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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 8, 1860., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 4 total hits in 2 results.

Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 4
An abolitionist in Nashville. --The Nashville Gazette of the 1st says, that an abolitionist named "Rev." Mr. Smith had been caught tampering with slaves. His guilt was so apparent, both from the circumstances and his own conduct and appearance during the trial, that he was required to leave the city and State just as soon as the nature of the case would possibly permit, under penalty of receiving a coat of tar and feathers if he remained in the city until Thursday morning.--Like a wise man, he went. He is described as a short, thick set personage, wearing a black wig and the possessor of a most desperately mean countenance.
Delazon Smith (search for this): article 4
An abolitionist in Nashville. --The Nashville Gazette of the 1st says, that an abolitionist named "Rev." Mr. Smith had been caught tampering with slaves. His guilt was so apparent, both from the circumstances and his own conduct and appearance during the trial, that he was required to leave the city and State just as soon as the nature of the case would possibly permit, under penalty of receiving a coat of tar and feathers if he remained in the city until Thursday morning.--Like a wise man, he went. He is described as a short, thick set personage, wearing a black wig and the possessor of a most desperately mean countenance.