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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 22, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 5
Mr. Secretary Toombs. "P. W. A.," the Richmond correspondent of the Savannah Republican, pays Mr. Toombs, the Secretary of State, the following well-merited compliment: "And here let me turn aside to offer a passing remark in regard to Mr. Toombs, the Secretary of State. Many of the people of Georgia, myself among them, have radically differed with him in the past, while all have freely acknowledged his great ability. It has often been said by his friends that he showed off to the best advantage in a rough-and-tumble fight in a court-house, or in such a skirmish as that in the United States House of Representatives during the contest for Speaker, when he said, "Let discord reign forever;" but his conduct during the present revolution proves how much they were mistaken. He now sits-quietly in his office, free from excitement of every kind, with a full appreciation of the vast responsibility that attaches to his position; and yet, for the first time in his life, in my jud
United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
oombs, the Secretary of State, the following well-merited compliment: "And here let me turn aside to offer a passing remark in regard to Mr. Toombs, the Secretary of State. Many of the people of Georgia, myself among them, have radically differed with him in the past, while all have freely acknowledged his great ability. It has often been said by his friends that he showed off to the best advantage in a rough-and-tumble fight in a court-house, or in such a skirmish as that in the United States House of Representatives during the contest for Speaker, when he said, "Let discord reign forever;" but his conduct during the present revolution proves how much they were mistaken. He now sits-quietly in his office, free from excitement of every kind, with a full appreciation of the vast responsibility that attaches to his position; and yet, for the first time in his life, in my judgment, he now brings to the performance of his duties the whole of his great powers and unrivalled abilit
Mr. Secretary Toombs. "P. W. A.," the Richmond correspondent of the Savannah Republican, pays Mr. Toombs, the Secretary of State, the following well-merited compliment: "And here let me turn aside to offer a passing remark in regard to Mr. Toombs, the Secretary of State. Many of the people of Georgia, myself among theMr. Toombs, the Secretary of State, the following well-merited compliment: "And here let me turn aside to offer a passing remark in regard to Mr. Toombs, the Secretary of State. Many of the people of Georgia, myself among them, have radically differed with him in the past, while all have freely acknowledged his great ability. It has often been said by his friends that he showed off to the best advantage in a rough-and-tumble fight in a court-house, or in such a skirmish as that in the United States House of Representatives during the contest for SpeaMr. Toombs, the Secretary of State. Many of the people of Georgia, myself among them, have radically differed with him in the past, while all have freely acknowledged his great ability. It has often been said by his friends that he showed off to the best advantage in a rough-and-tumble fight in a court-house, or in such a skirmish as that in the United States House of Representatives during the contest for Speaker, when he said, "Let discord reign forever;" but his conduct during the present revolution proves how much they were mistaken. He now sits-quietly in his office, free from excitement of every kind, with a full appreciation of the vast responsibility that attaches to his position; and yet, for the first time in his life, in my