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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 5, 1860., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 23 total hits in 8 results.

Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 3
Important Announcement. A telegraphic dispatch from Springfield to the New York Herald, dated November 30th, 1860, contains the startling intelligence that of the previous day, being Thanksgiving day, Mr. Lincoln, like the rest of Anglo-Saxon mankind, feasted on a roast turkey, and, having special cause to thank his Maker, attended devine service." "In this electrifying piece of intelligence, the Turkey," as is meet and proper, is mentioned , and "divine service" last. We pass over the pardonable characteristic self-con that all "Anglo-Saxon mankind" were keeping Thanksgiving and eating turkey on the 29th day of November last, whereas, with the exception of a few Yankee Doodle States, composing an infinitesimal portion of the Anglo-Saxon family, their Thanksgiving day is unknown, and turkeys kept for Christmas. But it is a common notion of New England, that it is the hub of the whole of the creation, the axis of the entire universe, and that when it thanks God that it is
United States (United States) (search for this): article 3
creation, the axis of the entire universe, and that when it thanks God that it is not as other men, everybody else is doing the same. The great point, however, is that the eating of a turkey by Mr. Lincoln should be now telegraphed over the United States, when a year ago, a turkey buzzard ending his dinner on a rail, would have been just as likely to have had his performances published. What a race these sycophants are! We have no desire to disparage Thanksgiving day, and certainly no man can speak disparagingly of roasted turkey and even pumpkin pie, as great helps to gratitude and devotion. But, because a ma President of the United States, is he not to be allowed to perform even those most solemn rites of New England religion with any degree of privacy? We insist that Old Abe be permitted to solace himself in peace with all the consolations, carnal and spiritual, which belong to Thanksgiving day, for he has a rough road before him, and may never have reason for a similar cel
New England (United States) (search for this): article 3
th day of November last, whereas, with the exception of a few Yankee Doodle States, composing an infinitesimal portion of the Anglo-Saxon family, their Thanksgiving day is unknown, and turkeys kept for Christmas. But it is a common notion of New England, that it is the hub of the whole of the creation, the axis of the entire universe, and that when it thanks God that it is not as other men, everybody else is doing the same. The great point, however, is that the eating of a turkey by Mr. Lincnd certainly no man can speak disparagingly of roasted turkey and even pumpkin pie, as great helps to gratitude and devotion. But, because a ma President of the United States, is he not to be allowed to perform even those most solemn rites of New England religion with any degree of privacy? We insist that Old Abe be permitted to solace himself in peace with all the consolations, carnal and spiritual, which belong to Thanksgiving day, for he has a rough road before him, and may never have reas
Christmas (search for this): article 3
attended devine service." "In this electrifying piece of intelligence, the Turkey," as is meet and proper, is mentioned , and "divine service" last. We pass over the pardonable characteristic self-con that all "Anglo-Saxon mankind" were keeping Thanksgiving and eating turkey on the 29th day of November last, whereas, with the exception of a few Yankee Doodle States, composing an infinitesimal portion of the Anglo-Saxon family, their Thanksgiving day is unknown, and turkeys kept for Christmas. But it is a common notion of New England, that it is the hub of the whole of the creation, the axis of the entire universe, and that when it thanks God that it is not as other men, everybody else is doing the same. The great point, however, is that the eating of a turkey by Mr. Lincoln should be now telegraphed over the United States, when a year ago, a turkey buzzard ending his dinner on a rail, would have been just as likely to have had his performances published. What a race these
w York Herald, dated November 30th, 1860, contains the startling intelligence that of the previous day, being Thanksgiving day, Mr. Lincoln, like the rest of Anglo-Saxon mankind, feasted on a roast turkey, and, having special cause to thank his Maker, attended devine service." "In this electrifying piece of intelligence, the Turkey," as is meet and proper, is mentioned , and "divine service" last. We pass over the pardonable characteristic self-con that all "Anglo-Saxon mankind" were keeping Thanksgiving and eating turkey on the 29th day of November last, whereas, with the exception of a few Yankee Doodle States, composing an infinitesimal portion of the Anglo-Saxon family, their Thanksgiving day is unknown, and turkeys kept for Christmas. But it is a common notion of New England, that it is the hub of the whole of the creation, the axis of the entire universe, and that when it thanks God that it is not as other men, everybody else is doing the same. The great point, however,
Important Announcement. A telegraphic dispatch from Springfield to the New York Herald, dated November 30th, 1860, contains the startling intelligence that of the previous day, being Thanksgiving day, Mr. Lincoln, like the rest of Anglo-Saxon mankind, feasted on a roast turkey, and, having special cause to thank his Maker, attended devine service." "In this electrifying piece of intelligence, the Turkey," as is meet and proper, is mentioned , and "divine service" last. We pass over England, that it is the hub of the whole of the creation, the axis of the entire universe, and that when it thanks God that it is not as other men, everybody else is doing the same. The great point, however, is that the eating of a turkey by Mr. Lincoln should be now telegraphed over the United States, when a year ago, a turkey buzzard ending his dinner on a rail, would have been just as likely to have had his performances published. What a race these sycophants are! We have no desire to d
November 29th (search for this): article 3
he startling intelligence that of the previous day, being Thanksgiving day, Mr. Lincoln, like the rest of Anglo-Saxon mankind, feasted on a roast turkey, and, having special cause to thank his Maker, attended devine service." "In this electrifying piece of intelligence, the Turkey," as is meet and proper, is mentioned , and "divine service" last. We pass over the pardonable characteristic self-con that all "Anglo-Saxon mankind" were keeping Thanksgiving and eating turkey on the 29th day of November last, whereas, with the exception of a few Yankee Doodle States, composing an infinitesimal portion of the Anglo-Saxon family, their Thanksgiving day is unknown, and turkeys kept for Christmas. But it is a common notion of New England, that it is the hub of the whole of the creation, the axis of the entire universe, and that when it thanks God that it is not as other men, everybody else is doing the same. The great point, however, is that the eating of a turkey by Mr. Lincoln shoul
November 30th, 1860 AD (search for this): article 3
Important Announcement. A telegraphic dispatch from Springfield to the New York Herald, dated November 30th, 1860, contains the startling intelligence that of the previous day, being Thanksgiving day, Mr. Lincoln, like the rest of Anglo-Saxon mankind, feasted on a roast turkey, and, having special cause to thank his Maker, attended devine service." "In this electrifying piece of intelligence, the Turkey," as is meet and proper, is mentioned , and "divine service" last. We pass over the pardonable characteristic self-con that all "Anglo-Saxon mankind" were keeping Thanksgiving and eating turkey on the 29th day of November last, whereas, with the exception of a few Yankee Doodle States, composing an infinitesimal portion of the Anglo-Saxon family, their Thanksgiving day is unknown, and turkeys kept for Christmas. But it is a common notion of New England, that it is the hub of the whole of the creation, the axis of the entire universe, and that when it thanks God that it is