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Concord (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
The Vigilance Committee met to-day — a man by the name of Yerdon was tried for tampering with slaves and using incendiary language; the Chairman appointed a committee of 5 to select a jury to try him, and they selected 15 citizens, who, after hearing the evidence, sentenced him to receive 50 lashes on his bare back and have one side of his head shaved and one side of his face blacked, and at one o'clock to-morrow the Marshal of the town to escort him to the railroad, and from thence to Concord, N. C., and deliver him to the proper authorities to receive punishment for his had conduct in that place or vicinity.--The law was strictly enforced at half-after two o'clock this afternoon. The Charleston Courier, speaking in reply to inquiries addressed it, thinks no compromise possible, and that no terms which "the more dominant sections will adopt, even under the imminence of separation, could be honorably accepted by the South."It adds: Admitting however, the adjustment of ter
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
l a public meeting, he has done so, and designated Thursday night next. The "Ready Men" of Norfolk held a meeting this week, and enlisted one hundred men more. The force is to be divided into eight companies, four of which are to be uniformed. The organization has rented a drill room, and "expect to be five hundred strong at their next meeting." At their meeting the other night resolutions "expressive of attachment to the Union and the South" were adopted. The fortifications of Charleston harbor — Activity Therein. The Charleston Mercury gives a description of the fortifications of the harbor and some account of what is going on in them.--Fort Moultrie is an enclosed water battery, having a front on the south, or water side, of about 300 feet, and a depth of about 240 feet--It is built with salient and re-entering angles on all sides, and is admirably adapted for defence, either from the attack of a storming party, or by regular approaches. The outer and inner walls are of
Bangor (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 3
ns mounted on the parapet; the majority of them are eighteen and twenty-four pounders. Some "Columbiads" are, however, within the walls. There are also supplies of powder, shot and shell. At present there is no garrison at the post; the only residents are one or two watchmen, who have charge of the harbor light.--Some thirty or forty day laborers are employed repairing the cisterns and putting the place generally in order. A Northern Statement of Southern Grievances. [From the Bangor (Me.) Union.] For twenty-five years the pulpit, the school, the politician, and the press, have taught the people of the North to hate the people of the South; and yet, during all this time, with a spirit of forbearance unparalleled in the history of the world, the latter, hoping that returning reason might eventually restore a more just and generous conduct, have held up and opposed to outrages of the former, of the most insulting character, only the Constitution of the Union. But now t
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 3
ed to the flames. Mr. Seavy is from the North, but he came forward voluntarily on the occasion, and willingly supplied the torch to the pile. How the preachers stand. The Macon Telegraph says that a vote was taken on the train, between Augusta and Millen, by the Methodist preachers returning from the late session of the Georgia Conference, at Augusta, Saturday morning last. It stood: For secession 87--against it 9. Value of Negroes in the southwest. We have been shown a privAugusta, Saturday morning last. It stood: For secession 87--against it 9. Value of Negroes in the southwest. We have been shown a private dispatch to one of our citizens, dated New Orleans, Dec. 8th, which reads as follows: Commission houses here have stopped making advances on negroes. There is an average decline of four hundred dollars in the value of negroes, compared with last season, and the trade is dull," Military Company at the University. A military company has been formed at the University of Virginia, under the title (of revolutionary memory) of the University Association of the "Sons of Liberty."
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
followed by the other Banks of the city. Gov. Perry, of Florida, is at present in Charleston. The small- pox has created a panic at Columbia, S. C, and it was thought the Legislature would adjourn to Charleston, probably, yesterday. In the North Carolina House of Commons, a resolution has been adopted that both branches of the Legislature shall sign and send to the South Carolina Legislature a paper asking if that body would confer with North Carolina and all the Southern States, in order thaNorth Carolina and all the Southern States, in order that an "honorable adjustment of the present difficulties between the States" may be effected, and a "constitutional Union" thus be preserved. The Columbia (S. C.) papers, in noticing this action, say "too late."--The leading men of all parties at Norfolk, Va., having requested the Mayor to call a public meeting, he has done so, and designated Thursday night next. The "Ready Men" of Norfolk held a meeting this week, and enlisted one hundred men more. The force is to be divided into eight compani
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
e formal execution of plans of secession already conceived and matured. The position of South Carolina. Senator Wigfall, of Texas, an extreme disunionist, defined in his speech Thursday the intentions of South Carolina: South Carolina, he assured the Republican Senators, would be out of the Union before this day week. Immediately on the passage of the seceding ordinance a Minister South Carolina, he assured the Republican Senators, would be out of the Union before this day week. Immediately on the passage of the seceding ordinance a Minister Plenipotentiary and Envoy Extraordinary, accredited to the United States Government, would be dispatched to Washington, fully empowered to negotiate for the recognition of the sovereignty of South CarSouth Carolina, which would bring up the question as to her right to secede. The forts at Charleston may remain in possession of the United States "for a minute, for an hour, for a day, or even for a month," n the subject by the government at Washington. But be assured Senators that if the envoy of South Carolina was not received, and the demands of that State for recognition complied with, her gallant s
Chester, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
esolutions, appointing the Hon. Thomas Ruffin, of Alamance; Weldon N. Edwards, of Warren; Wm. A Graham, of Orange, and Wm. N. H. Smith, of Hertford, Commissioners to the Convention to be held on the 17th December, at Columbia, South Carolina, to urge that body to await a general consultation of the slaveholding States. The resolutions provided that this commission should also attend the Conventions called in other States. An Abolitionist"paid off" and discharged. A letter from Chester, S. C., dated Dec. 11th,says: The Vigilance Committee met to-day — a man by the name of Yerdon was tried for tampering with slaves and using incendiary language; the Chairman appointed a committee of 5 to select a jury to try him, and they selected 15 citizens, who, after hearing the evidence, sentenced him to receive 50 lashes on his bare back and have one side of his head shaved and one side of his face blacked, and at one o'clock to-morrow the Marshal of the town to escort him to the r
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 3
hose who came to resist them "with bloody hands to hospitable graves." This declaration, made in much more violent language than I have given it, is another cause of the depression that pervades the friends of the Union to-day. Affairs in Louisiana. Baton Rouge, Dec. 11. --The bill providing for the election of delegates to the State Convention to be held at Baton Rouge on the 23d of January,has passed both Houses. In the House a strong effort was made to put the question, Convenate passed the Convention bills after an eloquent opposition speech by Mr. Randall Hunt. Mr. Wirt Adams, of Mississippi, was introduced to the Joint Session, and made a speech announcing the action of Mississippi, and asking the co-operation of Louisiana, which was cordially received. The hall was crowded.--A bill to appoint Commissioners to the sister slave States created much discussion, but was lost. A resolution requesting the Governor to communicate to the Governors of other Southern Sta
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
force is to be divided into eight companies, four of which are to be uniformed. The organization has rented a drill room, and "expect to be five hundred strong at their next meeting." At their meeting the other night resolutions "expressive of attachment to the Union and the South" were adopted. The fortifications of Charleston harbor — Activity Therein. The Charleston Mercury gives a description of the fortifications of the harbor and some account of what is going on in them.--Fort Moultrie is an enclosed water battery, having a front on the south, or water side, of about 300 feet, and a depth of about 240 feet--It is built with salient and re-entering angles on all sides, and is admirably adapted for defence, either from the attack of a storming party, or by regular approaches. The outer and inner walls are of brick, capped with stone, and filled in with earth, making a solid wall 15 or 16 feet in thickness. The work now in progress consists in cleaning the sand from the
Orange, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 3
of revolutionary memory) of the University Association of the "Sons of Liberty." The company numbers at present about 75, and there are daily additions. The principal officers are Wm. B. Tabb, Captain; Jas. T. Foster, 1st Lieutenant; 2d Lieutenant, Chas. A Davidson. North Carolina Legislature. On Monday last, in the Senate of North Carolina, Mr. Brown introduced a series of resolutions, appointing the Hon. Thomas Ruffin, of Alamance; Weldon N. Edwards, of Warren; Wm. A Graham, of Orange, and Wm. N. H. Smith, of Hertford, Commissioners to the Convention to be held on the 17th December, at Columbia, South Carolina, to urge that body to await a general consultation of the slaveholding States. The resolutions provided that this commission should also attend the Conventions called in other States. An Abolitionist"paid off" and discharged. A letter from Chester, S. C., dated Dec. 11th,says: The Vigilance Committee met to-day — a man by the name of Yerdon was trie
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