hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
France (France) 26 0 Browse Search
Abe Lincoln 20 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 18 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
John Brown 16 0 Browse Search
November 14th 12 12 Browse Search
Breckinridge 10 0 Browse Search
E. B. Cook 10 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 10 0 Browse Search
Lindsey 10 8 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 15, 1860., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 11 total hits in 4 results.

Iowa City (Iowa, United States) (search for this): article 3
Election Riot at Newfoundland. --It seems that our neighbors of the British Provinces might take a lesson from the late peaceful Presidential contest in the United States, in regard to the manner of conducting elections. At Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, as we learn from a telegraphic dispatch in the St. John's Daily News, the occasion being the election of a member of the Island Parliament, a mob collected at half-past 7 o'clock in the evening, and commenced operations by tearing down the telegraph line. They then paraded the town, insulting every person they met, yelling, hooting, &c, till they came to the Wesleyan Chapel, where the congregation were assembled at their devotions. They pelted stones at the windows, and then returned to town, where they kept up their performance till a late hour. The next morning at 11 o'clock, Mr. Higgins was put in nomination as a candidate, and shortly after the mob — numbering about 500 of what are known there as the "River Head boys," and o
Newfoundland (Canada) (search for this): article 3
Election Riot at Newfoundland. --It seems that our neighbors of the British Provinces might take a lesson from the late peaceful Presidential contest in the United States, in regard to the manner of conducting elections. At Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, as we learn from a telegraphic dispatch in the St. John's Daily News, the occasion being the election of a member of the Island Parliament, a mob collected at half-past 7 o'clock in the evening, and commenced operations by tearing down the telegraph line. They then paraded the town, insulting every person they met, yelling, hooting, &c, till they came to the Wesleyan Chapel, where the congregation were assembled at their devotions. They pelted stones at the windows, and then returned to town, where they kept up their performance till a late hour. The next morning at 11 o'clock, Mr. Higgins was put in nomination as a candidate, and shortly after the mob — numbering about 500 of what are known there as the "River Head boys," and o
United States (United States) (search for this): article 3
Election Riot at Newfoundland. --It seems that our neighbors of the British Provinces might take a lesson from the late peaceful Presidential contest in the United States, in regard to the manner of conducting elections. At Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, as we learn from a telegraphic dispatch in the St. John's Daily News, the occasion being the election of a member of the Island Parliament, a mob collected at half-past 7 o'clock in the evening, and commenced operations by tearing down the telegraph line. They then paraded the town, insulting every person they met, yelling, hooting, &c, till they came to the Wesleyan Chapel, where the congregation were assembled at their devotions. They pelted stones at the windows, and then returned to town, where they kept up their performance till a late hour. The next morning at 11 o'clock, Mr. Higgins was put in nomination as a candidate, and shortly after the mob — numbering about 500 of what are known there as the "River Head boys," and
they came to the Wesleyan Chapel, where the congregation were assembled at their devotions. They pelted stones at the windows, and then returned to town, where they kept up their performance till a late hour. The next morning at 11 o'clock, Mr. Higgins was put in nomination as a candidate, and shortly after the mob — numbering about 500 of what are known there as the "River Head boys," and other ruffians — proceeded to Mr. Higgins' house, which they surrounded, and brought him out. They madehe mob — numbering about 500 of what are known there as the "River Head boys," and other ruffians — proceeded to Mr. Higgins' house, which they surrounded, and brought him out. They made threats to himself, family and property if he would not come at once and resign, which he was compelled to do, and Prendergrast, the government nominee, was therefore declared duly elected. This Prendergrast was returned in a similar manner last year, when his seat was declared void by the House of Ass