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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 2, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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ews by dispatch, and oblige. Wm. Ezzard, Robt. W. Sims, Jas. P. Hambleton, Thos. S. Powell. S. G. Howell, J. A. Hayden, G. W. Adair, R. C. Houlester. Washington, Dec. 29, 1860. In reply to your inquiry, we have hopes that the rights of the South, and of every State and section, may be protected within the Union. Don't give up the ship. Don't despair of the Republic. J. J. Crittenden, S. A. Douglas. Post-offices in South Carolina to be discontinued. Postmaster General Holt will issue orders, on the 1st of the month, to the postmasters throughout the remaining States, to cease all postal intercourse with South Carolina, and not to make up any mail matter for the offices within her borders, on the ground that there are no postmasters there in the service of the United States. Mail matter will be sent to Georgia through South Carolina, and if its transit is interfered with, it will be a subject for the two States to settle between themselves. C
John B. Floyd (search for this): article 1
The National Crisis. the Forts at Charleston — the resignation of Secretary Floyd--Speculations from Washington — views of Messrs. Douglas and Crittenden, &sels, which have brought all kinds of supplies, from cannon to cement. Governor Floyd's resignation. We append Governor Floyd's letter to the President, tendGovernor Floyd's letter to the President, tendering his resignation as Secretary of War, with the President's reply: War Department, Dec. 29, 1860. Sir --On the evening of the 27th inst. I read the f This order, in my judgment, can alone prevent bloodshed and civil war. "John B. Floyd, Secretary of War. "To the President, Dec. 27, 1860." I thenghted faith. With the highest personal regard, I am most truly yours, John B Floyd. To his Excellency the President of the United States. Washington, Deccessor shall be appointed. Yours very respectfully, James Buchanan. Hon. John B. Floyd. Telegraphic Correspondence. The following telegraphic correspon
The schooner W. A. Ellis, which arrived here from New York, on Wednesday last, had on board 500 barrels cement consigned to Fort Moultrie. We learn that its delivery to the United States officers has been prevented for the present, and that it will be placed in store. Two lighters were along side taking the cement on board when the order for its nondelivery was received. We are informed that a large block of granite for Fort Sumter, probably intended for a casemate, now lies on Boyce & Co.'s North Wharf. J. G. Foster, Captain United States Engineers, has been for weeks past a constant consignee by Northern vessels, which have brought all kinds of supplies, from cannon to cement. Governor Floyd's resignation. We append Governor Floyd's letter to the President, tendering his resignation as Secretary of War, with the President's reply: War Department, Dec. 29, 1860. Sir --On the evening of the 27th inst. I read the following paper to you in the pr
zard, Robt. W. Sims, Jas. P. Hambleton, Thos. S. Powell. S. G. Howell, J. A. Hayden, G. W. Adair, R. C. Houlester. Washington, Dec. 29, 1860. In reply to your inquiry, we have hopes that the rights of the South, and of every State and section, may be protected within the Union. Don't give up the ship. Don't despair of the Republic. J. J. Crittenden, S. A. Douglas. Post-offices in South Carolina to be discontinued. Postmaster General Holt will issue orders, on the 1st of the month, to the postmasters throughout the remaining States, to cease all postal intercourse with South Carolina, and not to make up any mail matter for the offices within her borders, on the ground that there are no postmasters there in the service of the United States. Mail matter will be sent to Georgia through South Carolina, and if its transit is interfered with, it will be a subject for the two States to settle between themselves. Charleston to be Declared not a port of e
probably intended for a casemate, now lies on Boyce & Co.'s North Wharf. J. G. Foster, Captain United States Engineers, has been for weeks past a constant consignee by Northern vessels, which have brought all kinds of supplies, from cannon to cement. Governor Floyd's resignation. We append Governor Floyd's letter to the President, tendering his resignation as Secretary of War, with the President's reply: War Department, Dec. 29, 1860. Sir --On the evening of the 27th inst. I read the following paper to you in the presence of the Cabinet: "Council Chamber, Executive Mansion. " Sir — It is evident now from the action of the commander at Fort Moultrie that the solemn pledges of this Government have been violated by Maj, Anderson In my judgment but one remedy is now left us by which to vindicate our honor, and prevent civil war. It is in vain now to hope for confidence on the part of the people of South Carolina in any further pledges as to the action
December 28th (search for this): article 1
y next. I learn from a well-informed gentleman, just arrived from Harrisburg, who saw and conversed with the State officers and legislators elect, that one of the first acts of that government will be an appropriation of from one to five millions of dollars, and one hundred thousand men, armed and equipped, to aid the Federal Government in the preservation of the Union. It is believed by Gov. Curtin that nearly all the other Northern States will follow this example. Resignations. First Lieut. George S. James, of the 4th Regiment Artillery. U. S. A., stationed at Fort Randall, in Nebraska Territory, has resigned his commission, and is on his way home. --Lieut. James was a volunteer in the Abbeville Company of the Palmetto Regiment, and served through the whole of the Mexican war. Hamilton Couper, Esq., U. S. District Attorney for this District, last week tendered his resignation to President Buchanan. So says the Savannah News, of Dec. 28.-- Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle.
December 31st (search for this): article 1
The National Crisis. the Forts at Charleston — the resignation of Secretary Floyd--Speculations from Washington — views of Messrs. Douglas and Crittenden, &c., &c. The Forts at Charleston — condition ofFort Sumter. [From the Charleston Mercury, Dec. 31st.] All day Saturday and yesterday, our gallant troops were busy in the performance of the various duties assigned them by the State. At Fort Moultrie, we are glad to be able to state that matters are progressing swimmingly. The most vigorous measures are on foot to remount the dismantled guns, and every hour is working wonders towards that end.--At various exposed points along the bay, breastworks are being rapidly erected. The details of these fortifications we shall give at another time. But whoever glances at the earnest manner in which these defences are pushed forward, must acknowledge that Carolinians have lost none of the zeal and bravery which distinguished them of old. Sunday was to idle day for the <
December 26th, 1860 AD (search for this): article 1
accepted your resignation of the office of Secretary of War; and not wishing to impose upon you the task of performing its mere routine duties which you have so kindly offered to do, I have authorized the Postmaster General to administer the affairs of the Department until your successor shall be appointed. Yours very respectfully, James Buchanan. Hon. John B. Floyd. Telegraphic Correspondence. The following telegraphic correspondence speaks for itself: Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 26, 1860. Hon. S. A. Douglas or Hon. J. J. Crittenden: Toombs' dispatch of 22d unsettled conservatives here. Is there any hope for Southern rights in the Union? We are for the Union of our fathers, if Southern rights can be preserved in it. If not, we are for secession. Can we yet hope the Union will be preserved on this principle? You are looked to in this emergency. Give us your views by dispatch, and oblige. Wm. Ezzard, Robt. W. Sims, Jas. P. Hambleton, Thos. S. Powell. S. G. Ho
Pettigrew (search for this): article 1
detachment of the Washington Light Infantry was transferred from the former to the latter place in the forenoon, thus retaining at Fort Moultrie the same force as first occupied it. The garrison at Castle Pinckney consists of about two hundred men. Ten twenty-four pound cannon are mounted on the ramparts, besides some fifteen pieces — a few of which are case mated — in the lower tier. The work is well provided with munitions of all kinds, and under the command of its field officers, Col. Pettigrew and Maj. Ellison Capers, will make itself felt, if need be, when the time comes. It is far from being the insignificant position of which it has the reputation. Although a defective construction has impaired the power of the lower batteries to a considerable extent, it has an effective tier of rampart guns, which, from its eligible position, are capable of much service. It is beyond the reach of the largest guns of Fort Sumter, and commands the entire line of wharves and shipping alon
James Buchanan (search for this): article 1
the task of performing its mere routine duties which you have so kindly offered to do, I have authorized the Postmaster General to administer the affairs of the Department until your successor shall be appointed. Yours very respectfully, James Buchanan. Hon. John B. Floyd. Telegraphic Correspondence. The following telegraphic correspondence speaks for itself: Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 26, 1860. Hon. S. A. Douglas or Hon. J. J. Crittenden: Toombs' dispatch of 22d unsettled cst Lieut. George S. James, of the 4th Regiment Artillery. U. S. A., stationed at Fort Randall, in Nebraska Territory, has resigned his commission, and is on his way home. --Lieut. James was a volunteer in the Abbeville Company of the Palmetto Regiment, and served through the whole of the Mexican war. Hamilton Couper, Esq., U. S. District Attorney for this District, last week tendered his resignation to President Buchanan. So says the Savannah News, of Dec. 28.-- Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle.
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