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Kentucky and Ohio. The sight of a company of hardy Kentuckians on the Capitol Square, last Wednesday evening, has elicited from the Richmond Enquirer an incident of the war of 1812, illustrative of the Indian estimate of the comparative efficiency of Kentucky and Ohio troops on the field of battle. A British officer in the Northwestern campaigns related that their Indian allies had a great horror of Kentuckians while they looked upon Ohioans as not very formidable. It was a common saying among them, "One Indian, one Kentucky--one Indian two Ohio," meaning that in their view it took two Ohio men to make one Kentuckian or one, Indian. "On a certain occasion," said the British officer, "we determined to attack a party of Americans not far from us, in an open field, and called upon the Indians to co-operate with us. They hesitated at first, but consented on being told that they had to fight Ohio troops. In a few minutes the fire was opened upon us, rather unexpectedly to our offi
Americans (search for this): article 3
efficiency of Kentucky and Ohio troops on the field of battle. A British officer in the Northwestern campaigns related that their Indian allies had a great horror of Kentuckians while they looked upon Ohioans as not very formidable. It was a common saying among them, "One Indian, one Kentucky--one Indian two Ohio," meaning that in their view it took two Ohio men to make one Kentuckian or one, Indian. "On a certain occasion," said the British officer, "we determined to attack a party of Americans not far from us, in an open field, and called upon the Indians to co-operate with us. They hesitated at first, but consented on being told that they had to fight Ohio troops. In a few minutes the fire was opened upon us, rather unexpectedly to our officers, upon which the Indians all took to their heels, exclaiming in broken English in their flight, "Kentucky ! Kentucky ! Kentucky !" This incident may be relied upon as historical. Let old Kentucky once more take the field. Let that
urier of Col. Daniel Harvey Hill, Commander of the 1st Regiment North Carolina Volunteers, who so greatly distinguished himself at the battle of Bethel Church, we learn that that accomplished soldier and gentleman is a native of South Carolina, and a graduate of West Point. He entered the United States Military Academy from South Carolina in 1838, and was appointed a Lieutenant in the 1st Regiment United States Artillery in 1842, and in the 4th Artillery in 1845--was made a 1st Lieutenant in 1847, and commanded his company in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, for which service he was made a Captain by brevet — was with the stormers, and made a brevet Major for gallantry and meritorious conduct in storming Chepultepee. He resigned from the Army in 1849, and was presented with a sword by his native State. Just before the present war began, he filled the office of Superintendent of the North Carolina Military Institute at Charlotte. Our readers doubtless remember an eloquent tr
Col. Hill. From a sketch by the Charleston Courier of Col. Daniel Harvey Hill, Commander of the 1st Regiment North Carolina Volunteers, who so greatly distinguished himself at the battle of Bethel Church, we learn that that accomplished soldier and gentleman is a native of South Carolina, and a graduate of West Point. He entered the United States Military Academy from South Carolina in 1838, and was appointed a Lieutenant in the 1st Regiment United States Artillery in 1842, and in the 4th Artillery in 1845--was made a 1st Lieutenant in 1847, and commanded his company in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, for which service he was made a Captain by brevet — was with the stormers, and made a brevet Major for gallantry and meritorious conduct in storming Chepultepee. He resigned from the Army in 1849, and was presented with a sword by his native State. Just before the present war began, he filled the office of Superintendent of the North Carolina Military Institute at Charlo
From a sketch by the Charleston Courier of Col. Daniel Harvey Hill, Commander of the 1st Regiment North Carolina Volunteers, who so greatly distinguished himself at the battle of Bethel Church, we learn that that accomplished soldier and gentleman is a native of South Carolina, and a graduate of West Point. He entered the United States Military Academy from South Carolina in 1838, and was appointed a Lieutenant in the 1st Regiment United States Artillery in 1842, and in the 4th Artillery in 1845--was made a 1st Lieutenant in 1847, and commanded his company in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, for which service he was made a Captain by brevet — was with the stormers, and made a brevet Major for gallantry and meritorious conduct in storming Chepultepee. He resigned from the Army in 1849, and was presented with a sword by his native State. Just before the present war began, he filled the office of Superintendent of the North Carolina Military Institute at Charlotte. Our reader
Col. Hill. From a sketch by the Charleston Courier of Col. Daniel Harvey Hill, Commander of the 1st Regiment North Carolina Volunteers, who so greatly distinguished himself at the battle of Bethel Church, we learn that that accomplished soldier and gentleman is a native of South Carolina, and a graduate of West Point. He entered the United States Military Academy from South Carolina in 1838, and was appointed a Lieutenant in the 1st Regiment United States Artillery in 1842, and in the 4th Artillery in 1845--was made a 1st Lieutenant in 1847, and commanded his company in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, for which service he was made a Captain by brevet — was with the stormers, and made a brevet Major for gallantry and meritorious conduct in storming Chepultepee. He resigned from the Army in 1849, and was presented with a sword by his native State. Just before the present war began, he filled the office of Superintendent of the North Carolina Military Institute at Charlo
graduate of West Point. He entered the United States Military Academy from South Carolina in 1838, and was appointed a Lieutenant in the 1st Regiment United States Artillery in 1842, and in the 4th Artillery in 1845--was made a 1st Lieutenant in 1847, and commanded his company in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, for which service he was made a Captain by brevet — was with the stormers, and made a brevet Major for gallantry and meritorious conduct in storming Chepultepee. He resigned from the Army in 1849, and was presented with a sword by his native State. Just before the present war began, he filled the office of Superintendent of the North Carolina Military Institute at Charlotte. Our readers doubtless remember an eloquent tribute to Southern heroism contained in an address of Col. Hill before a North Carolina Editorial Convention, some extracts from which we transferred to our columns, and which have been generally copied by the Northern as well as the Southern press.
Daniel Harvey Hill (search for this): article 4
Col. Hill. From a sketch by the Charleston Courier of Col. Daniel Harvey Hill, Commander of the 1st Regiment North Carolina Volunteers, who so greatly distinguished himself at the battle of Bethel Church, we learn that that accomplished soldier and gentleman is a native of South Carolina, and a graduate of West Point. He entCol. Daniel Harvey Hill, Commander of the 1st Regiment North Carolina Volunteers, who so greatly distinguished himself at the battle of Bethel Church, we learn that that accomplished soldier and gentleman is a native of South Carolina, and a graduate of West Point. He entered the United States Military Academy from South Carolina in 1838, and was appointed a Lieutenant in the 1st Regiment United States Artillery in 1842, and in the 4th Artillery in 1845--was made a 1st Lieutenant in 1847, and commanded his company in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, for which service he was made a Captain btendent of the North Carolina Military Institute at Charlotte. Our readers doubtless remember an eloquent tribute to Southern heroism contained in an address of Col. Hill before a North Carolina Editorial Convention, some extracts from which we transferred to our columns, and which have been generally copied by the Northern as wel
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 4
graduate of West Point. He entered the United States Military Academy from South Carolina in 1838, and was appointed a Lieutenant in the 1st Regiment United States Artillery in 1842, and in the 4th Artillery in 1845--was made a 1st Lieutenant in 1847, and commanded his company in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, for which service he was made a Captain by brevet — was with the stormers, and made a brevet Major for gallantry and meritorious conduct in storming Chepultepee. He resigned from the Army in 1849, and was presented with a sword by his native State. Just before the present war began, he filled the office of Superintendent of the North Carolina Military Institute at Charlotte. Our readers doubtless remember an eloquent tribute to Southern heroism contained in an address of Col. Hill before a North Carolina Editorial Convention, some extracts from which we transferred to our columns, and which have been generally copied by the Northern as well as the Southern press.
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 4
Charleston Courier of Col. Daniel Harvey Hill, Commander of the 1st Regiment North Carolina Volunteers, who so greatly distinguished himself at the battle of Bethel Church, we learn that that accomplished soldier and gentleman is a native of South Carolina, and a graduate of West Point. He entered the United States Military Academy from South Carolina in 1838, and was appointed a Lieutenant in the 1st Regiment United States Artillery in 1842, and in the 4th Artillery in 1845--was made a 1st LiSouth Carolina in 1838, and was appointed a Lieutenant in the 1st Regiment United States Artillery in 1842, and in the 4th Artillery in 1845--was made a 1st Lieutenant in 1847, and commanded his company in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, for which service he was made a Captain by brevet — was with the stormers, and made a brevet Major for gallantry and meritorious conduct in storming Chepultepee. He resigned from the Army in 1849, and was presented with a sword by his native State. Just before the present war began, he filled the office of Superintendent of the North Carolina Military Institute at Charlotte. Our readers doubtless remember
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