr. Clay, "for in half a century they will amount to a hundred millions of people, and will have railways four thousand miles long. " and occasion, that "British honor," "British interests," and the question whether "England can afford to offend the great nation which will still be the 'United States of America,' even should we lose part of the South," are delicate subjects for an American diplomat to handle in the columns of an English newspaper, where no provocation or occasion has been given for such a departure from the usage of the Representatives of our country abroad. Had Mr. Clay been the Ambassador of the United States to England instead of Russia, it would have been manifestly improper thus to thrust great questions of the character discussed in his letter to the Times before t
Sunderland (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 10
a will soon become the centre of commerce and emigration for the American continent. Our compilation from the foreign files, given to-day, in such connection, is worthy of serious consideration, and exhibits a manifest tendency towards an unfriendly policy to the Government at Washington, which, if carried out, may result in giving England a severe lesson, for which she is probably not prepared. Mr. Lindsay, M. P., who recently visited this country, in a speech to his constituents at Sunderland, has gone far towards indoctrinating them with the idea of the right of secession at the South and the necessity of maintaining the rebel cause. This gentleman advises France and England to step forward and proclaim the independence of the Southern Confederacy as the only means of allaying the thirst for blood which he says prevails at the North. The London Morning Post, Lord Palmerston's organ, asserts that the Southern States were de facto independent at the moment. "Misplaced Co
France (France) (search for this): article 10
us consideration, and exhibits a manifest tendency towards an unfriendly policy to the Government at Washington, which, if carried out, may result in giving England a severe lesson, for which she is probably not prepared. Mr. Lindsay, M. P., who recently visited this country, in a speech to his constituents at Sunderland, has gone far towards indoctrinating them with the idea of the right of secession at the South and the necessity of maintaining the rebel cause. This gentleman advises France and England to step forward and proclaim the independence of the Southern Confederacy as the only means of allaying the thirst for blood which he says prevails at the North. The London Morning Post, Lord Palmerston's organ, asserts that the Southern States were de facto independent at the moment. "Misplaced Confidence." Under this heading the New York Express observes: It was a favorite notion with not a few of our contemporaries quite lately that, if the present British Mi
Canada (Canada) (search for this): article 10
views which he has so unwisely sought to thrust upon the people of England. "our Foreign Relations." The New York Herald, of Thursday, editorially says: Secretary Seward's dispatch to Mr. Dayton is again criticised in a very sneering manner by the London Times, and another English journal does not hesitate to class Mr. Lincoln's Cabinet and the insurgent Southern conclave of rebels as the two American factions. Lord Palmerston says, through his London organ, the Post, that Canada will soon become the centre of commerce and emigration for the American continent. Our compilation from the foreign files, given to-day, in such connection, is worthy of serious consideration, and exhibits a manifest tendency towards an unfriendly policy to the Government at Washington, which, if carried out, may result in giving England a severe lesson, for which she is probably not prepared. Mr. Lindsay, M. P., who recently visited this country, in a speech to his constituents at Sun
Palmerston (search for this): article 10
d be so infatuated as to espouse the cause of the Montgomery Confederacy, it would find its speedy account in ejection from office. The opposition led on by the Earl of Derby, it was never doubted, would be but too happy to avail themselves of Palmerston and Russell's leanings towards the Cotton Confederacy, to make them uncomfortable, at least, in their places, if not ultimately to compel her Majesty to seek other advisers. This expectation was not an unreasonable one. It was predicted upon ry, English sympathy must all be on the side of the North. --Never was there a greater delusion, as everybody may now see. The Earl of Derby, so far from espous- ing "the cause of freedom," and making that cause a lever with which to oust Palmerston and Russell from office, has taken the first opportunity to go a step or two in advance of them even, in favor of the Confederates! Witness his speech, on the 16th, in favor of treating privateers, not as pirates, but (we had almost said) as g
ated as to espouse the cause of the Montgomery Confederacy, it would find its speedy account in ejection from office. The opposition led on by the Earl of Derby, it was never doubted, would be but too happy to avail themselves of Palmerston and Russell's leanings towards the Cotton Confederacy, to make them uncomfortable, at least, in their places, if not ultimately to compel her Majesty to seek other advisers. This expectation was not an unreasonable one. It was predicted upon the fallacy tmpathy must all be on the side of the North. --Never was there a greater delusion, as everybody may now see. The Earl of Derby, so far from espous- ing "the cause of freedom," and making that cause a lever with which to oust Palmerston and Russell from office, has taken the first opportunity to go a step or two in advance of them even, in favor of the Confederates! Witness his speech, on the 16th, in favor of treating privateers, not as pirates, but (we had almost said) as gentlemen. Th
of our contemporaries quite lately that, if the present British Ministry would be so infatuated as to espouse the cause of the Montgomery Confederacy, it would find its speedy account in ejection from office. The opposition led on by the Earl of Derby, it was never doubted, would be but too happy to avail themselves of Palmerston and Russell's leanings towards the Cotton Confederacy, to make them uncomfortable, at least, in their places, if not ultimately to compel her Majesty to seek other advernment," the chief corner-stone of which, as acknowledged by Mr. Vice- President Stephens, is negro slavery, English sympathy must all be on the side of the North. --Never was there a greater delusion, as everybody may now see. The Earl of Derby, so far from espous- ing "the cause of freedom," and making that cause a lever with which to oust Palmerston and Russell from office, has taken the first opportunity to go a step or two in advance of them even, in favor of the Confederates! Wit
the vanity which sometimes characterizes the action of Americans in Europe; but the importance attached to his connection with the Administration, whose confidence in him has so recently been manifested by his selection for an important mission, will be likely to give undue prominence to the views which he has so unwisely sought to thrust upon the people of England. "our Foreign Relations." The New York Herald, of Thursday, editorially says: Secretary Seward's dispatch to Mr. Dayton is again criticised in a very sneering manner by the London Times, and another English journal does not hesitate to class Mr. Lincoln's Cabinet and the insurgent Southern conclave of rebels as the two American factions. Lord Palmerston says, through his London organ, the Post, that Canada will soon become the centre of commerce and emigration for the American continent. Our compilation from the foreign files, given to-day, in such connection, is worthy of serious consideration, and exhib
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