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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1860., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Ossining (New York, United States) (search for this): article 9
Two Noted Women. --Mrs. Henrietta Robinson, the veiled murderess, now at Sing Sing, is thus alluded to by one of the editors of the Albany Courier, who has been visiting the State Prison: Entering the female department, the accustomed eye at once detects the absence of anything like prison discipline. Convicts were running about hither and thither, talking and chatting together in high glee and merry voice. The notabilities in this department are Mrs. Robinson, the veiled murderess, who, by-the-way, was the only prisoner that did not gaze at the visitors with an expression of mingled delight at seeing a strange face, or contemptuous brazenness because they were looked at; and Mrs. Littles, of Rochester, who murdered her husband. The former is instantly recognized by her great beauty, and the possession of intensely red cheeks, which, to a city belle, would be of priceless value; and the latter by a roguish eye and "irrepressible smile."
Henrietta Robinson (search for this): article 9
Two Noted Women. --Mrs. Henrietta Robinson, the veiled murderess, now at Sing Sing, is thus alluded to by one of the editors of the Albany Courier, who has been visiting the State Prison: Entering the female department, the accustomed eye at once detects the absence of anything like prison discipline. Convicts were running about hither and thither, talking and chatting together in high glee and merry voice. The notabilities in this department are Mrs. Robinson, the veiled murderesMrs. Robinson, the veiled murderess, who, by-the-way, was the only prisoner that did not gaze at the visitors with an expression of mingled delight at seeing a strange face, or contemptuous brazenness because they were looked at; and Mrs. Littles, of Rochester, who murdered her husband. The former is instantly recognized by her great beauty, and the possession of intensely red cheeks, which, to a city belle, would be of priceless value; and the latter by a roguish eye and "irrepressible smile."
Two Noted Women. --Mrs. Henrietta Robinson, the veiled murderess, now at Sing Sing, is thus alluded to by one of the editors of the Albany Courier, who has been visiting the State Prison: Entering the female department, the accustomed eye at once detects the absence of anything like prison discipline. Convicts were running about hither and thither, talking and chatting together in high glee and merry voice. The notabilities in this department are Mrs. Robinson, the veiled murderess, who, by-the-way, was the only prisoner that did not gaze at the visitors with an expression of mingled delight at seeing a strange face, or contemptuous brazenness because they were looked at; and Mrs. Littles, of Rochester, who murdered her husband. The former is instantly recognized by her great beauty, and the possession of intensely red cheeks, which, to a city belle, would be of priceless value; and the latter by a roguish eye and "irrepressible smile."