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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 9, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Fernandina, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 1
"An enslaved and servile race you can never make of us, never, never, never!" This reiteration of the word "never" was as free from emotion as if he had been insisting on some simple point of law, which could not be decided in any different way; but free from emotion as it was, it produced the greatest effect. The whole gallery on all sides burst out as in one voice, in uncontrollable applause. The Florida forts taken. The following is an extract from a letter, dated Fernandina, Florida, Jan. 5th: "An order came from the Governor this afternoon at three o'clock, and the Everglade will leave here at midnight for St. Augustine, to have the fort there taken, and to bring us some guns and small arms. "The messenger from the Government reports that the Ordinance of Secession will be ready to be read and passed in Convention on Monday, the 7th inst. Our people here and elsewhere in the State are ripe for secession. The good faith with which the people of South
Empire City (Idaho, United States) (search for this): article 1
be. If the Confederacy is broken up, the Government is dissolved, and it behooves every distinct community as well as every individual to take care of themselves. When disunion has become a fixed and certain fact, why may not New York disrupt the bands which bind her to a venal and corrupt master — to a people and a party that have plundered her revenues, attempted to ruin her commerce, taken away the power of self government, and destroyed the Confederacy of which she was the proud Empire City? Amid the gloom which the present and prospective condition must cast over the country, New York, as a free city, may shed the only light and hope for a future reconstruction of our once blessed Confederacy. Yet I am not prepared to recommend the violence implied in these views. In stating this argument in favor of freedom, "peaceably if we can, forcibly if we must," let me not be misunderstood. The redress can be found only in appeals to the magnanimity of the people of the whole
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
ews from Charleston. The Charleston Mercury of Monday furnishes the following items of military news there: Yesterday afternoon, when copies of our special dispatches from Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Alabama and Washington, reached Fort Moultrie, the glad tidings they contained were greeted by the garrison with buzzes that made the welkin ring. We fancy that the benighted folks in Fort Sumter were rather puzzled to know what their Palmetto neighbors were cheering at. The Surge Hoisting the United States flag at FortSumter. One of the men who recently returned from Fort Sumter details an incident that took place there on Major Anderson taking possession. It is known that the American flag, brought away from Fort Moultrie, was raised at Sumter precisely at noon on the 27th ult., but the incidents of that "flag raising" have not been related. A short time before noon Major Anderson assembled the whole of his little force, with the workmen employed on the fort,
A. B. Moore (search for this): article 1
The parade. --The First Regiment, Colonel Moore, paraded yesterday afternoon. The line was formed on Capitol Square, with the Band and Drum Corps, at 2 o'clock, and after going through some evolutions, in presence of an immense throng, the column marched through the Western gate, in the following order:--Howitzer Company. Capt. Randolph; Grays, Capt. Elliott; Montgomery Guard, Captain Dooley; Company F, Capt. Cary; Company I, Capt. Morris; Company G, Capt. Gordon; Company K, Capt. Miller. The Regiment paraded in overcoats, and looked exceedingly well. In marching down Main street, the spectacle presented was quite imposing.--After returning to the Square, the Regiment was reviewed by Col. Moore, and we noticed that the Band, instead of playing National airs, as on similar anniversaries heretofore, played the Marsellaise. The Colonel then dismissed his command. The Grays remained on the Square, and gave the throng of spectators an opportunity of witnessing some of their s
The parade. --The First Regiment, Colonel Moore, paraded yesterday afternoon. The line was formed on Capitol Square, with the Band and Drum Corps, at 2 o'clock, and after going through some evolutions, in presence of an immense throng, the column marched through the Western gate, in the following order:--Howitzer Company. Capt. Randolph; Grays, Capt. Elliott; Montgomery Guard, Captain Dooley; Company F, Capt. Cary; Company I, Capt. Morris; Company G, Capt. Gordon; Company K, Capt. Miller. The Regiment paraded in overcoats, and looked exceedingly well. In marching down Main street, the spectacle presented was quite imposing.--After returning to the Square, the Regiment was reviewed by Col. Moore, and we noticed that the Band, instead of playing National airs, as on similar anniversaries heretofore, played the Marsellaise. The Colonel then dismissed his command. The Grays remained on the Square, and gave the throng of spectators an opportunity of witnessing some of their sk
The parade. --The First Regiment, Colonel Moore, paraded yesterday afternoon. The line was formed on Capitol Square, with the Band and Drum Corps, at 2 o'clock, and after going through some evolutions, in presence of an immense throng, the column marched through the Western gate, in the following order:--Howitzer Company. Capt. Randolph; Grays, Capt. Elliott; Montgomery Guard, Captain Dooley; Company F, Capt. Cary; Company I, Capt. Morris; Company G, Capt. Gordon; Company K, Capt. Miller. The Regiment paraded in overcoats, and looked exceedingly well. In marching down Main street, the spectacle presented was quite imposing.--After returning to the Square, the Regiment was reviewed by Col. Moore, and we noticed that the Band, instead of playing National airs, as on similar anniversaries heretofore, played the Marsellaise. The Colonel then dismissed his command. The Grays remained on the Square, and gave the throng of spectators an opportunity of witnessing some of their sk
The parade. --The First Regiment, Colonel Moore, paraded yesterday afternoon. The line was formed on Capitol Square, with the Band and Drum Corps, at 2 o'clock, and after going through some evolutions, in presence of an immense throng, the column marched through the Western gate, in the following order:--Howitzer Company. Capt. Randolph; Grays, Capt. Elliott; Montgomery Guard, Captain Dooley; Company F, Capt. Cary; Company I, Capt. Morris; Company G, Capt. Gordon; Company K, Capt. Miller. The Regiment paraded in overcoats, and looked exceedingly well. In marching down Main street, the spectacle presented was quite imposing.--After returning to the Square, the Regiment was reviewed by Col. Moore, and we noticed that the Band, instead of playing National airs, as on similar anniversaries heretofore, played the Marsellaise. The Colonel then dismissed his command. The Grays remained on the Square, and gave the throng of spectators an opportunity of witnessing some of their s
in military matters, we can quite safely assert that nothing could have been more handsomely done. The Grays were out with full ranks, as were also Companies F and G. The Howitzers paraded with horses for the first time, and made a flue appearance. This company has attained a position of which the city may well be proud. Their fierce looking little pieces would do good service if the day of conflict should come. The Young Guard, attached to the 179th Regiment, paraded under Lieut. Austin, and fired a round on Capitol Square. They marched with their usual precision. We hope this gallant company will keep up the military steam, for in these days it is a matter of no small importance. The Governor's Guard, Capt. Cabell, well mounted and equipped, paraded at the Old Fair Grounds, and rode through the city in the afternoon. The appearance of this fine body of cavalry was universally complimented. It convinced every one that the right spirit pervades the ranks, and tha
H. C. Cabell (search for this): article 1
der Lieut. Austin, and fired a round on Capitol Square. They marched with their usual precision. We hope this gallant company will keep up the military steam, for in these days it is a matter of no small importance. The Governor's Guard, Capt. Cabell, well mounted and equipped, paraded at the Old Fair Grounds, and rode through the city in the afternoon. The appearance of this fine body of cavalry was universally complimented. It convinced every one that the right spirit pervades the rankn Broad street, near the City Hall, which excited the astonishment of the spectators. After this the company marched through Main street and returned to their Armory. Last, but by no means least, we mention the old Fayette Artillery. Captain H. C. Cabell. --We allude to this company last, because they were the last to leave the field. They had out two guns, and marched in front of the First Regiment. We are gratified to note a steady improvement, which is a good omen of future efficiency
The parade. --The First Regiment, Colonel Moore, paraded yesterday afternoon. The line was formed on Capitol Square, with the Band and Drum Corps, at 2 o'clock, and after going through some evolutions, in presence of an immense throng, the column marched through the Western gate, in the following order:--Howitzer Company. Capt. Randolph; Grays, Capt. Elliott; Montgomery Guard, Captain Dooley; Company F, Capt. Cary; Company I, Capt. Morris; Company G, Capt. Gordon; Company K, Capt. Miller. The Regiment paraded in overcoats, and looked exceedingly well. In marching down Main street, the spectacle presented was quite imposing.--After returning to the Square, the Regiment was reviewed by Col. Moore, and we noticed that the Band, instead of playing National airs, as on similar anniversaries heretofore, played the Marsellaise. The Colonel then dismissed his command. The Grays remained on the Square, and gave the throng of spectators an opportunity of witnessing some of their sk
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