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United States (United States) (search for this): article 21
homas, the valleys of Virginia shall be filled up with bones, or who, like Mr. Fiery, would devote one half of the Southern States to destruction if the remainder could be thus reduced to obedience to the Administration. But the number of persons who approve these views and sentiments is absolutely insignificant. Nine-tenths of the people of Maryland are not only anxious that this war should end, but in order to secure that result they are ready to acknowledge the independence of the Confederate States; and we hazard nothing in saying that the vast majority of them strongly sympathize with the South, and will insist that this State shall share the fortunes of that section as soon as they are satisfied that the Union is hopelessly dissolved. The "Union party" here has not, as is erroneously supposed, been fighting for the Government. The great mass of those who compose it have asserted nothing in the late canvass which is inconsistent with a determination to identify themselves with
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 21
The late election in Maryland. The Baltimore Exchange, in an editorial upon the late election, expresses the following views in regard to the present position of Maryland: "Most of the Northern journals have altogether misapprehended the import of the late election in this State, and are congratulating themselves upon it as an indication that the people of Maryland intend to adhere, henceforth and under all circumstances, to the government of Mr. Lincoln. Much as the "Union" men hiews and sentiments is absolutely insignificant. Nine-tenths of the people of Maryland are not only anxious that this war should end, but in order to secure that resever it shall come fairly before us, an unparalleled unanimity of sentiment in Maryland. At what moment the "Union party" will recognize the necessity of accepting a are equally sure how they will determine it. They, therefore, greatly mistake Maryland who suppose that the late vote is indicative of a disposition on the part of h
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 21
The late election in Maryland. The Baltimore Exchange, in an editorial upon the late election, expresses the following views in regard to the present position of Maryland: "Most of the Northern journals have altogether misapprehended the import of the late election in this State, and are congratulating themselves upon it as an indication that the people of Maryland intend to adhere, henceforth and under all circumstances, to the government of Mr. Lincoln. Much as the "Union" men here have exposed themselves to misconstruction, yet the majority of them have certainly done nothing which warrants the Northern press in treating them as cordial and faithful allies. There are, it is true, some few individuals whose sentiments thoroughly coincide with those of the dominant faction in the North, and who would be content to witness the subjugation of the South. There are some few who are willing that this war shall be prosecuted until, in the language of Governor Thomas, the val
them have certainly done nothing which warrants the Northern press in treating them as cordial and faithful allies. There are, it is true, some few individuals whose sentiments thoroughly coincide with those of the dominant faction in the North, and who would be content to witness the subjugation of the South. There are some few who are willing that this war shall be prosecuted until, in the language of Governor Thomas, the valleys of Virginia shall be filled up with bones, or who, like Mr. Fiery, would devote one half of the Southern States to destruction if the remainder could be thus reduced to obedience to the Administration. But the number of persons who approve these views and sentiments is absolutely insignificant. Nine-tenths of the people of Maryland are not only anxious that this war should end, but in order to secure that result they are ready to acknowledge the independence of the Confederate States; and we hazard nothing in saying that the vast majority of them stron
Francis J. Thomas (search for this): article 21
e "Union" men here have exposed themselves to misconstruction, yet the majority of them have certainly done nothing which warrants the Northern press in treating them as cordial and faithful allies. There are, it is true, some few individuals whose sentiments thoroughly coincide with those of the dominant faction in the North, and who would be content to witness the subjugation of the South. There are some few who are willing that this war shall be prosecuted until, in the language of Governor Thomas, the valleys of Virginia shall be filled up with bones, or who, like Mr. Fiery, would devote one half of the Southern States to destruction if the remainder could be thus reduced to obedience to the Administration. But the number of persons who approve these views and sentiments is absolutely insignificant. Nine-tenths of the people of Maryland are not only anxious that this war should end, but in order to secure that result they are ready to acknowledge the independence of the Confed