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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 9, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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The parade. --The First Regiment, Colonel Moore, paraded yesterday afternoon. The line was formed on Capitol Square, with the Band and Drum Corps, at 2 o'clock, and after going through some evolutions, in presence of an immense throng, the column marched through the Western gate, in the following order:--Howitzer Company. Capt. Randolph; Grays, Capt. Elliott; Montgomery Guard, Captain Dooley; Company F, Capt. Cary; Company I, Capt. Morris; Company G, Capt. Gordon; Company K, Capt. Miller. The Regiment paraded in overcoats, and looked exceedingly well. In marching down Main street, the spectacle presented was quite imposing.--After returning to the Square, the Regiment was reviewed by Col. Moore, and we noticed that the Band, instead of playing National airs, as on similar anniversaries heretofore, played the Marsellaise. The Colonel then dismissed his command. The Grays remained on the Square, and gave the throng of spectators an opportunity of witnessing some of their sk
The parade. --The First Regiment, Colonel Moore, paraded yesterday afternoon. The line was formed on Capitol Square, with the Band and Drum Corps, at 2 o'clock, and after going through some evolutions, in presence of an immense throng, the column marched through the Western gate, in the following order:--Howitzer Company. Capt. Randolph; Grays, Capt. Elliott; Montgomery Guard, Captain Dooley; Company F, Capt. Cary; Company I, Capt. Morris; Company G, Capt. Gordon; Company K, Capt. Miller. The Regiment paraded in overcoats, and looked exceedingly well. In marching down Main street, the spectacle presented was quite imposing.--After returning to the Square, the Regiment was reviewed by Col. Moore, and we noticed that the Band, instead of playing National airs, as on similar anniversaries heretofore, played the Marsellaise. The Colonel then dismissed his command. The Grays remained on the Square, and gave the throng of spectators an opportunity of witnessing some of their s
cision. We hope this gallant company will keep up the military steam, for in these days it is a matter of no small importance. The Governor's Guard, Capt. Cabell, well mounted and equipped, paraded at the Old Fair Grounds, and rode through the city in the afternoon. The appearance of this fine body of cavalry was universally complimented. It convinced every one that the right spirit pervades the ranks, and that the members acknowledge no such word as fail. The Public Guard, Captain Dimmock, paraded with their full band. Early in the afternoon they performed some evolutions on Broad street, near the City Hall, which excited the astonishment of the spectators. After this the company marched through Main street and returned to their Armory. Last, but by no means least, we mention the old Fayette Artillery. Captain H. C. Cabell. --We allude to this company last, because they were the last to leave the field. They had out two guns, and marched in front of the First Reg
John Morris (search for this): article 1
The parade. --The First Regiment, Colonel Moore, paraded yesterday afternoon. The line was formed on Capitol Square, with the Band and Drum Corps, at 2 o'clock, and after going through some evolutions, in presence of an immense throng, the column marched through the Western gate, in the following order:--Howitzer Company. Capt. Randolph; Grays, Capt. Elliott; Montgomery Guard, Captain Dooley; Company F, Capt. Cary; Company I, Capt. Morris; Company G, Capt. Gordon; Company K, Capt. Miller. The Regiment paraded in overcoats, and looked exceedingly well. In marching down Main street, the spectacle presented was quite imposing.--After returning to the Square, the Regiment was reviewed by Col. Moore, and we noticed that the Band, instead of playing National airs, as on similar anniversaries heretofore, played the Marsellaise. The Colonel then dismissed his command. The Grays remained on the Square, and gave the throng of spectators an opportunity of witnessing some of their sk
st time, and made a flue appearance. This company has attained a position of which the city may well be proud. Their fierce looking little pieces would do good service if the day of conflict should come. The Young Guard, attached to the 179th Regiment, paraded under Lieut. Austin, and fired a round on Capitol Square. They marched with their usual precision. We hope this gallant company will keep up the military steam, for in these days it is a matter of no small importance. The Governor's Guard, Capt. Cabell, well mounted and equipped, paraded at the Old Fair Grounds, and rode through the city in the afternoon. The appearance of this fine body of cavalry was universally complimented. It convinced every one that the right spirit pervades the ranks, and that the members acknowledge no such word as fail. The Public Guard, Captain Dimmock, paraded with their full band. Early in the afternoon they performed some evolutions on Broad street, near the City Hall, which exci
N. W. Miller (search for this): article 1
The parade. --The First Regiment, Colonel Moore, paraded yesterday afternoon. The line was formed on Capitol Square, with the Band and Drum Corps, at 2 o'clock, and after going through some evolutions, in presence of an immense throng, the column marched through the Western gate, in the following order:--Howitzer Company. Capt. Randolph; Grays, Capt. Elliott; Montgomery Guard, Captain Dooley; Company F, Capt. Cary; Company I, Capt. Morris; Company G, Capt. Gordon; Company K, Capt. Miller. The Regiment paraded in overcoats, and looked exceedingly well. In marching down Main street, the spectacle presented was quite imposing.--After returning to the Square, the Regiment was reviewed by Col. Moore, and we noticed that the Band, instead of playing National airs, as on similar anniversaries heretofore, played the Marsellaise. The Colonel then dismissed his command. The Grays remained on the Square, and gave the throng of spectators an opportunity of witnessing some of their sk
Edmond Bossieux (search for this): article 1
overcoats, and looked exceedingly well. In marching down Main street, the spectacle presented was quite imposing.--After returning to the Square, the Regiment was reviewed by Col. Moore, and we noticed that the Band, instead of playing National airs, as on similar anniversaries heretofore, played the Marsellaise. The Colonel then dismissed his command. The Grays remained on the Square, and gave the throng of spectators an opportunity of witnessing some of their skillful manœuvres, Lieut. Bossieux taking the command. The evolutions of the company were precise and accurate, and excited the admiration of every one. In the most rapid movements, every man kept his position, and although we don't pretend to much in military matters, we can quite safely assert that nothing could have been more handsomely done. The Grays were out with full ranks, as were also Companies F and G. The Howitzers paraded with horses for the first time, and made a flue appearance. This company has at
Bed Blankets of all kinds, at Negro Blankets, white and grey, at Levy's; great bargains in Cambric Collars at Levy's. Bed Blankets of all kinds, at Negro Blankets, white and grey, at Levy's; great bargains in Cambric Collars at Levy's.
Wanted — to Hire --For this year, a good Cook, Washer and Ironer, without any encumbrance, at a fair price at J. Millhiser & Bro.'S, 193 Broad street. ja 8--2t
J. Millhiser (search for this): article 1
Wanted — to Hire --For this year, a good Cook, Washer and Ironer, without any encumbrance, at a fair price at J. Millhiser & Bro.'S, 193 Broad street. ja 8--2t
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