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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 15, 1860., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 28 total hits in 15 results.

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Chile (Chile) (search for this): article 9
Sir Alexander Forester Cochrane, who, in 1814, took Washington City, the Capital of the United States, and burned the public buildings. In February, 1814, Lord Cochrane, the subject of this article, then a member of Parliament, was accused of having spread a false report of the death of Napoleon for the purpose of affecting the price of stocks, and was condemned to a year's imprisonment and a fine of £ 1,000. He was also excluded from Parliament and the order of the Bath. The fine was paid by his friends; his innocence was afterwards established. In 1818 Lord Cochrane took the command of the naval force of Chile, which he conducted with great credit, and afterwards that of Brazil. In 1823, the Emperor Don Pedro created him Marquis of Maranham. After the peace between Portugal and Brazil he returned to England. In 1826 he intended to enter the Greek service, and finally did enter it in 1827. He continued in that service until the following year, and then returned to England.
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): article 9
, Sir Alexander Forester Cochrane, who, in 1814, took Washington City, the Capital of the United States, and burned the public buildings. In February, 1814, Lord Cochrane, the subject of this article, then a member of Parliament, was accused of having spread a false report of the death of Napoleon for the purpose of affecting the price of stocks, and was condemned to a year's imprisonment and a fine of £ 1,000. He was also excluded from Parliament and the order of the Bath. The fine was paid by his friends; his innocence was afterwards established. In 1818 Lord Cochrane took the command of the naval force of Chile, which he conducted with great credit, and afterwards that of Brazil. In 1823, the Emperor Don Pedro created him Marquis of Maranham. After the peace between Portugal and Brazil he returned to England. In 1826 he intended to enter the Greek service, and finally did enter it in 1827. He continued in that service until the following year, and then returned to England.
Washington (United States) (search for this): article 9
The late Earl of Dundonald. --A correspondent sends the following in reference to the Earl of Dundonald, whose death is announced in the late news from Europe: He was better known as Lord Cochrane. He was born December 2, 1775, and consequently was in the 85th year of his age at the time of his decease. He was educated by his uncle, Sir Alexander Forester Cochrane, who, in 1814, took Washington City, the Capital of the United States, and burned the public buildings. In February, 1814, Lord Cochrane, the subject of this article, then a member of Parliament, was accused of having spread a false report of the death of Napoleon for the purpose of affecting the price of stocks, and was condemned to a year's imprisonment and a fine of £ 1,000. He was also excluded from Parliament and the order of the Bath. The fine was paid by his friends; his innocence was afterwards established. In 1818 Lord Cochrane took the command of the naval force of Chile, which he conducted with g
United States (United States) (search for this): article 9
The late Earl of Dundonald. --A correspondent sends the following in reference to the Earl of Dundonald, whose death is announced in the late news from Europe: He was better known as Lord Cochrane. He was born December 2, 1775, and consequently was in the 85th year of his age at the time of his decease. He was educated by his uncle, Sir Alexander Forester Cochrane, who, in 1814, took Washington City, the Capital of the United States, and burned the public buildings. In February, 1814, Lord Cochrane, the subject of this article, then a member of Parliament, was accused of having spread a false report of the death of Napoleon for the purpose of affecting the price of stocks, and was condemned to a year's imprisonment and a fine of £ 1,000. He was also excluded from Parliament and the order of the Bath. The fine was paid by his friends; his innocence was afterwards established. In 1818 Lord Cochrane took the command of the naval force of Chile, which he conducted with g
Brazil (Brazil) (search for this): article 9
m Parliament and the order of the Bath. The fine was paid by his friends; his innocence was afterwards established. In 1818 Lord Cochrane took the command of the naval force of Chile, which he conducted with great credit, and afterwards that of Brazil. In 1823, the Emperor Don Pedro created him Marquis of Maranham. After the peace between Portugal and Brazil he returned to England. In 1826 he intended to enter the Greek service, and finally did enter it in 1827. He continued in that servicby his friends; his innocence was afterwards established. In 1818 Lord Cochrane took the command of the naval force of Chile, which he conducted with great credit, and afterwards that of Brazil. In 1823, the Emperor Don Pedro created him Marquis of Maranham. After the peace between Portugal and Brazil he returned to England. In 1826 he intended to enter the Greek service, and finally did enter it in 1827. He continued in that service until the following year, and then returned to England.
Don Pedro (search for this): article 9
Sir Alexander Forester Cochrane, who, in 1814, took Washington City, the Capital of the United States, and burned the public buildings. In February, 1814, Lord Cochrane, the subject of this article, then a member of Parliament, was accused of having spread a false report of the death of Napoleon for the purpose of affecting the price of stocks, and was condemned to a year's imprisonment and a fine of £ 1,000. He was also excluded from Parliament and the order of the Bath. The fine was paid by his friends; his innocence was afterwards established. In 1818 Lord Cochrane took the command of the naval force of Chile, which he conducted with great credit, and afterwards that of Brazil. In 1823, the Emperor Don Pedro created him Marquis of Maranham. After the peace between Portugal and Brazil he returned to England. In 1826 he intended to enter the Greek service, and finally did enter it in 1827. He continued in that service until the following year, and then returned to England.
late news from Europe: He was better known as Lord Cochrane. He was born December 2, 1775, and consequently was in the 85th year of his age at the time of his decease. He was educated by his uncle, Sir Alexander Forester Cochrane, who, in 1814, took Washington City, the Capital of the United States, and burned the public buildings. In February, 1814, Lord Cochrane, the subject of this article, then a member of Parliament, was accused of having spread a false report of the death of Napoleon for the purpose of affecting the price of stocks, and was condemned to a year's imprisonment and a fine of £ 1,000. He was also excluded from Parliament and the order of the Bath. The fine was paid by his friends; his innocence was afterwards established. In 1818 Lord Cochrane took the command of the naval force of Chile, which he conducted with great credit, and afterwards that of Brazil. In 1823, the Emperor Don Pedro created him Marquis of Maranham. After the peace between Portugal
Alexander Forester Cochrane (search for this): article 9
The late Earl of Dundonald. --A correspondent sends the following in reference to the Earl of Dundonald, whose death is announced in the late news from Europe: He was better known as Lord Cochrane. He was born December 2, 1775, and consequently was in the 85th year of his age at the time of his decease. He was educated by his uncle, Sir Alexander Forester Cochrane, who, in 1814, took Washington City, the Capital of the United States, and burned the public buildings. In February, 1814, Lord Cochrane, the subject of this article, then a member of Parliament, was accused of having spread a false report of the death of Napoleon for the purpose of affecting the price of stocks, and was condemned to a year's imprisonment and a fine of £ 1,000. He was also excluded from Parliament and the order of the Bath. The fine was paid by his friends; his innocence was afterwards established. In 1818 Lord Cochrane took the command of the naval force of Chile, which he conducted with g
The late Earl of Dundonald. --A correspondent sends the following in reference to the Earl of Dundonald, whose death is announced in the late news from Europe: He was better known as Lord Cochrane. He was born December 2, 1775, and consequently was in the 85th year of his age at the time of his decease. He was educated by his uncle, Sir Alexander Forester Cochrane, who, in 1814, took Washington City, the Capital of the United States, and burned the public buildings. In February, 1814, Lord Cochrane, the subject of this article, then a member of Parliament, was accused of having spread a false report of the death of Napoleon for the purpose of affecting the price of stocks, and was condemned to a year's imprisonment and a fine of £ 1,000. He was also excluded from Parliament and the order of the Bath. The fine was paid by his friends; his innocence was afterwards established. In 1818 Lord Cochrane took the command of the naval force of Chile, which he conducted with gr
, Sir Alexander Forester Cochrane, who, in 1814, took Washington City, the Capital of the United States, and burned the public buildings. In February, 1814, Lord Cochrane, the subject of this article, then a member of Parliament, was accused of having spread a false report of the death of Napoleon for the purpose of affecting the price of stocks, and was condemned to a year's imprisonment and a fine of £ 1,000. He was also excluded from Parliament and the order of the Bath. The fine was paid by his friends; his innocence was afterwards established. In 1818 Lord Cochrane took the command of the naval force of Chile, which he conducted with great credit, and afterwards that of Brazil. In 1823, the Emperor Don Pedro created him Marquis of Maranham. After the peace between Portugal and Brazil he returned to England. In 1826 he intended to enter the Greek service, and finally did enter it in 1827. He continued in that service until the following year, and then returned to England.
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