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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1860., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 8
He had him there! --The witty Scotch advocate, Harry Erskine, on one occasion pleading in London before the House of Lords, had occasion to speak of certain curators, and pronounced the word as in Scotland, with the accent on the first syllable, curators. One of the English judges could not stand this, and cried out, "We are in the habit of saying curator in this country, Mr. Erskine, following the analogy of the Latin language, in which, as you are aware, the penultimate syllable is longied out, "We are in the habit of saying curator in this country, Mr. Erskine, following the analogy of the Latin language, in which, as you are aware, the penultimate syllable is long." "I thank your lordship very much," was Erskine's reply. "We are weak enough in Scotland to think that in pronouncing the word curator, we follow the analogy of the English language. But I need scarcely say that I bow with pleasure to the opinion of so learned a Senator and so great an orator as your lordship."
Harry Erskine (search for this): article 8
He had him there! --The witty Scotch advocate, Harry Erskine, on one occasion pleading in London before the House of Lords, had occasion to speak of certain curators, and pronounced the word as in Scotland, with the accent on the first syllable, curators. One of the English judges could not stand this, and cried out, "We are in the habit of saying curator in this country, Mr. Erskine, following the analogy of the Latin language, in which, as you are aware, the penultimate syllable is long." "I thank your lordship very much," was Erskine's reply. "We are weak enough in Scotland to think that in pronouncing the word curator, we follow the analogy of thesyllable is long." "I thank your lordship very much," was Erskine's reply. "We are weak enough in Scotland to think that in pronouncing the word curator, we follow the analogy of the English language. But I need scarcely say that I bow with pleasure to the opinion of so learned a Senator and so great an orator as your lordship."