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g the nations of the world as a free, sovereign, independent State, with full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and do all other acts and things which independent States may of right do; and for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance for protection on Divine Providence, we mutually pledge each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor. The second ballot for two other Commissioners to Washington was unsuccessful. On the third ballot, Ex-Gov. J. H. Adams, and ex-Congressman J. L. Orr were elected to act with Mr. Barnwell as Commissioners to treat with the United States. The ratification of the Secession Ordinance — interesting Scenes. The Charleston Mercury has an interesting description of the passage and ratification of the Ordinance of Secession by the State Convention. It says: Precisely at seven minutes after one o'clock, the vote was taken upon the Ordinance — each man's name being called in o
Murder on a Railway Car. --A singular murder was committed on the 6th, on the Mulhouse (France) Railroad. M. Poinsot, one of the Presidents of the Imperial Law Courts, was traveling in a first-class carriage from Troyes to Paris. In the carriage there was but one passenger. On arriving at the station M. Poinsot was found lying in a pool of blood with his throat cut. He was quite dead. The unknown passenger, who had got out the instant the train stopped, disappeared. He had robbed his victim of everything valuable about him.
A Woman and child burnt to death. --The dwelling, house of Michael Haley, of Warren, Iowa, was burned on Tuesday night, the 11th inst., and Mrs. Haley and one of her children were burnt to death with it. Mr. Haley was absent from home, leaving his wife and three children alone. Two of the children escaped from the flames, but came near perishing from the cold before reaching a neighbor's, half a mile distant.
The Paris Pays announces that the Emperor of Austria is about to annul the Concordat with Rome. John Duncan, a member of the Georgia Senate, died on the 16th ult.
Affrays. --An affray took place in Goldsboro', N. C., on the 21st inst., between John Thompson of that place and a Virginian, named Goodwin. Thompson threw a glass at Goodwin, badly cutting his head, and the Virginian, drawing a bowie-knife, nearly severed his antagonist's arm from the shoulder. Neither party was fatally injured. Craft Little was shot and killed at Carnesville. Ga., on the 17th inst., by James W. Harrison, his brother-in-law.
Another Defeat of the Republicans. --A special election for Mayor took place in Springfield, Mass., on the 19th inst., which resulted in the choice of S. C. Bemis, Democrat, by 90 majority, over D. L. Harris, Republican. The vote is 100 larger than that polled at the Presidential election.
Affrays. --An affray took place in Goldsboro', N. C., on the 21st inst., between John Thompson of that place and a Virginian, named Goodwin. Thompson threw a glass at Goodwin, badly cutting his head, and the Virginian, drawing a bowie-knife, nearly severed his antagonist's arm from the shoulder. Neither party was fatally injured. Craft Little was shot and killed at Carnesville. Ga., on the 17th inst., by James W. Harrison, his brother-in-law.
Fatal fire. --A large building in New Haven, known as the "Carpet Factory," inhabited, by 26 families, was burnt on the morning of the 21st inst. The wife and five children of Michael Colbert, living in the third story, were burned to death.
A St. Petersburg letter says the decree emancipating the Russian peasants has been signed by the Emperor Alexander, and that it is to be promulgated on the 1st of January. Rev. Charles B. Dana, D. D., late Rector of Christ Church, in Alexandria, Va., has accepted a call to the rectorship of a Church in Por. Gibson, Miss. T. D. Jones, the sculptor, has been commissioned to make a bust of the President elect for the Republicans of Cincinnati. The Roman Catholic Bishop of Natches has ordered a public three days' devotion, in view of the political crisis. Steene Anderson de Bills, formerly Minister from Denmark to the United States, died at Copenhagen on the 28th ult. Lieut., Maury, U. S. Navy, lately delivered an address before the Royal Geographized Society in London.
Rhode Island. Gov. Sprague, of Rhode Island, in answer to a letter inquiring into the truth of a statement made in the New York Herald, that he would refuse to recommend the repeal of the Personal Liberty bill of that State, has made the following explicit and patriotic response: The Governor of Rhode Island goes heart and hand for the repeal of the so-called Personal Liberty bills of his State, though they are unconstitutional only in spirit. The Legislature, which meets in January, will, without hesitation, repeal them, not from fear or cowardice, but from a brave determination, in face of threats and sneers, to live up to the Constitution and all its guarantees, the better to testify their love for the Union, and the firmer to exact allegiance to it from all others. William Sprague. Mississippi in favor of separate State Secession. A dispatch from the editor of the "Mississippian and State Gazette," published at Jackson — directed to the Mississippi De
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